6 doctors weighed in:

How long does it take to get oral cancer from chewing tobacco? Worse if chew in off season?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Varies

Oral cancer has developed in teen agers from use of oral tobacco.
Usually it takes many years. It is a very bad idea to use tobacco in any form. The sooner you quit the better.

In brief: Varies

Oral cancer has developed in teen agers from use of oral tobacco.
Usually it takes many years. It is a very bad idea to use tobacco in any form. The sooner you quit the better.
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Thank
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Every chew releases

Carcinogens; the cancer may take years to appear after a single exposure.
There are teenagers that have had disfiguring operations to save their lives. It is not safe at any dose.

In brief: Every chew releases

Carcinogens; the cancer may take years to appear after a single exposure.
There are teenagers that have had disfiguring operations to save their lives. It is not safe at any dose.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
Dr. Joseph Woods
Pathology

In brief: It varies, but long.

Alcohol use and tobacco use are the main risk factors for oral cancer.
Most are seen in patients over 50 years of age. Oral cavity lesions present as nonhealing ulcers that are sometimes painful. So, usually, it takes a long time for this cancer to develop. But some people have it sooner, especially if they have too much tobacco and/or alcohol. Talk to your doctor about stopping tobacco use.

In brief: It varies, but long.

Alcohol use and tobacco use are the main risk factors for oral cancer.
Most are seen in patients over 50 years of age. Oral cavity lesions present as nonhealing ulcers that are sometimes painful. So, usually, it takes a long time for this cancer to develop. But some people have it sooner, especially if they have too much tobacco and/or alcohol. Talk to your doctor about stopping tobacco use.
Dr. Joseph Woods
Dr. Joseph Woods
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Ed Friedlander
It is not politically correct to say this, but chewing tobacco is much, much, much safer than smoking it. Very few chewers get oral cancer, but it's a grim disease. Most often, it's preceded by white or red premalignant lesions that you or your dentist would be likely to notice where you keep your chew.
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