Can I improve my coronary artery disease my improving my cholesterol?

Yes. There are multiple studies to show the outcome in patients with coronary disease (CAD) is significantly improved by lowering the bad cholesterol (ldl). This presumably leads to plaque stabilization which is possibly the reason these drugs lead to lessening of the event (death, heart attack, etc.) rate in this patient population.
Absolutely. By maintaining a cholesterol to HDL ratio of 3:1 or less, and by keeping your LDL below 100, you can not only stop the progression of coronary artery disease, you could, per studies, actually reverse the course of progressive disease.
Yes. Studies show that raising HDL ("good") cholesterol levels above 45 mg/dl can result in plaque regression. It should be noted, however, that there should not be an expectation that one goes from 40% blockage due to plaque to 0% blockage. Any regression that is to occur will occur with the "soft" plaque, the more recently deposited plaque.
Lowering cholesterol. Elevated cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, and people with elevated cholesterol and other risk factors such as smoking or high blood pressure are at greater risk. Lowering cholesterol with drugs such as statins in patients with high cholesterol or increased risk has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, stroke, & death .These drugs are not for everyone, use with md supervision.
Absolutely. Plaque build up and particlarly plaque rupture involves cholesterol directly. Therefore, by improving cholesterol one can contain the rate of plaque buidl up. When using certain type of medications known as statins, we can slow down build up of plaque as well as (more improtantly) prevent plaque rupture which is the inciting event in a heart attack.
Yes. For individuals with elevated LDL ("bad") cholesterol, studies show that reducing LDL levels to less than 70 mg/dl will result in a cessation of plaque deposition.

Related Questions

How can I prevent from getting coronary artery disease?

Basic things. Watch your weight. Exercise. Control your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you are a diabetic, keep your sugar under control. Take your medication, if any. And above all, don't smoke. Read more...

How do I know whether I have angina or coronary artery disease?

Symptom vs disease. Angina, or chest pain or angina equivalents (there are many) are a symptom usually of heart disease. Coronary artery disease, cad, is a progressive disease: plaque builds up in the arteries of the heart and this can lead to blockage(s), ischemia (insufficient blood flow) which can cause pain or angina. Read more...
In specificity . Angina is chest pain due to diminished blood flow to heart muscle; maybe from constriction or blockage. Coronary disease is abnormality in coronary artery itself . Heart disease is abnormality in any part of the heart. Read more...

I'm diabetic, am I more likely to develop coronary artery disease?

Yes. The answer is yes. But by strictly controlling your diabetes, stopping smoking - if you smoke, staying at a very healthy weight, eating properly, exercising (if you have health problems consult your doctor before starting any exercise program) every day, taking any prescribed medications as instructed and having regular check-ups to catch changes quickly you can impact your health tremendously. Read more...
Yes, unfortunately. Your are if you don't aggressively manage it. Someone who has diabetes has the same risk of a heart attack as someone who has already had one cardiac event. Diabetics need to be aggressively treated with aspirin, cholesterol lower medications, treatment of the underlying disease and also blood pressure medications. Read more...
Yes. Your risk is higher than normal. Modifying the risks you can i.e. NOT smoking is crucial. Maintain a healthy lifestyle (exercise) and having a good diet are beneficial as well as good blood sugar control and management of any hypertension. Read more...

With coronary artery disease am I more susceptible for having a stroke?

Yes. The artery disease is not necessarily limited to just your coronary arteries. If you have it in one area, it probably is in other areas. So you are also subject to have strokes, kidney disease, and disease of the arteries in the legs for instance. Also certain complications of the coronary disease or its treatment could make you more at risk for a stroke. Read more...
Yes. Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects all arteries in the body. The plain and simple answer is yes. Read more...

What must I do if I have been diagnosed with coronary artery disease (cad)?

Heart healthy. Atherosclerosis is very common and requires treatment for severe asymptomatic lesions but more commonly for symptomatic obstructions. If you don't need revascularization yet via stents or surgery then lifestyle modifications and medication to prevent progression of the atherosclerosis is needed. Read more...

I am 18 and having chest tightness is it CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE?

Chest tightness. Need to know more information and you will need to be examined. Read more...
Unlikely. Unless you have the premature aging disease progeria you would not be a candidate for coronary artery disease. Most "chest tightness" at your age is related to the digestive structures that run underneath the heart or the lungs on either side. They call it heart burn for a reason. See your doc for an exam. Some TUMS may give you short term relief. Read more...