3 doctors weighed in:

What happens to the pulse pressure when someone has atherosclerosis?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Martin Bress
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: See below

The pulse pressure is the systolic pressure minus the diastolic pressure.
It often rises with aging. The problem is usually high systolic pressure which reflects decreased compliance and stiffening of the blood vessels (hardening of the arteries). This represents a risk for stroke, heart attack and congestive heart failure. The risk can be decreased by lowering the blood pressure carefully.

In brief: See below

The pulse pressure is the systolic pressure minus the diastolic pressure.
It often rises with aging. The problem is usually high systolic pressure which reflects decreased compliance and stiffening of the blood vessels (hardening of the arteries). This represents a risk for stroke, heart attack and congestive heart failure. The risk can be decreased by lowering the blood pressure carefully.
Dr. Martin Bress
Dr. Martin Bress
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Dr. Michael Zevitz
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: Variable

The pulse pressure is the difference between the systolic and diastolic pressures.
It can increase as a result of severe arterial atherosclerosis, but can also increase due to disease of the valves, particularly leaking of the aortic or mitral valves, which can cause heart enlargement. However, a normal pulse pressure does not rule out severe atherosclerosis.

In brief: Variable

The pulse pressure is the difference between the systolic and diastolic pressures.
It can increase as a result of severe arterial atherosclerosis, but can also increase due to disease of the valves, particularly leaking of the aortic or mitral valves, which can cause heart enlargement. However, a normal pulse pressure does not rule out severe atherosclerosis.
Dr. Michael Zevitz
Dr. Michael Zevitz
Thank
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