Related Questions

Do I have to get some blood tests before doing a laser treatment of leg veins?

No blood tests. Lasers can be used to treat leg spider veins, although sclerotherapy is usually more effective. No blood test is needed before spider vein laser treatment. Endovenous laser ablation can be used as an alternative to stripping to treat underlying veins such as the great saphenous. In this situation, a blood test might be indicated if there was concern about an underlying risk for blood clots. Read more...
It Depends. First, it depends upon which type of laser treatment you are referring to: treatment of superficial spider veins vs endovenous ablation of incompetent superficial veins. For the former, likely not necessary. Before endovenous ablation, depends on a patient's comorbidities, current medications (e.g. Warfarin). For specific recommendations for you, consult with your primary physician. Read more...
Not usually. For most people, there is no need for routine blood testing before laser treatment for varicose veins. The only exception to that would be if you have had a personal history that is suggestive of abnormal blood clotting, if you have a strong family history of blood clotting in close relatives, or if you know that there is a thrombophilia (blood clotting disorder) that runs in your family. Read more...
It depends. Possibly no tests but if you are to undergo anesthesia some basic tests such as a pregnancy test, if female, may be required . Read more...
Usually not. For spider veins on the skin nothing is necessary. For laser treatment to close the refluxing valves and remove the varicose veins, I do not routinely get blood tests even with patients on blood thinners. I do obtain a baseline ekg on anyone over 40. The endovenous technique is done under tumescent anesthesia and, therefore, the patient is awake. It would be rare to obtain blood tests. Read more...
Rarely. Blood test depend on the treatment being considered and medical history. For endovenous laser treatment usually no test are necessary. Occasionally patients with risk factors for a DVT may need blood test to better understand their risk because the laser treatment has a very s small risk of dvt. For surface laser treatments and sclerotherapy of spider veins blood test are almost never needed. Read more...

Can laser treatment completely cure varicose veins?

No. There is no complete cure for varicose veins. Is a chronic recurrent disease. Best prevention is compression therapy. Laser, phlebectomy, sclerotherapy are used for specific forms of varicose veins. Read more...
Not completely. Endovenous laser ablation is one of the tools used now-a-days to treat varicose veins. Many patients that is all what they need and do well for many years. Other patients with more advanced vein disease need other additional treatment modalities to complete the treatment. However venous disease is for the most part a progressive condition and most patients will need more treatments after sometime. Read more...
Disagree. In our clinic we have treated over 4000 patients and rarely a single laser ablation of a saphenous vein achieves complete cure of the disease. Most patients will need in addition to sonographic evaluation either sclerotherapy, phlebectomy and most will require compression with stockings ( patients refuse to wear them). Read more...
No. There is no complete cure for varicose veins. Varicose veins are caused by a chronic genetically inherited disorder. Endovenous laser ablation treats the underlying cause but the disorder almost always returns at some point. Best prevention is compression therapy. Laser, phlebectomy, sclerotherapy are used for specific forms of varicose veins. Read more...
Sometimes. Since most people suffering from varicose veins have an isolated genetic valve problem involving their saphenous vein that results in the varicose veins, the condition can often be completely cured by treating the saphenous vein w/ thermal ablation or surgery. Other individuals, though, have predisposition to multiple veins in their legs having problems, including perforators or surface branches. Read more...

Is it normal to need a laser treatment of leg veins?

Leg vein treatment. Using a laser on leg veins is one treatment. It may work better on smaller veins. Larger veins may require surgical removal and others can respond well to sclerotherapy. A evaluation by someone who treats leg veins (dermatologist, plastic surgeon, vascular or general surgeon) would tell you what might be best for any given patient. Read more...
Sometimes. As dr. Shenenberger said there are many ways to treat leg veins. Laser is just one of them. The real answer is that it depends on what kind of vein trouble needs to be treated. For larger veins that are below the skin, laser, rf and surgery are possibilities. It is important that you see any experienced physician who specializes in vein disease--a phlebologist--for the answers you need. Read more...
Very common. Need a trial of conservative treatment with pressure stockings. If this fails and symptoms continue, then laser can help. Read more...
Yes, if reflux. There are two kinds of laser treatments of leg veins-topical and endovenous(inside the vein). Although a laser can be done on spider veins, most vein specialists would recommend sclerotherapy as a first line treatment. Endovenous laser is the gold standard to treat the leaking(refluxing) valves usually of the saphenous veins. This can be determined by a venous reflux ultrasound. Read more...

Is there a shot or an i.V. Involved when doing a laser treatment of leg veins?

