Could jaw muscle pain be a sinus infection?

Grinding. Jaw muscle pain is typically caused by clenching or grinding your teeth. Many of us do this and are not aware of it. The pain would be in the temples, back of your jaw, and in front of your ear. The sinuses are located in the forehead, behind your cheekbones, between and around your eyes and sinus infection pain would be in these areas.
Not likely. Not likely at all. Also depends on which jaw muscle. If you have a sinus infection and jaw pain, after the sinus infection is resolved, if your jaw pain persists, see an oral surgeon for exam.
Diagnosis? Sinus infections do not typically present as jaw muscle pain. It is sometimes difficult for a patient to differentiate between muscle, jawbone, tmjoint, soft tissue or tooth pain. Check with a dentist and perhaps a physician depending upon your best guess scenario based upon your dental and medical history and any other possible symptoms.

Related Questions

I have a sinus infection (viral, I think) and I am on antibotics. I have shooting teeth and jaw pain at random times. What can I do to relieve this pain?

Viral infection . You say you have a viral infection. If this is a definite diagnosis, antibiotics will not help cure the infection. Visit your primary care physician or an ENT doctor for the sinus problem and visit your dentist to evaluate your intermittent teeth pain. Read more...
MD first, then DDS. Viral sinus infections will not be helped with antibiotics. But it might help reduce some swelling associated with the infection. I'd recommend considering consulting with your physician about some sinus drying agents like pseudophed which can also help reduce some of the inflammation which can send pain signals to the teeth. If that doesn't work, then time to see the dentist. Read more...

Is it normal to have a lot jaw pain with sinus infection?

No. Pain is not normal. It's a signal that something's wrong. If your upper jaw hurts and you have a sinus infection, get the infection treated. If pain does not go away you may also have an infected tooth problem, in which case see your Dentist. Read more...
No. No. Could be dental related pain or TMJ. Start with DDS for evaluation. Read more...

I have jaw muscle pain on the right side of my face and worsens when laying down. There is no pain when I'm standing?

TGN. If you lay down you put pressure on that side of your face. It is quite possible you are compressing a nerve close to the surface. Another possibility is trigeminal neuralgia. Also known as tic delaroux. Get it checked out with your dentist or md. If it is the later...It could be very painful. Also...Just a note...Could be your sinuses misbehaving. Read more...
Source of pain. Laying down will increase the blood pressure to your head which can increase pain stemming from your jaw bone. This is common with tooth abcesses. Also, head position can effect the sinuses. The muscle pain may come from pulling on the muscles differently, associated with side you lay on, or holding hand under your jaw, etc. Oral occlusal guard may help. Read more...

Is it possible for a deep sinus infection to cause a swollen jaw and the back gums and teeth on one side to hurt really bad?

Hmmm? Pain to teeth and gums? Yes. Jaw swelling? Perhaps, but not usually. Have your pcp or ENT specialist treat your sinus infection and your dentist examine you to rule out dental problems. You many have either one or both a sinus infection and a dental problem at the same time. There’s no way to know over the internet and it’s best not to make assumptions. Better to be safe than sorry. Read more...
Likely the tooth. If i had to bet, the jaw is swollen on one side because of a dental infection, and that has secondarily infected the sinus. It could be that a sinusitis causes dental pain, but swelling of the gums would be very unusual. I'd see a dentist first for a check (asap), and if it still isn't better you may need to see an ent. Read more...
Could Be. Actual swelling (that is look in the mirror and your face is puffy) from a sinusitis is not very common, but can occur in severe cases. Dental pain due to sinusitis is quite common and is usually focused in the upper back teeth. A bad tooth can mimic a sinusitis as well...or even cause sinusitis on rare occasions. Your dentist should be able to determine the source and treat/refer as needed. Read more...