Tennis elbow, should I apply heat then cold?

Cold. Cold always takes down any inflammation, numbs the skin nerves and generally makes it feel better. But you should receive physical therapy, so that the problem does not recur.

Related Questions

Tennis elbow cold wraps or heat?

Cold . For lateral epicondylitis(tennis elbow) cold wraps are more effective when they are hurting as they vasoconstrict the blood vessels to the area and thus decrease swelling. Heat may feel better temporarily but the vasodilation(increased blood flow) that it allows sometimes causes more swelling, then more pain...Good luck! Read more...

Is heat or cold better for tennis elbow?

Cold. Rice = rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Tendinitis results from a muscle strain, micro-tears from over use. Use ice wraps or ice massage regularly to relieve discomfort. Stretch multiple times a day. As it heals then add strengthening (therabar is excellent). Also consider a restraint band to limit over use as it's healing, but don't use long term. Finally, improve tennis stroke mechanics. Read more...
Rest & ice are best. Tennis elbow is inflammation of the tendons in the elbow or tendonitis. This usually improves with rest and ice. Once the condition settles down, doing exercises to strengthen the forearm will help decrease the strain on the tendons and help prevent the condition from recurring. Read more...

What can I do about tennis elbow?

Tennis Elbow. If you have been diagnosed by a competent doc., then you should know that it might take while before it go away. Elbow band is otc and helps to promote healing, some anti inflammatory such as Ibuprofen also might help. Some occassion you may need cortison shot at the site. Read more...

How can I cure tennis elbow fast?

Ice. Icing the affected area 3-4 times/day. Stretch and strengthen the elbow/forearm muscles. You may need to see an athletic trainer or physical terapist, to be shown the correct exercises. Read more...

What will help heal tennis elbow?

Many things. Rest the elbow. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (motrin). Medicines. Equipment check , see the equipment you use may be to adjusted. Physical therapy. Brace. Steroid injections. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Sugery. Read more...

How can I cure my painful tennis elbow?

Bracing. For tennis elbow, try wrapping your arm and elbow with a pillow or blanket at night to create padding protection and a make-shift brace to limit elbow flexion while you sleep. Keeping the arm semi-straight, padded, and to your side at night allows the tendons involved to start the healing process. Read more...
Rest and Modificatio. You can try to rest the arm, avoid activities that put the elbow on complete extension. When lifting or pulling, keep the elbow bent slightly. A counterforce arm brace can help. They're often sold in the tennis and golf section of sporting goods stores. Nsaids can help as well. Cases that dont respond to conservative therapy are candidates for surgery. Read more...

Can you completely recover from tennis elbow?

Yes. My usual treatment is stepwise. First, antiinflammatories, exercises or physical therapy, tennis elbow braces, and activity modification is used. Next, i will offer a cortisone injection. After this, i will offer a second cortisone injection or even prp (platelet-rich plasma). Finally, if all of these treatment modalities fail, i will offer a minimally-invasive lateral elbow release. Read more...
Yes. Vast majority of patients with tennis elbow make a complete recovery. However, you must be patient. Recovery may take up to a year, or occasionally longer. Less than 10% need surgery. Read more...
Yes. Tennis elbow is usually a self limiting condition but it can persist for many months (sometimes greater than a year) for those with severe symptoms, treatment can be helpful and may include: anti-inflammatory medication, physical or occupational therapy, braces, prp injections or even surgery. Read more...

Can you get tennis elbow from lifting things?

Yes. Tennis elbow is considered a overuse injury. That means that the rate of tissue injury exceeds the body's ability to heal it. The tissue breakdown is cumulative, resulting in chronic pain. Patients typically complain olateral elbow pain, worse with grasping with palm facing down. Read more...