Usually not. Laser treatment of leg veins is somewhat uncomfortable, but not intolerable. It is common to use ice or some other form of cooling applied to the treated areas, both before and after for comfort; and it works well. In any case the discomfort of the treatment does not last long. Read more...
Varicose veins. When ablating larger veins with a laser, such as the greater saphenous vein, i give my patients IV sedation and infiltrate around the vein with anesthetic to make the procedure more comfortable. Still outpatient procedure. Read more...
Either or & more. It can involve any of the above plus the use of lasers or intense pulsed light or infra red therapy. Read more...
There are options. There are a few ways that veins can be treated on the leg. If they are smaller than 2 mm (usually known as spider veins) they can be successfully treated with a laser and no injections. If the veins are larger they must be treated with injections to avoid serious complications. I suggest that my patients also seek out a vein specialist that has an ultrasound to look for "feeder" veins. Read more...
It all depends ... On what needs to be treated and how it is to be done. Sometimes, nothing is needed. Sometimes, some local anesthetic in the form of a shot is used. Sometimes, IV sedation is used (but this generally isn't necessary). Read more...
IV not necessary. Laser treatment of spider veins is done only with a topical anesthetic or no anesthetic at all. Laser treatment of varicose veins involves sealing the leaking valves with the laser followed by microincisions to remove the varicose veins. This requires no IV but does require several needle insertions along the veins to numb them. This is called tumescent anesthesia. It is very well tolerated. Read more...

Will I get any medicine for pain when I go for the laser treatment of leg veins?

Depends... On what type of veins are being treated and what treatment you will be receiving. During endovenous ablation of saphenous/perforator veins, doctors use tumescent local anesthesia in areas to be treated in order to keep them numb & protected from heat generated by the laser/rf device. Anesthetic is generally not necessary for sclerotherapy to treat spider veins; patients tolerate injections well. Read more...
Yes and no. As dr. Rosen said, it will depend on what you are having done. If you have surgery or an endovenous thermal procedure, you will get an anesthetic during the procedure so that you won't feel anything. Sometimes a small amount of anesthetic is also given during sclerotherapy too but not always. The amount of pain you will have afterwards should be minimal and Ibuprofen is usually all you will need. Read more...
Medical laser yes. Sometimes a topical cream is used like Emla (lidocaine and prilocaine) or Lidocaine creme before the cosmetic superficial laser for tiny red spider veins plus a cooling gel. But sometimes the laser hurts more because the laser is being used to treat too large of skin veins: ie: dark blue or purple veins that is better suited to sclerotherapy. Read more...
For closure yes. With endovenous closure with laser or radio frequency i give 1mgm Ativan (lorazepam) and one advil 1/2 hour before the procedure. Post procedure i recommend advil, Motrin or ibuprofen. For topical laser for spider veins i usually use nothing or very rarely Ativan (lorazepam) or advil. Read more...

Do I have to see a specialist to get a laser treatment of leg veins ordered?

Leg veins. Laser treatments for the legs are deemed usually cosmetic and are not covered by insurance. Seeing a vein specialist, vascular surgeon as well as a cosmetic medicine specialist can take care of your problems. Read more...
Leg vein treatment. As dr. Patel said, you should see a specialist who would actually recommend and perform the treatment that is best suited to your needs. Read more...
Your doctor. Can order venous insufficiency ultrasound. If abnormal then you can be referred to a vein specialist to discuss your treatment options. Evlt not always best option. Read more...
See a specialist. Veins are treated by many specialists including plastic surgeons, dermatologists, general surgeons, vascular surgeons and phlebologists or vein specialists. Since 2008 the am. Board of phlebology has a board certification with the designation diplomate of the am.Board of phlebology. I would recommend that you see either a diplomate of this board or a vascular surgeon with interests in vein care. Read more...
YES. A specialist that is best qualified to treat varicose veins & other vein diseases is a board-certified vascular surgeon. They are the only vein specialist that has formal fellowship training in vein surgery & vein interventions. They have undergone 7 years of university surgery training. Make sure they are board-certified in vascular surgery & check their reputation with you primary doctor first. Read more...

Which is better to get rid of spider veins: sclerotherapy or laser treatment?

Sclerotherapy. Sclerotherapy is still better than laser. Laser might be helpfull for the very small and spread spider veins. If the spider veins are connected and larger than 1/2 mm, sclerotherapy is superior. Read more...
Sclerotherapy & lase. We found that laser did not penetrate deep enough to close the blue-green feeder veins in the reticular dermis reliably. So sclerotherapy needed to be done simultaneously. We concluded why not just do the sclerotherapy alone. Some advocates of both modalities feel that the "double injury" works better, however this is debatable. Alone, sclerotherapy is better. Read more...
Sclero. Is still considered the gold standard. My laser for veins is rarely used. Read more...
Depends. Spider veins on the face are probably best treated with laser although sclerotherapy works well too if the provider is experienced. Spider veins on the legs are best treated with sclerotherapy. Sometimes a combination of both is used on the legs, but sclerotherapy can treat veins of any size in the legs and laser is often not needed. Read more...
Sclerotherapy. Spider veins on the leg are best treated by sclerotherapy. Spider veins on the face can be treated by sclerotherapy, laser or fine needle radio frequency. The treatment of leg spider veins is usually determined by the training of the treating physician. Most vein specialists will treat leg spiders with sclerotherapy. Read more...
Sclerotherapy Best. Spider veins on the leg are best treated by sclerotherapy. Most vein specialists will treat leg spider veins with sclerotherapy because it not only treats the tiny spider veins but the slightly larger and slightly deeper veins that feed the spider veins. Lasers cannot treat the feeder veins and so cannot completely treat the problem. Read more...