Could drinking alcohol cause tooth decay?

Possibly yes. Dry mouth can greatly increase your chance of developing dental decay. If you are an alcoholic, then you experience dry mouth. If you binge drink, then you will notice that you have dry mouth the following morning.
No. Drinking alcohol does not cause tooth decay. Poor oral hygiene and consuming foods and liquids high in refined sugars and acids promote tooth decay. This assumes drinking alcohol in moderation. Brush and floss after meals and see your dentist for routine check-ups, cleanings and to monitor caries.

Related Questions

Can drinking hawthorne tea cause tooth decay?

Tea and decay. It depends on the sugar and acid content of the tea, also extreme temperatures cause expansion and contraction that can cause small fractures that can lead to decay. Get an evaluation from a dentist to see how your teeth are doing now. Read more...
Depends. Hawthorn is a plant. The leaves, berries, and flowers of hawthorn are used to make medicine and tea. If these product contain too much sugar than they may cause cavities otherwise they are unrelated. Read more...

Is tooth decay just a natural part of aging? I don't eat much sugar or drink any soda, but as I've gotten into my 50s it just seems like I have more decay and cavities at each visit to the dentist. I do my best to take care of my teeth, but I seem to be

Hard . Hard to quantify what you consider more decay. Are there new cavities, or older filling that are breaking down? Fillings don't last forever, so if you find that you are replacing dental restorations that have been done a while ago, then yes, it is part of the restoration aging. Being older, are you on specific meds, such as hiogh blood pressure medication? That may make your mouth drier, which can result in more cavities. Your diet may have also changed. The bacteria that produce the acid that causes the cavities don't only eat processed sugars and soda. Consult with your dentist, explain your concerns, and ask for some guidance as to your brushing/flossing technique. Also discuss whether these cavities are new or recurrent decay. Hope this info helps. Read more...
Many . Many factors enter into the equation. Sometimes sugars sneak into your diet and you don't even know it. Body chemistry can also affect tooth decay. Also consider your home care regimen--are you brushing twice a day and flossing at night--you don't mention that. If all else is good, there are rinses and pastes that can be prescribed to help cut down on decay. Not that it's normal but most people experience some tooth decay during their lifetime. Read more...
My . My colleagues are right. Tooth decay is not a natural part of aging. However, other symptoms of aging can affect increase tooth decay. Make sure that you see your dentist regularly, get regular xrays, and proper cleanings, and you will maximize the life of your dentition. Read more...
Not directly. Decay is caused by bacteria. It could increase with age due to change in diet or eating habits, change in health or medications, wear & tear, or simply be that you finally found a cavity that has been "under the radar" for the last 10 years. Don't ignore it: talk with your dentist or hygienist and audit your life to figure out what can improve. This is usually case specific. Good luck ;). Read more...
As we age... Various conditions can occur that can lead to more decay. Periodontal disease (gum & bone recession) which results in exposed root surfaces which are much more prone to decay than the enamel (white layer). Dry mouth, various medications etc, lead to less saliva, and decay occurs. Cracks in teeth from daily usage, get larger, decay and chipping occur. Age & breakdown of existing fillings. Read more...
I concur... Besides the many causes listed, there is evidence of change in oral bacteria in aging. Early in life caries has an enamel only presentation from such bacteria as strep mutans, while in aging it can have a cemental/root caries presentation from bacteria such as the actinomyces family. Either way, good oral hygiene, routine dental care, Fluoride , & saliva substitutes can help manage this. Read more...
Changing oral enviro. My collegue is right on. I can't stress enough the decrease in saliva some people experience in aging. In addition, some meds you may be taking may reduce saliva. Discuss this web your dentist and physician! Read more...
Addendum. I have read through my colleagues answers and i agree with what they write. I would just like to add that for those patients with a higher incidence of cavities, be it from a dry mouth, exposed root surfaces or dietary choices, i recommend using perio protect trays with a weak hydrogen peroxide gel called periogel to kill the bacteria that are involved in causing cavities. See your dentist. Read more...
Saliva pH. Great suggestions from everyone. Check your saliva ph. If very acidic, you may get more cavities. Read more...
You. You may also want to look into incorporating xylitol into your daily oral hygiene routine. Read more...
Depends on location . The type of cavity is the issue. Your body does change with age and especially with medications. Dry mouth is disastrous for teeth yet many medications will cause saliva to change/dry up. The prescriber is obligated to discuss this with you. Be careful if "doing your best" and not getting good results, your technique may be poor. See your dentist for help. Also, fillings don't last forever. Read more...
There is a reason... All my colleagues gave you great answers. The way to get the most accurate answer for you in particular and at this time is to ask the dentist who has been treating you. It may be one factor in particular or a combination of factors. Read more...
More frequent recall. As you age, your gums recede allowing more of the tooth to be exposed which is normally covered by the gingiva. This exposure of the root of the tooth is suseptable to decay. It may be a great idea to use additional protection, such as a prescription for fluoride and an increased schedule of hygiene-- ie- go four times a year, every three monthes instead of two times a year. Read more...

Is any amount of acidic drinks okay if you're worried about tooth decay? I don't drink much soda at all, but really do like orange juice and other citrus juices. I've heard that they're not much better than soda for your teeth. Should I just stop drinking

Any . Any acidic liquid can have an adverse effect on the tooth enamel. Although citrus juices are healthy and a normal part of the diet constant bathing of your teeth all day will take its toll. Try to limit the number of exposures and if not brush more frequently and rinse, rinse , rinse--even with water just to reduce the acidity. Read more...
I . I agree with dr. Scharf, but want to change the wording ever so slightly... Rinse with water, period. Many juices contains a large amount of added sugar, which is not only terrible to your teeth but to your general health as well. Even natural juices containment lots of sugar, naturally. Either way, drink the juice, enjoy it, then rinse your teeth vigorously with plain, old water. After the acidity and sugars are removed from your teeth, you can go ahead and brush your teeth. Stay healthy. Read more...
BrushFlossFluoride. Soda, fruit juice, citrus juice all contain sugar with is harvested by the bacterial plaque in your mouth to make acid which then dissolves the enamel of your teeth. Acidic/sugary drinks can accelerate the process by adding citric acid to the mix as well. As with any sugary foods/drinks, proper brushing and flossing will maintain your teeth healthy and strong. Fluoride rinses are good too! Read more...
Yes, ok. As mentioned any acidic drink can be detrimental to enamel. But that is not to say you have to give them up completely. Limit these drinks to meals (when salivary flow is highest), never brush your teeth immediately afterwards (when enamel is softest). You may want to considering watering the drinks down a bit.M use flouride rinse daily to help strengthen enamel. Use moderation. Read more...