I'm pregnant with my 2nd child and suffering depression. Does that mean I will have postpartum depression too?

There Is Risk. You are at increased risk of continuing to struggle with depression after giving birth. It is important to stay in close contact with the provider working with you on your depression.
Possibly. U want your obstetrician & psychiatrist 2 work together 2 try 2 control your depression.

Related Questions

Can pregnancy sleep patterns indicate the future onset postpartum depression?

No. Generally, no. Pregnancy does cause sleep related problems, most notably due to discomfort and/or anxiety, and this can increase problems with depression. After delivery, sleep deprivation can add to this. Good mental health includes personal time, exercise and nutrition and deficiencies in any one do increase your risk. Read more...
Not necessarily. I need to have more information what you mean. If you aren't able to sleep (insomnia or early morning wakening with difficulty falling back to sleep) that may be a sign that some depression is starting. However, many pregnant women may have difficulty getting comfortable especially as they get larger or have to awaken to use the bathroom. So i would advise you to discuss this with your ob-gyne. Read more...

Can postpartum depression be prevented if it occurred in previous pregnancy?

Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. You know what you've experienced. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn for help to, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck! Read more...
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle. Read more...

I feel like I'm going thru postpartum depression again. Is that normal after 2nd high-risk pregnancy?

No. Post partum depression, particularly if it is severe, is never normal. You should check with your doctor. Read more...
It's common. Postpartum depression is common for women who have experienced it before. Consider exploring support through your OB, psychiatrist, psychologist, mommy and me class. Postpartum international is a good resource. Read more...

What happens if postpartum depression is depression after pregnancy, what is depression during pregnancy called?

Depression. Some people only have depression problems after a pregnancy, possibly increased risk because of the hormone changes. Some people have depression at other times, not due to a particular cause. If a woman is on antidepressants when she gets pregnant, she should talk with her doctor about the risks of taking them or not taking them during the pregnancy. Read more...

I suffer from anxiety/depression and am 20 weeks pregnant. Will I likely have postpartum depression?

See below. Since you already have depression, you will certainly have an increased risk of developing postpartum depression. Discuss this with your obstetrician and psychiatrist. And, educate yourself about postpartum depression, and have a plan for obtaining help. Read more...
You are at risk. Not necessarily, but you are at increased risk for postpartum depression. It would be good to be aware of the symptoms of ppd, so you can get help if you begin to experience symptoms. Also, if symptoms begin during pregnancy, contact a mental health specialist w perinatal expertise. Read more...

If I am still not over the baby blues after two months, does that mean I have postpartum depression?

No. Not neccesarily, but not something you should ignore either. Post-partum depression does take into account how long symptoms are present, but also how severe and life-altering these symptoms are. There are lots of screening tests you can use online, and if these are positive, you need to talk to your own doctor or pediatrician for futher evaluation and help. This is very treatable - ask for help! Read more...
No. Baby blues can simply be adjustment to a whole new way of life and/or prolonged hormonal imbalance. First contact your ob/gyn. If you are interested in integrative therapies, craniosacral therapy and acupuncture/traditional chinese medicine have a lot to offer that bring you relief. Check your area for practitioners. Read more...
Likely. Baby blues only lasts from a few days to three weeks. Beyond three weeks it is likely either an adjustment disorder or postpartum depression. You should seek an evaluation from a mental health professional who has expertise in diagnosing postpartum disorders. Read more...
YES. The baby blues only last the first 2 weeks after birth. If you continue to have or have developed significant changes in your mood, energy, sleep, enjoyment, fluctuations in these or anxiety or feeling not like yourself, you likely have "ppd". Seek an expert through www.Postpartum.Net, or you may write me through healthtap to answer ?'s, find you a specialist near you. Read more...
Maybe. You may very well have a clinical depression, or you may be fatigued, or have some other condition. Get checked by your gynecologist, and perhaps your family physician for depression, thyroid, diabetes, and other common ailments. They may not be certain, but you don't want to be unnecessarily ill when you have a newborn. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...