Considering the heart need for oxygen, can exercise be helpful to both stable and unstable angina patient?

exercise is medicine. The heart extracts the same amount of oxygen at rest or exercise. What the heart needs is more flow which is why blocked up arteries cause chest pain/heart attacks. One way to increase flow is to exercise to build up the bodies ability to recruit blood flow when needed. You should not exercise while you have unstable angina until it is controlled though. In stable angina exercise it great.

Related Questions

Could one or more explain unstable angina as I lived a long time with it not suspecting heart decease?

Changing symptoms. Unstable angina usually refers to new chest pain, pain with less activity than before or pain that doesnt go away with rest or usual nitrates. It represents a change in the plaques in your heart and is usually very serious. I doubt you have unstable angina, more likely you have stable angina. Angina is a symptom reflective of atherosclerotic heart disease which means you have it. Read more...

What exactly does "noncritical disease" of "up to 20 percent" mean on heart cath report? Why would this be low risk for heart attack/unstable angina?

Blood flow. For a stenosis to be significant, it has to affect blood flow. That does not occur until the stenosis reaches about 70%, at which point it is considered critical. Lesions around 50% are high risk due to potential risk for sudden occlusion. Lesions in the 20% range, when followed proved to be low risk. You should not have angna from this lesion, and it doesn't normally cause a heart attack. Read more...
Low % narrowing. At 50% diameter or 75% area narrowing there is a reduction f flow which is then a critical stenosis and may lead to ischemia of the end organ such as heart, brain, kidney etc. Read more...
Not hemodynamically . Significant, however, this does not mean no risk as 2/3 heart attacks are caused by blockages less than 50%. Talk to your physician about reducing your long term risk as you do have heart disease. Read more...

Do unstable angina attacks damage my heart? Does my nitro help to prevent damage?

Unstable angina. means you are in danger of having a heart attack. It is actually a medical emergency. If you meant "stable" angina, then no the attacks don't necessarily cause damage because blood flow is predictably restored with rest before any damage occurs. That's why it is called "stable" - the disease extent is known, and symptoms go away with rest. Nitro helps dilate the blood vessels to improve flow. Read more...

After a heart cath I was told by the Dr. That I don't have blockages. But the discharge diagnosis was CAD with unstable angina. Can that be right?

Correct. Unstable angina is an acute coronary syndrome defined by the absence of myocardial damage. Coronary artery disease is usually present, but blockages do NOT have to exist. An EKG typically shows ST segment depression and T-wave inversion, but may also be normal. Long-term mgmt incl. reduction of risk factors via diet, lifestyle, and medication. If confused about your diagnosis, talk to your doctor. Read more...

Do patients with untreated stable angina develop unstable angina leading to myocardial infarction?

Depends. Patients with stable angina (sa) have by definition coronary artery disease. This puts them at increased risk of developing an acute myocardial infarction. However, recent studies looking at the use of current medicnes have shown them to be very effective in treating sa. Additionaly, coronary intervention (placing stents, for example) has not been shown to prevent heart attacks in patients with sa. Read more...
Depends. On level of medical treatment. But, yes unstable angina and acs can affect any one. Read more...

Wondering about vagoglossopharangeal neuralgia? Do patients ever report symptoms v similar to stable angina/heart conditions but neg cardiac work-ups and clear arteries?

GPN. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (gpn) is also called vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia. It is characterized by brief but intense pain on one side of the throat, which may radiate within the mouth or into the ear. Attacks are described as sharp, stabbing or burning in quality. They may occur spontaneously or be provoked by talking, chewing, swallowing, coughing and yawning. It can mimick angina pain. Read more...
Unusual. It would be unusual for this to cause chest pain. Usually it involves areas like the throat, ear, jaw, etc. I have, however, seen cases of chest pain caused by pinched nerves in the spine. I would consider an MRI of the spine if cardiac workup is negative. Read more...