Acoustic neuroma surgery - are there any common after effects?

Always. The size of the tumor dictates the chances of some problems from surgery. Most people that have surgery, are able to resume all their normal activities after a recovery period. Almost all patients will experience some vertigo following surgery that resolves over about 4-8 weeks. With larger rumors your chance of having temporary or permanent facial weakness increases.

Related Questions

Acoustic neuroma surgery - any lingering auditory effects?

Yes. Depending on size of the tumour, presurgery hearing levels, including several parameters--the decision to do hearing preservation surgery--the skill of the surgeon -success rate between 40-80% has been studied. Read more...
Yes. The hearing loss that you have at the time of surgery, you never get back. In addition, the majority of the time, acoustic neuromas are so large that surgery cannot be performed that can preserve hearing. However, small tumors have the potential to be removed with preservation of current hearing levels. Read more...

Acoustic neuroma surgery - does ENT or a neurosurgeon do the surgery?

Depends. Many acoustic neuromas can be treated by either an ENT or neurosurgeon. Often we work together to provide the best possible use of each of our respective skill sets. It may depend on the size and location of the tumor and whether or not there is hearing preservation. It is best to work with a place that uses a team approach so that you get the best of both specialties. Read more...
Both. The national institute of health has recommended that acoustic neuroma patients be treated by a team of physicians including ENT and neurosurgery, because patient outcomes were better than when just one specialty was involved. Frequently both physicians will be involved with the surgery, depending on the chosen surgical approach. Read more...

I just got a diagnosis of acoustic neuroma. Is surgery a better option verses radiation when the tumour is 4 mm?

Consider observation. These tumors are typically.Slow growers. Neither treatment is benign. It may be valuable to follow it with MRI and treat if symptoms worsen. Read more...
Depends. At that size another option is to simply observe the tumor. When considering any intervention it's important to understand the overall experience of the center you are being treated at. A 4mm lesion is quite small and could be observed in some cases. Read more...

Are there any treatments for an acoustic neuroma besides brain surgery?

Acoustic neuroma. Yes. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a treatment to stop the growth of acoustic neuromas. Radiosurgery is a focused beam of radiation using computer navigation to target the tumor and stop the growth. Based on the size and symptoms, small tumors with preserved hearing may be observed instead of treatment. Discuss with a team of surgeons who specialize in the treatment of acoustic neuromas. Read more...

I'm worried about unilateral tinnitus. I know acoustic neuroma often causes this, but how common is acoustic neuroma among people w/unilat tinnitus?

Acoustic neuroma. Many less serious and benign conditions can cause unilateral tinnitus and hope yours is one of them. Unilateral tinnitus can be the presenting symptom of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). Recommend physical exam by a neurologist or ENT specialist, audiometric testing, and mri. Read more...
So common. Tinnitus is so common! can be unilateral, too. The vast majority of those with tinnitus do not have an acoustic neuroma. An MRI (high resolution cuts with contrast) can usually eliminate the possibility. Read more...

If an acoustic neuroma comes back, does that mean it’s a cancer?

Usually not. Recurrence usually means some tumor was left behind and not removed from the first surgery. This can occur if a lot was left behind (macroscopic residual, recurrence more frequent), or even a tiny amount was left behind (microscopic residual, recurrence less frequent). Malignant acoustics are extremely rare and most often occur after prior radiation treatment for a benign acoustic neuroma. Read more...
Not usually. Acoustic neuroma may come back if incompletely removed or may grow following radiation, possibly requiring surgery to remove residual tumor. Read more...

What cause balance problem except acoustic neuroma?

Many. Balance problem is a symptom and not a diagnosis and has many causes the main symptom with acoustic neuroma is deafness and tinnitus. Read more...
Dizziness. There is a long list of ear related issues that cause balance problems, neurologic, cardiovascular, circulatory, metabolic/hormonal problems also can cause dizziness/lightheadedness/balance issues. Acoustic neuroma is a rare condition so lots of other things to check and consider first. Read more...