Do you lose weight after getting your wisdom teeth pulled?

Only if. Only if it prevents you from eating, but your reduced food intake would only be for a few days. If you need to lose weight, consider take shape for life, to find a free health coach near you.
Temporary. May have a temporary weight loss due to post-op pain for a few days. Make sure your wisdom teeth are removed by an oral surgeon.

Related Questions

Is it ideal to be sedated when you get your wisdom teeth pulled?

Only if you need it. Safer not to be put to sleep for anything. Risk of death from general anesthesia is real although rare. Local anesthesia and nitrous oxide are usually all that is needed. Read more...
It depends... On how difficult the wisdom teeth surgery will be and whether you prefer to be aware or unaware of it. Since most patients don't really know what to expect, you need to ask this question of your surgeon as well as what different levels of sedation he/she is trained & comfortable to provide. While there are risks to general anesthesia, so are there to extreme anxiety. Make an informed choice. Read more...
For some, yes..... Each case is different. It depends upon the difficulty of the extraction, how cooperative you are as a patient & both you and your surgeon’s preferences. I have been removing impacted teeth for over 40 years & most patients are fine with local anesthesia (with or without "sweet air") alone. A few feel that they need IV sedation with an oral surgeon & for them, it is best. Discuss it with os. Read more...

How do I know when will the bleeding stop after you get your wisdom teeth pulled out?

Oozing is common. After the teeth are removed, it's normal to experience some oozing of the extraction sites. You should not have any major bleeding, as the tooth sockets should be fairly well clotted soon after surgery. It's normal to have some oozing which may persist for hours or a day. If it's more than this, you should see your doctor. Keep smiling ! Read more...
Usually in 24 hour. Most patients will have some oozing of several hours after a widom tooth extraction. Remember a little blood ad alot of saliva looks like a lot of blood. Post-operative bleeding is controlled by biting on gauze for several hours after the extraction. Read more...

Husband is scheduled to get his wisdom teeth pulled this week. With all his health issues that have been going on for the past 2 months is this safe?

Can't say. We don't know what his health issues are or how well controlled the are. He should let his oral surgeon know about this early on. Read more...
Health issues. Not knowing the nature of your husband's health issues, or the extent of the wisdom tooth surgery that's planned, there is no way for us to make a value judgement. Assuming your husband is seeing a specialist Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, he/she is trained and experienced in treating patients with medical compromise. If you have concerns, contact Surgeon in advance of the scheduled appointment. Read more...
Unknown. Without knowing his health issues it is hard to advise. It is imperative that all his health problems be discussed with his oral surgeon. Ultimately it is the surgeon who is treating him that makes that decision. Read more...
Consultation First. A preoperative consultation with the dentist and/or oral and maxillofacial surgeon would be highly recommended if not already performed before the actual surgery is scheduled. A detailed review of your husband's medical history and physical evaluation will allow the dentist or surgeon to assess your husband's status and options and timing for surgery. Read more...

Is it ok to get wisdom teeth pulled under local anesthesia?

Local anesthesia. Local anesthesia (novocaine) is sufficient to prevent pain during any dental procedure including wisdom tooth removal. Read more...
Yes. Wisdom teeth can be removed under local anesthesia alone. However, the removal of wisdom teeth, especially impacted wisdom teeth can be more comfortably be performed under some type of sedation in conjunction with local anesthesia. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. It is rare that a full general anesthetic would be needed for dental extraction. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. Good luck. Read more...
Very common. Extraction is a serious surgical procedure and the appropriate anesthesia depends on the complexity of the surgery and your own comfort zone. With the profound local anesthesia and IV sedation you will have no recall of the events of the surgery or experience any pain. In many cases only local is used. Good luck. Read more...