I have tooth pain but no sensitivity to cold/hot water?

Decay or other. Decay can lead to sense from hot/cold but you can have decay and not have the sense as well. Another possibility is you may have a necrotic (dead) tooth that is causing inflammatoin and pain is derived from the bone. Tooth would need a root canal if that were the case. See your dentist for care.
See A Dentist ASAP. Temporarily use something like tylenol (acetaminophen). Any anti-inflammatory medication can help. Aleve, motrin, advil and even a holistic alternative arnica. Ice to minimize swelling can also be helpful. That is only managing the pain... I agree with the other doctors. Please see a dentist to help you resolve the issue which is causing you pain. Make an appointment asap please.
Caries. The tooth pain needs to be evaluated not only to for pain relief but to prevent further damage to the tooth such as from a cavity. Sensitivity to hot and cold is usually due to periodontal disease exposing the root. Please consult your dentist, even if you can treat the pain with over the counter medications.
Disease. There is a pathological reason for the pain. See your dentist before it become worse.

Related Questions

I have an intense tooth pain and sensitivity to cold after getting cavitities filled. What can be going on? Its been 2 weeks already.

Tooth sensitivity. Sensitivity to cold is often dependent on the type of filling material used. Silver fillings are often sensitive for several weeks, especialy if the are large and/or deep. Cold sensitivity is also often a result if a filling is too high. Check back with your dentist. If the filling is high, it just needs a simple adjustment. Read more...
Call your dentist. You may still experience post operative sensitivity. However, to be save please see the dentist to test your tooth nerve. Read more...
Be patient. A tooth may be sensitive to cold is fairly common and might last for several weeks after you get a new filling. If this pain persists longer than 3 weeks, you should contact your dentist. Read more...
Filling pain. New fillings especially when they are deep, large or are amalgam fillings that conduct hot/cold sensation can cause the nerve of the tooth to be sensitized for awhile. Two weeks is a long time but I have seen it last for months in some cases. However, it is best to speak to your own dentist. If the pain is getting worse, it might require a sedative filling to be placed or Root Canal Therapy. Read more...

Tooth pain+sensitivity to cold. Had a filling a month ago. Xrays looked fine today. Cold air hurt on tooth too. What else could be causing this pain?

Not uncommon or.... It's not uncommon to have some sensitivity for awhile following a new filling, and more likely to occur with deep, large, and amalgam filling. Other possible causes are gum recession exposing the root surface and the bite being slightly off. It should be getting better rather that worse or the same over time. If not, return to your dentist to have check it out or some other adjacent tooth problem. Read more...
Possibly pulpitis. Some sensitivity after a recent restoration is not abnormal such as fleeting thermanal sensitivity. Howevefr if you have unstimulated pain or are awakened from sound sleep by tooth pain you should return to your dentist or contact an endodontist. Read more...
Tooth pain. Whenever you drill a tooth, it causes trauma to the nerve which causes inflammation (pulpitis). It can take between 6-8weeks for the inflammation to subside. When you have a filling placed on a tooth, the pain/cold sensitivity should decrease over the weeks which is called reversible pulpitis. If the pain stays the same or increases, you have irreversible pulpitis and may need a root canal. Read more...
Root canal. If tooth pain persists, you may have irreversible pulpitis which would require root canal. Keep in touch with dentist to help decide course of action. Read more...