What is mild cognitive impairment?

Memory and thought. Mild cognitive impairment is difficulty in memory and ability to carry out thought processes- and although it's mild, there's can be some confusion involved. It's difficult to lay down new memories with cognitive impairment.
Early dementia. The diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (mci) is defined as impairment in one (and only one) cognitive domain. This is a new version of what had been called "isolated memory impairment." thought by some to be early signs of alzheimer's disease, mci is mild in nature and isolated to one area.

Related Questions

What is mild cognitive impairment or early dementia?

They aren't the same. Mci involves impairment in one area of brain functioning more than one would expect for your age and previous level of functioning. The impairment can be in memory, judgement, ability to reason or language. Some people who have mci will later develop dementia so it is thought of as a predementia state. Not everyone with mci will develop dementia. Read more...
MCI:memory loss only. In dementia, not only memory, but also judgment, language, and other aspects are impaired. Mild cognitive impairment (mci) is a mild worsening of memory without those other changes. Mci may or may not progress to dementia. With my patients, i look for reversible causes, do baseline memory testing and repeat a year later. Slow eeg or prolonged cognitive evoked potential may signal pre-dementia. Read more...
MCI. The most important point is that mci does not always progress to alzheimer's. On exam, a good psychiatrist or psychologist can pick up subtle changes in cognition. But does not rise to the level of dementia. Read more...

What is the difference between mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's?

Levels of impairment. Mild cognitive impairment (mci) means that there is one brain area that has problems. Having mci increases the risk of developing dementia. Some of those with mci will go on to develop alzheimers which is the most common type of dementia. Those with alzheimers have impairment in memory as well as at least one other area of brain functioning accompanied by loss of functioning in their life. Read more...
MCI-memory loss only. In dementia, not only memory, but also judgment, language, and other aspects are impaired. Mild cognitive impairment (mci) is a mild worsening of memory without those other changes. Mci may or may not progress to dementia. With my patients, i look for reversible causes, do baseline memory testing and repeat a year later. Slow eeg or prolonged cognitive evoked potential may signal pre-dementia. Read more...

Official website for mild cognitive impairment?

There is none. Dementia-related groups such as the alzheimer's association, huntington's disease association and many others deal with various degrees of cognitive impairment. There is no "official website". Read more...

Mild cognitive impairment. What exactly is this?

Explanation. "dementia" is a functional term. It refers to a person who has not been independent in activities of daily living (adls) for at least 3 consecutive months. Dementia has numerous possible causes (eg alzheimer's). Mci = unequivocal loss of faculties: memory, thinking, reasoning, insight, judgment, task completion, apraxia, etc without being as functionally impaired as a demented person. Read more...

I have had mild cognitive impairment for months, and now spiked a fever (however cheap themometer say temp is 96). are the two symptoms related?

Unlikely. If you do not have a reliable thermometer, then you cannot say that you've spiked a fever. Mild cognitive impairment, unless due to an abscess, encephalitis, or meningitis, is not likely to be related to an elevated body temperature. See your physician if your symptoms persist or get worse. You might be referred to a neurologist. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mildcognitiveimpairment.html. Read more...

Do anticholinergic medications like Benadryl (diphenhydramine) have a link with mild cognitive impairment?

No. Unlikely; Benadryl (diphenhydramine) has drowsy effects, but clears out after few hours. Interestingly can cause paradoxical stimulation as a side effect. A chronic mild cognitive impairment could be something else. Read more...
Possibly. For most people, Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and similar agents (used appropriately) will not cause any cognitive impairment. However, aging often leads to decreased brain mass and slowed removal of medications through the kidneys. As a result, they can lead to significant cognitive symptoms appearing as dementia or delirium. This should always be ruled out before considering other causes. Read more...

Has anyone here had experience with mild cognitive impairment (mci) patient and does it progress to Alzheimer's or not?

Yes and sometimes. All physicians and especially neurologists have experience with mild cognitive impairment. Some cases of mild cognitive impairment may progress into alzheimer's disease or any of the other neurodegenerative diseases that lead to dementia. Read more...
14% a year... Approximately 14% of patients diagnosed with amnestic mci progress into alzheimer disease every year. The progression rate of those diagnosed with non-amnestic mci into other diseases is less well-known and currently being researched by neuropsychologists and neurologists. Read more...
A few extra points. Mci is the first indication of a cognitive problem, and usually involves an only memory the amnestic mci pt can get alzheimer's about 90% in 10 yrs, but 10% stay ok. If the mci involves organizational skills, or awareness, or includes hallucinations, this group may develop parkinson's or frontotemporal dementia. Many doctors might use meds on mci pts early protectively. Read more...
Amyvid scan. The new Amyvid scans measures amyloid load and may be helpful in stratifying risk of mci conversion to alzheimer's. Read more...

How do I help my mom who is showing signs of depression or mild cognitive impairment?

See her PCP. It may be difficult to have your mother go to a geriatrician or psychiatrist, but probably easier to get her to see her primary care provider who may already have a relationship with her. The pcp can then evaluate and provide the appropriate treatments. If your mother resists seeing any professional, it would be good to start by expressing your concerns about her and engaging her. Read more...
Treatment. Help her to see her family doctor and accompany her to the appointment so the doctor knows your concerns. He/she can work to differentiate cognitive changes related to depression from those of early dementia (though some have both) your mother's physician can then make the appropriate referral for treatment if indicated. Read more...
A Checkup. Try and make an appt with her dr for a checkup. Often, lab tests can reveal some problems easily remedied, such as a low level of thyroid hormone. Sometimes medicines a person is receiving are the culprit and stopping them (under the doctor's supervision) can result in improvement. For example, certain blood pressure medications called beta blockers can cause depression and cognitive disturbances. Read more...