I'm diabetic, am I more likely to develop coronary artery disease?

Yes. The answer is yes. But by strictly controlling your diabetes, stopping smoking - if you smoke, staying at a very healthy weight, eating properly, exercising (if you have health problems consult your doctor before starting any exercise program) every day, taking any prescribed medications as instructed and having regular check-ups to catch changes quickly you can impact your health tremendously.
Yes. Your risk is higher than normal. Modifying the risks you can i.e. NOT smoking is crucial. Maintain a healthy lifestyle (exercise) and having a good diet are beneficial as well as good blood sugar control and management of any hypertension.
Yes, unfortunately. Your are if you don't aggressively manage it. Someone who has diabetes has the same risk of a heart attack as someone who has already had one cardiac event. Diabetics need to be aggressively treated with aspirin, cholesterol lower medications, treatment of the underlying disease and also blood pressure medications.

Related Questions

Are there lifestyle changes that really make getting coronary artery disease less likely?

Lifestyle changes. There are risk factors you can't control, like family history and diseases you've had that put you at risk. Most of the risk factors are within your control, such as diet and exercise to keep you LDL low and your HDL high. Discuss preventive measures with your doctor as everyone can benefit from this, get regular checkups and blood tests to help plan prevention. Do not smoke or take drugs. Read more...
Absolutely. Lifestyle changes likely have more effect on preventing coronary artery disease than any "medical intervention". The big ones are not smoking, regular exercise, and what is sometimes described as a "mediterranean diet": abundant fruits and vegetables, olive oil as the principal source of fat, fish and poultry consumed in low to moderate amounts, red meat in low amounts, red wine in low amounts. Read more...

Can you develop coronary artery disease without knowing?

Yes. The process of atherosclerosis begins at birth. It accelerates based on risk factors and genetics as well as life style. It often goes undetected until the first event which cam be a fatal hear attack, know your risk and be proactive. See your doctor. Read more...
Yes. The earliest manifestations of coronary disease, at autopsy, were noted in teenagers who died from motor vehicle accidents and soldiers killed on the battlefield. The disease begins at an early age but only becomes symptomatic later in life. Read more...

How can you develop coronary artery disease without hypertension? What is the liklihood of contracting coronary artery disease without any hypertension?

Having . Having ideal blood pressure (<120/80 mmhg) goes a long way toward preventing coronary artery disease, but it is only one of several risk factors. Some risk factors cannot be controlled, such as age, gender and genetics. But other things you can do to help prevent atherosclerosis include abstaining from tobacco, controlling your cholesterol, maintaining a healthy body weight, exercising, and minimizing stress. Unfortunately, hypertension is very common and the majority of people develop it at some point in their life as they age. Read more...
Yes. Risk for development of CAD (coronary artery disease) is multi-factorial. Genetics, cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, obesity, sedantary lifestyle, stress, life style choices etc can all contribute as much as hypertension, although hypertension tends to be a common assocaited condition with cad. Read more...

What would cause me to sweat a lot I'm 54 have diabetes and coronary artery disease?

Multiple causes. Sweating implies excessive Adrenalin secretion (sympathetic nerve stimulation). This could happen for multiple reasons. Poor stamina, cardiac dysfunction, BP abnormalities, low blood sugar, excessive thyroid, infection, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction due to oth physiologic stressors are some of the possibilities. If no obvious cause, would suggest you see your doctor for checkup. Read more...

My father was diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Will I get this disease when I'm older?

Not necessarily. Lucklily genes are just one part of us. Environment also makes a difference. My father also had heart disease. I know that I have an increased genetic risk of similar problems so i work at taking care of myself. I suggest you focus on modifying your risk factors by maintaining a healthy weight by following a good diet and exercise. I suggest having your cholesterol checked on a regular basis. Read more...
You might. There are many factors contributing to coronary artery disease. Some are genetic - we can't choose our parents - so you may be more likely than others to get cad. Even so, you can modify many of your risk factors, and i encourage you to do so. Talk to your doctor to find out a more personalized approach. Read more...