I have such trouble falling asleep at night when sleep alone?

Sleep hygiene. Make it a lifetime habit: 1) Keep a regular sleep schedule (same time in/out of bed), 2) quiet, dark room - no TV/music, 3) use bedroom only for sleep/marital relations, 4) if no sleep in 20min, leave room until sleepy, then try again (repeat as needed), 5) No caffeine after noon/no alcohol at bedtime,6) Write worries in a journal by bedside, & deal with them next day.

Related Questions

I have trouble falling asleep at night and staying asleep. I'm 21 years old, I do have emetophobia, but I don't know if that is why I can't sleep.

Sleep Hygiene is Key. 1.Keep regular bed & wakening time (even weekends). Get up same time daily. 2. Use regular, relaxing bedtime routine: warm bath / shower, aromatherapy, reading, or listening to gentle music. 3. Sleep in dark, quiet, cool room w comfy mattress & pillows. 4. Bedroom only for sleep & sex. Put work materials, computers, & TVs in another room. 5. Finish eating at least 2-3 hrs prior to bed. Read more...

I have trouble falling asleep at night, and when I do I sleep 13 hours and still crave long naps during the day. I usually feel fatigued all day.?

Depression or Apnea. Depression or sleep apnea are the two major causes of these symptoms. Depression is more likely because of the difficulty you report in falling asleep and having non-restorative sleep. Talk with your primary care physician and depending on what he/she says ask for a referral to a sleep center for a study or a mental health professional for an evaluation. Read more...
Insomnia . For proper "sleep hygiene, " one should try to go to bed about the same time every night, get up at the same time every morning and avoid naps. Caffeine may interfere with one's sleeping patterns. If you continue to have problems you should visit a physician. Good luck. Read more...
Many possibilities. I'd suggest seeing your doctor for more detailed discussion and evaluation. Considerations include anxiety/depression, various sleep disorders, sleep apnea, rls, poor sleep hygiene, among others. As prev suggested, avoid naps, limit caffeine after 2p, consistent bed & awake times, no tv or reading in bed. Read more...
Not good. See you local doctor as many things can cause your symptoms, including thyroid problems. Once medical issues are addressed, you may need a sleep study and/or a thorough psychiatric evaluation. Read more...
Insomnia + fatigue. Sleep problem + non-recuperative sleep + constant fatigue are the main symptoms of the depressive syndrome ( depression). There are more symptoms that you may not pay attention to but may recognize once you know what are the other symptoms. Search " how to diagnose depression". Call your doctor if you have a lot of the mentioned sx. Treat early, recover faster. Read more...
In addition to Dr. Dai's excellent answer, insomnia itself can precipitate depression. You may need to see a sleep medicine doc in addition to a psychiatrist. Read more...

What is the medical term for a doctor who specialises in sleep disorders I have trouble falling asleep at night and was curious?

Respiratory Tx. A national board for respiratory care sleep disorder specialist passes rigorous tests and works under a md. This is more for sleep apnea - but insomnia may also be treated in a sleep clinic. Your gp can refer - even your phone book or pharmacist may help you find a resource. You are wise to seek a responsible referral. Good luck! Read more...
Sleep Disorder Spec. The doctor who performs sleep disorder diagnostic testing is usually a pulmonologist. Read more...
Sleep Specialists. American academy of sleep medicine (aasm) or american board of sleep medicine is the medical board that certifies doctors (neurologist, pulmonologist) as "board certified" in sleep medicine. Dentists who are treating sleep disorders with oral appliances are often members of the american academy of dental sleep medicine. Hope it helps. Read more...

Sleeping only 1-3 hours at a time, I don't have trouble falling asleep, but can't seem to stay asleep thru the night. Tried melatonin 1.5 didn't work.

Time for sleep doc. Please see a sleep specialist. Your insomnia is significant and with over 80 sleep disorders it will take a considerable history and some testing to sort it out. Sleep is extremely important and the lack of it can be both psychologically and physically damaging. Good luck to you! Read more...
Sleep. Best to see a sleep specialist. A sleep study may be needed to figure out what's happening, eg, sleep apnea, plms, parasomnias, etc. Proper sleep habits/hygiene are essential. Read more...

Is it okay to take melatonin every night to sleep? I have trouble falling asleep and I've been under alot of stress lately.

Yes. If it works for you, then you can take it every night to help you sleep. It is fairly safe and non-addicting. It may cause headache, dizziness and cramping. You should wait at least 4-5 hours before attempting to drive or operate machinery. You could also try learning deep breathing and muscle relaxation techniques from a therapist. There are apps that help you quiet your mind and meditate. Read more...

How do I sleep better at night? How can I sleep better at night? I already take sleeping pills nightly but they don't help. I have trouble falling asleep and then waking up dozens of times through out the night.

Not . Not sleeping well is a very frustrating condition. You may have already tried not drinking caffeine after noon, not exercising too close to bedtime, and not using your computer or tv within an hour of bedtime. Consider adding "white noise" such as a fan. Be sure that your room is cool and not overly warm. Eating light during the day, then having a larger meal at around 7 pm or so can be helpful. If these don't work, you may want to see your doctor or even a sleep specialist to discuss your situation. Read more...
Prevention. Not being able to sleep may indicated sleep problems that can be life shortening or life threatening. The only way to know if there are serious problems is with an overnight sleep test. I encourage you to seek help. Read more...

Can rhinoplasty influence sleep apnea? I am suffering from obstructive sleep apnea. Snoring at night and difficulty falling asleep are usual things for me. I am about to have a rhinoplasty. Could the change in the shape of my nose reduce my sleep apnea?

It . It is very unlikely that a rhinoplasty for cosmetic reasons will have any effect on sleep apnea. Read more...
Very unlikely. Rhinoplasty is performed to alter the external appearance of the nose, and can be combined with other procedures, such as septoplasty or turbinate surgery, to improve nasal breathing. It is very unlikely it will improve sleep apnea. Read more...
Possibly. Deviated septum and nasal valve deformity are common problems that can contribute to nasal obstruction and sleep apnea. Ask your surgeon if you have these problems and make sure they are aware you have sleep apnea. Read more...
Rhino, sleep apnea. Change in the shape of your nose will not do anything for your sleep apnea. However, if you have nasal obstruction and it is corrected at the same time with either septoplasty, turbinectomy or nasal valve surgery that will help tremendously. The other concern is the pressure of face or nose mask that you might be using for CPAP machine. If you do, then you have to avoid it for at least 3 weeks. Read more...
Unlikely. Usually weight loss, cpap, and possibly a palato uvuloplasty can help. You should have a sleep study if you have not already. Septorhinoplasty can help snoring but not sleep apnea per se. Read more...
Probably not. It is "possible" that the airway is improved during the procedure, but unless that was done on purpose, it will only have a cosmetic effect. You should see a team for your condition, starting with a sleep MD. CPAP may be a first method, then Oral Appliance Therapy from a trained sleep dentist, and then a surgical option. Many successful treatments include a combination of all. Read more...
Possibly. It all depends on the anatomical source of obstruction that leads to a type of apnea called a hypopnea that could be as result of UARS-upper airway resistance syndrome. If this is the case in your condition, then yes possibly can decrease your OSA. Read more...
Yes. Yes. Crooked nose and deviated septum can contribute to obstruction. Functional septorhinoplasty has a role in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. See ENT surgeon or facial plastic surgeon to discuss this. Read more...