9 doctors weighed in:
My 6mo old girl wheezes really bad but doc said its not actual wheezing but didn't do anything to help, what could it be?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. Alan Greene
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree
In brief: Tracheomalacia?
Wheezing is the noise made by narrow or swollen small airways in the lungs.
Some babies have noisy breathing for a different reason, such as a main breathing tube that hasn't grown stiff yet (tracheomalacia). The main thing to do when your doc says noisy breathing isn't wheezing, is ask what it is, and what, if anything, should be done. Often it's safe and will be outgrown without doing anything.

In brief: Tracheomalacia?
Wheezing is the noise made by narrow or swollen small airways in the lungs.
Some babies have noisy breathing for a different reason, such as a main breathing tube that hasn't grown stiff yet (tracheomalacia). The main thing to do when your doc says noisy breathing isn't wheezing, is ask what it is, and what, if anything, should be done. Often it's safe and will be outgrown without doing anything.
Dr. Alan Greene
Dr. Alan Greene
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Dr. Alfredo Garcia
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: Wheezing
The "wheezing' sound you hear may not be coming from her lungs but from her nose if she is congested.
If she has a bark-like cough and a hoarse voice, the sound could be stridor caused by croup. In any event, if your baby is wheezing, having fast and problem breathing and difficulty taking her bottle, she should be reevaluated because she may need nebulizer treatments. Seek a second opinion.

In brief: Wheezing
The "wheezing' sound you hear may not be coming from her lungs but from her nose if she is congested.
If she has a bark-like cough and a hoarse voice, the sound could be stridor caused by croup. In any event, if your baby is wheezing, having fast and problem breathing and difficulty taking her bottle, she should be reevaluated because she may need nebulizer treatments. Seek a second opinion.
Dr. Alfredo Garcia
Dr. Alfredo Garcia
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1 comment
Dr. Alfredo Garcia
Your daughters' condition is most probably laryngotracheomalacia or underdeveloped cartilage of the vocal cords, windpipe and bronchial tubes, which disappear when a child grows older.
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Dr. Jonathan Jassey
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