Related Questions

How does the doc drain fluid off your knee?

Needle and syringe. A needle can be inserted under sterile conditions into the knee and excess fluid can then be aspirated with a syringe. The area of insertion is usually numbed up with a local anesthetic agent. The knee can hold a fair amount of fluid in the form of normal joint fluid or blood, depending on the cause of the excess fluid. Read more...

I got a cortisone injection for effusion/fluid in left knee today. Doc did not drain it, he said cortisone will remove fluid. Is this true?

Almost. Steroids decrease inflammation, inflammation increases fluid accumulation, by decreasing fluid accumulation due to inflammation steroid gives a chance for your body to reabsorb fluid. That's what he probably had in mind. Read more...
Minor effusion . Minor effusion will not need aspiration. It will resolve with steroid injection. That must have been his rationale . Read more...

My question is about a small joint diffusion in both knees. I have severe pain in both knees. Do Doctors normally drain knees for a small diffusion?

Sometimes. Usually do not unless infection is suspected. A small knee effusion is prob secondary to some trauma, arthritis. If the joints are not warm, or red, then infection is prob not the problem. The severe pain does need evaluation though, call your DR and get an apt in the next few days. Read more...
Generally no. The small amount of excess fluid in your knees may be a result of arthritis or inflammation, The fluid itself doesn't cause pain. Only if the doctor needs a sample of joint fluid for diagnostic purpose would s'he try to remove the fluid. Read more...
Depends on a cause. you may need a tap for diagnostic purposes, but history and physical are important. Do you have reactive arthritis, rheumatoid, how frequently symptoms occur, have you had steroid injection, or this simply wear and tear? This is not simple tap or not to tap question - talk to your doctor. Read more...
Effusion? Normally they do not drain it unless they are doing it for a diagnosis. Normally they treat the cause of the pain and effusion and then the effusion will resolve. If you do not treat the underlying cause the effusion will come back. Doctors do not stick needles in a joint unless there is a reason to do it. See your doctor and have your knees evaluated. Read more...

The doctor drained two syringes full of fluid from my knee but the test was negative for arthritis. What could it be?

It is arthritis . It is arthritis! we have over 150 different types of arthritis. It depends on which one of these it is. It is now your physician's responsibility to find out what type of arthritis it is. Read more...
Inflammation. You are too young to have significant osteoarthritis (wear and tear arthritis) but something caused the joint lining to produce fluid. Possibilities are injury, torn cartilage, viral arthritis, or some type of inflammatory immune arthritis (there are many). Bacterial infections are usually pretty obvious from the fluid and the clinical picture. Find out the fluid test result and ask "what's next.". Read more...