Are there racial differences in regards to levels of coronary artery disease?

Always. Many stuides show differences among racial lines; my personal opinion is that these really demonstrate differences in socioeconomic levels. I feel it is much more dependent upon income levels and the types of foods and lifestyle a person leads. Lower socioeconomic groups tend to eat foods that are less healthy and engage in alcohol and tobacco use as well as engaging in less exercise.
CAD. All races get coronary artery disease. Incidence of CAD may be related to the prevalence of diabetes in different ethnic groups.
Yes. The reported incidence of heart disease is higher in minorities, but it is unclear whether this due actual incidence or poor identification until a problem exists. Better preventive care and follow up likely eliminate any racial differences.

Related Questions

Are there gender differences in regards to levels of coronary artery disease?

Yes. Men have higher rates of CAD and they tend to suffer at an earlier age. This is part of the reason the life expectancy of men is shorter than women. Read more...
Many diffrences. Women tend to develope heart disease later in life they have more atypical symptoms , smaller vessels and more diffuse disease. Read more...

Does high levels of salt contribute to coronary artery disease?

Not really. High salt intake will have an impact on fluid retention and blood pressure and as such play a role in the dynamics of blood flow in your arteries as well as trigger a few, expected, hormonal responses to deal with the salt load and thus possibly contribute to the development of plaques, but there is no direct imapct of salt on the plaque in the arteries. Read more...
Indirectly. High salt intake, in some people, is associated with development of high blood pressure, hypertension. High blood pressure is an important factor in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Read more...
Not generally. Many, many studies have failed to show a clear correlation between sodium ("salt") consumption and cardiovascular mortality. At levels > 7gm per day, by the governments own data is when most significant effects occur for those without sodium sensitive conditions like congestive heart failure. The average american consumes about 3400mg/day. The biggest source to dietary sodium is preprocessed food. Read more...