Does everyone with pulmonary hypertension need a catheterization to measure pressures?

Heart cath. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension cannot be diagnosed without a right sided heart catheterization. It's not all about pressure but is about flow produced by the heart, vascular resistance, as well as pressures in the heart chambers and vena cava.
Yes and maybe. A catheterization will best determine what the exact pressure is (you can diagnosed pulmonary hypertension clinically though, i.e.: physical exam, ecg, cxr and echocardiography). Yet the most important info you get from a cath is whether the pressure responds to various medications available that can then be used a treatment for the elevated pulmonary pressures.

Related Questions

Pulmonary hypertension in echo, so heart catheterization next. With EDS (weaker collagen)&many vascular symptoms, is the test OK for me? Other option?

It is the best tests. EDS can cause pulmonary hypertension, a condition that usually is difficult to diagnose with the physical exam only. Most cardiologist would start with non-invasive testing like an echocardiogram but to confirm such diagnosis right heart catheterization is still the best ( invasive) diagnostic procedure. Follow up with your cardiologist because there is treatment for pulmonary HTN. Read more...

Had echo 30d ago => diagnosed pulmonary hypertension (pressure 50), yesterday again the diagnose was questioned (pressure 33). Why ups and downs?

Pulm HTN varies. The pulm artery pressure fluctuates in part in relation to blood pressure fluxes as well as fluid status and medications among other things. It is good news that the number came down as this suggests that it is less likely due to a disease in the pulmonary arteries or lungs themselves. . Read more...
PA pressure. Measurement of PA pressure besides body position has technical factors which can influence what the reader interprets as the PA pressure. Some of these factors can produce a false impression of elevated or lesser PA pressure. In general we try to take the whole clinical picture into consideration when interpreting the study. Read more...

My RV pressure is 25-30 mHg does this suggest possible pulmonary hypertension?

Couple of questions. How was this number obtained? Catheterization? Echo? Normal right ventricular systolic pressure is typically about 20 - 30% of your systemic systolic blood pressure (SBP) (higher number of your regular blood pressure). Readings must be taken nearly simultaneously to be useful. If your SBP is more than 90, I would not be super concerned. Also depends on your risk; diseases leading to pulm HTN? Read more...

What is the difference between severe pulmonary hypertension and raised jugular venous pressure? Do they always coincide?

2 Different Issues. Pulmonary hypertension refers to increased blood pressures in the arteries from the right heart to the lung arterioles (arteriole size/degree-of-constriction vs. Blood flow volume determines the mean pressure). The jugular veins carry blood from the head to the superior vena cava ; right heart. Depending on several variables, either one could be elevated, normal or low while the other is not. Read more...
Difficult to discern. The real test called jvp was designed to determine presence of heart failure or fluid overload. The presence of high pressure against which the right ventricle has to work in pah causes the exaggerated bulging back of the tricuspid in rv systole and also causes jvp. Tricuspid stenosis thus would do the same thing. Read more...

Can echos show pulmonary hypertension if you don't have it just because your body is full with fluid? I have polydipsia & changing pulmonary pressures

Interesting question. Elevation of pulmonary pressures can result from volume overload, particularly when there is left heart failure. A normal right heart, however, can compensate for increased volume for a period, preventing increases in pressure. When persistent stresses lead to structural changes in the cells of the right heart, it cannot compensate further and increased pressure results and by echo indices of PHT. Read more...

Would you consider a pressure of pulmonary hypertension of 40-50 in echo something requiring treatment? If so, what?

RVSP Moderate PHTN. Symptoms are important in this case. Things that could elevate the pressure in your right ventricle could be. - Mitral Regurgitation (eleveating your PCWP or Capillary wedge pressure) - Diastolic/Systolic Dysfunction - Pulmonary Valve Stenosis - Pulmonary emboli If you are having symptoms. Echocardiogram would be useful and depending of situation possible. Read more...

Can you have normal blood pressure with pulmonary hypertension?

Yes. Many times, you can have normal blood pressure with pulmonary hypertension. But, in the latest stages of pulmonary hypertension, the blood pressure can be low because there is no flow to the right heart which then translates into a low blood pressure. Read more...

My lung pressure is 55 now, is that still pulmonary hypertension?

Indication . Elevated pulmonary artery pressure (like 50 mm hg) is highly suggestive of pulmonary hypertension but not diagnostic. For diagnosis, you need a heart catheterization. Read more...
Yes. Not sure but i would assume it was by measured by echo and it would be the right ventricular systolic pressure which would be high at 55 mmhg, i.e. Pulmonary hypertension. Read more...