What is best for chronic sinusitis? Allega d, Claritin (loratadine) d or zyrtec d

Probably neither. The medications that you describe are all antihistamines. They rarely are effective in eradicating an inflammation that has been present for 3 months (definition of chronic sinusitis). Even if allergy is part of your problem, these medications are not very effective. A better anti-inflammatory drug that might help temporarily is prednisone.
Best allergy med. Hello, all the medications you mentioned are otc antihistamines. Each one works in allergy and some people prefer one over the other. Treatments for chronic sinusitis may include antibiotics, steroids, nasal sprays, mucolytics, saline irrigation, decongestants and antihistamines. If there is an allergy component to the sinusitis, then any of these may be helpful.

Related Questions

Used to take Claritin (loratadine) d daily. Dr dx is chronic sinusitis. Said try Zyrtec & flunisolide spray. Tried 6 days so far & am so congested. What to do?

May need abx. Chronic sinusitis requires more intensive and prolonged antibiotic treatment often accompanied by a short course of steroid. Even then, the result is about 50% successful. Call your doctor again and perhaps consider seeing an ENT specialist/allergist re. the problem. Read more...

What is the best way to clear ear congestion? Claritin, (loratadine) zyrtec-d, and Neti Pot did not help. I have allergy-like congestion, but can not clear left ear

Maybe steroids. Your eustachian tube may be congested. It might be time to see an ENT for consideration of either nasal steroids or a tapered dose of oral steroids. In the interim you may also consider using afrin nasal spray 2 sprays each nostril twice a day for only three days. Combine this with gently trying to clear your ears by pinching your nose shut gently and blowing against the closed nose. Read more...

My Dr. Recom. Claritin (loratadine) D for my bad allergies and sinusitis. I think it's not helping and I'm not reacting well to it. Ok to stop? Start zyrtec again?

Whatever works better. some people respond differently to different medications, although in your case I recommend that you would see an allergist for evaluation, check out aaaai.org or acaai.org for an allergist in your area, good luck. Read more...

Dx w/ chronic sinusitis. Dr says try Zyrtec (cetirizine) & flunisolide 2 wks minimum & wait on allergy tests. F/u appt in May. Meds not helping after 5 days.

Call doc again. If you have sinusitis which has not responded to flunisolide after 5 days, you likely need an antibiotic now. I don't see how the finding from allergy test would alter your current treatment (for long term , likely yes). In the meanwhile try saline irrigation on the sinuses. Read more...

Whats the best antihistamine for my 12y/o chronic sinusitis allegra Claritin zyrtec or Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and what dose?

Varies. All of the antihistamines mentioned have their own advantages. Claritin and Allegra are the least sedating. They also are dosed once a day. Zyrtec is dosed once a day and is approved for both indoor and outdoor allergens. Benadryl (diphenhydramine) blocks both types of histamine receptors but needs to be given every 4-6 hours due to it's short half life. Dosing varies based on weight. Discuss with your pediatrician. Read more...
Anthistamines. I like Allegra 180mg as it is non sedating, once a day and effective. But it is mostly for sneezing and itching rather than congestion and sinusitis, so if your child has the latter i prefer a setroid nasal spray or a combination antihistamine/steroid nasal spray to control the nasal symptoms. Read more...
Discuss with doctor. Often one medication maybe not enough. Try adding zyrtec (cetrizine) 10 mg or Claritin (loratidine) 10mg, 12 hours after allegra. Add decongestant as well. Sudafed 30-60mg. Avoid Benadryl (diphenhydramine) as it causes sleepiness. Read more...
Antihistamines. All the otc antihistamines are effective but Claritin Allegra and zyrtec have fewer side effects than benadryl (diphenhydramine). Chronic sinusitis may benefit more from prescription nasal sprays. See an allergist for evaluation and treatment. Read more...