8 doctors weighed in:
Diabetes and hemoglobin. Is there any relationship between diabetes and anemia/hemoglobin?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. David Masiello
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Diabetes affects the kidneys.
The kidneys produce a hormone erytropoetin which stimulates the bone marrow to produce red cells. As kidney function declines the kidney ability to produce erytropoetin declines, leading to less red cells, anemia.

In brief: Yes
Diabetes affects the kidneys.
The kidneys produce a hormone erytropoetin which stimulates the bone marrow to produce red cells. As kidney function declines the kidney ability to produce erytropoetin declines, leading to less red cells, anemia.
Dr. David Masiello
Dr. David Masiello
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Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Two ways. First, some diabetics develop "anemia of chronic disorders", an anemia caused by release of a hormone called hepcidin.
Second, the hormone most responsible for blood production, erythropoietin, is made in the kidney. If the kidney is damaged by diabetes, the production of erythropoietin falls, and this results in fewer red blood cells being made, which causes anemia.

In brief: Yes
Two ways. First, some diabetics develop "anemia of chronic disorders", an anemia caused by release of a hormone called hepcidin.
Second, the hormone most responsible for blood production, erythropoietin, is made in the kidney. If the kidney is damaged by diabetes, the production of erythropoietin falls, and this results in fewer red blood cells being made, which causes anemia.
Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Dr. Martin Rubenstein
Thank
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