Does a daily aspirin work to prevent heart attacks?

Yes. Studies have show that it helps just as does brushing and flossing teeth every night before bed!
Yes, but at a price. Daily Aspirin clearly reduces the risk of both heart attack and stroke, but also makes you more likely to bleed. If you have coronary disease, you are better taking it. If you are at low risk of heart attack, the benefits may not outweigh the risks. If you don't have known coronary disease but have risk factors, it is a toss-up.

Related Questions

Should older persons without heart problems take an aspirin daily to prevent a heart attack?

Maybe. While in previous years Aspirin was recommended for most men and women over age 55, this question has recently been reexamined with now much different recommendations. For men the current recommendation is for 81mg of Aspirin only in men with known coronary artery disease to prevent heart attacks. For women the recommendation is 81 mg only for women over age 65 to prevent strokes. Read more...

Is is safe for everybody in the country to take a baby aspirin daily to help prevent a heart attack?

No. Every study that has examined this question has shown that among large populations exposed to small doses of aspirin, there is an increase in peptic ulceration, abnormal bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage when compared to matched controls who received no aspirin. Only those at risk of heart attacks or clotting type strokes should take it. (men>50, women >60 if there's no contraindication). Read more...
NO. Routine use of any medication to the population at large can create newer problems that we are not anticipating before. Low dose Aspirin can prevent platelet aggregation and decrease the incidence of coronary thrombosis in high risk patients.People with diabetes mellitus, obesity , family history of heart disease or previous myocardial infarction are the prime people to benefit from Aspirin therapy. Read more...

Should I take daily baby aspirin to prevent heart attack?

Depends. That is a good question. I'd recommend you talk with your doctor about your cardiovascular risk (including risk for heart attack) and also at the risks and benefits of Aspirin therapy, and then together come up with the right answer for you individually. Read more...
Can't say. For some it may be a good idea.For others it may trigger problems by itself or interact with meds and lead to severe bleeding complications. Without knowing your situation it is unrealistic to say. Read more...

What's the right dose of aspirin.? To prevent an heart attack?

Baby aspirin. 81 mg (as opposed to 325 mg daily) usually taken every day or even every other day has been shown to be equally effective for prevention heart attacks- with no other risk factors than - note this is still controversial as some docs still recommend 162-325 mg daily. I do defer to my cards colleagues and leave my patients on what they recommend. Read more...

Is it better to take aspirin at night or morning to prevent heart attack?

Evening. Aspirin inhibits platelets irreversibly. The effect wears off as time goes on and is renewed when the new dose is taken. Since most heart attacks occur in the early am the greatest protection will be achieved by taking Aspirin at night. Read more...
Interesting ??? I don't know if that has ever been studied, my guess would be that night is better since early am is a frequent time for chest pain, and you might not be taking this early enough in the day otherwise. What is important is to take it daily. Read more...

Is it true that aspirin does not help women to prevent a heart attack? Just read that in several sites online and im worried

Yes and no. Recent large studies following women who took low dose 81 mg Aspirin over several years found that it was ineffective in preventing heart attacks but did reduce strokes in woman over 65. At the time of a heart attack or suspected heart attack it is strongly recommended that both men and women swallow two full crushed aspirins which can help dissolve blood clots in the coronary arteries. Read more...
Doc. Asa does not do the job alone. Risk factors are important such as cholesterol, blood pressure and so on... Check with your doc. Read more...