12 doctors weighed in:

Amblyopia. Is it a brain problem with normal eyeballs?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Paul
Ophthalmology
4 doctors agree

In brief: Essentially, yes

Amblyopia is defined as poor vision in the setting of a structurally normal appearing eye.
Most common causes are misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or a significant difference in the refractive state (near-sightedness or farsightedness) between the eyes. Prognosis for treatment, with glasses, patching of tyhe stronger eye, eyedrops, or a combination of these modalities is very good.

In brief: Essentially, yes

Amblyopia is defined as poor vision in the setting of a structurally normal appearing eye.
Most common causes are misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or a significant difference in the refractive state (near-sightedness or farsightedness) between the eyes. Prognosis for treatment, with glasses, patching of tyhe stronger eye, eyedrops, or a combination of these modalities is very good.
Dr. Jeffrey Paul
Dr. Jeffrey Paul
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3 doctors agree

In brief: Can be...

...But usually due to unequal vision in the two eyes; the weaker eye is then ignored by the brain and loses even more vision.

In brief: Can be...

...But usually due to unequal vision in the two eyes; the weaker eye is then ignored by the brain and loses even more vision.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
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Dr. John Kim
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: No.

Amblyopia is a connection problem between the eye and the brain.
Eye itself is normal and the brain is normal but the connection between the two were not fully made during the early childhood years.

In brief: No.

Amblyopia is a connection problem between the eye and the brain.
Eye itself is normal and the brain is normal but the connection between the two were not fully made during the early childhood years.
Dr. John Kim
Dr. John Kim
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Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics

In brief: Yes and no

Look at it this way.
Two eyeballs are 2 video cameras.They send similar video's to the brain that are offset just enough to give you depth perception.As long as the image quality is good for both, the brain is happy.Of one image is poor or lined up in a way that the 2 images are widely offset (double vision) the brain is not happy and eventually turns off one (bad) camera. This is amblyopia.

In brief: Yes and no

Look at it this way.
Two eyeballs are 2 video cameras.They send similar video's to the brain that are offset just enough to give you depth perception.As long as the image quality is good for both, the brain is happy.Of one image is poor or lined up in a way that the 2 images are widely offset (double vision) the brain is not happy and eventually turns off one (bad) camera. This is amblyopia.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
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