3 doctors weighed in:
How does the body try to compensate for coronary ischemia by growing new vessels?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Michael Zevitz
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Good question
Through biochemical mechanisms stimulated by decreased blood flow to areas of the heart, small collateral arteries can form as branches of the larger coronary arteries in order to maintain as much blood supply to the heart as possible.
These collateral arteries can often prevent permanent damage to the heart, but they rarely normalize the blood flow necessary for normal heart function.

In brief: Good question
Through biochemical mechanisms stimulated by decreased blood flow to areas of the heart, small collateral arteries can form as branches of the larger coronary arteries in order to maintain as much blood supply to the heart as possible.
These collateral arteries can often prevent permanent damage to the heart, but they rarely normalize the blood flow necessary for normal heart function.
Dr. Michael Zevitz
Dr. Michael Zevitz
Thank
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Pediatrics - Cardiology
In brief: Cleverly!
Almost the same way we find side roads to drive around a traffic jam. In the presence of low concentrations of oxygen, local cells or tissues will produce chemicals (angiogenic hormones) that encourage the creation of extra-vessels that snake their way around blocked arteries.

In brief: Cleverly!
Almost the same way we find side roads to drive around a traffic jam. In the presence of low concentrations of oxygen, local cells or tissues will produce chemicals (angiogenic hormones) that encourage the creation of extra-vessels that snake their way around blocked arteries.
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Arnon Rubin
Board Certified, Internal Medicine
20 years in practice
162K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors