3 doctors weighed in:

Can chronic hypokalemia lead to kidney disease? If yes, what is the cure? Thank you.

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jack Rubin
Internal Medicine - Nephrology & Dialysis
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Hypokalemia

If you suffer from chronic hypokalemia (HK), you need to find the cause.
One of the more common causes is due to low magnesium levels. HK will not be corrected until the potassium (K) is. Other causes of HK are diarrhea and a distal tubular acidosis. See a physician and find out the cause of your HK and you may feel better with a normal K level. HK rarely causes any kidney disease. Good luck.

In brief: Hypokalemia

If you suffer from chronic hypokalemia (HK), you need to find the cause.
One of the more common causes is due to low magnesium levels. HK will not be corrected until the potassium (K) is. Other causes of HK are diarrhea and a distal tubular acidosis. See a physician and find out the cause of your HK and you may feel better with a normal K level. HK rarely causes any kidney disease. Good luck.
Dr. Jack Rubin
Dr. Jack Rubin
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
I agree -- finding cause is essential - and remediating the root cause is essential too.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

"hypokalemia, especially if persistent, can induce a variety of changes in renal function, impairing tubular transport and possibly inducing chronic tubulointerstitial disease and cyst formation [1-6].
" from www.Uptodate.Com. The cure: take potassium supplements or potassium-sparing drugs like ace-inhibitors or aldosterone antagonists.

In brief: Yes

"hypokalemia, especially if persistent, can induce a variety of changes in renal function, impairing tubular transport and possibly inducing chronic tubulointerstitial disease and cyst formation [1-6].
" from www.Uptodate.Com. The cure: take potassium supplements or potassium-sparing drugs like ace-inhibitors or aldosterone antagonists.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
nice response.
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
Internal Medicine

In brief: Hypokalemia

When chronic, low potassium can damage nephron structures and change their function.
This is rare but observed in animal research and has been reported in humans. The remedy is higher intake of potassium by food or tablets or both, to prevent this from happening. The nephron injury can reverse at least partially. Scar is rare from hypokalemia.

In brief: Hypokalemia

When chronic, low potassium can damage nephron structures and change their function.
This is rare but observed in animal research and has been reported in humans. The remedy is higher intake of potassium by food or tablets or both, to prevent this from happening. The nephron injury can reverse at least partially. Scar is rare from hypokalemia.
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
Dr. Rex Mahnensmith
Thank
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