Slightly swollen tongue cause for alarm?

Number of Causes. of a tongue swelling include infections, allergies, injuries and systemic disorders, just to name a few. The majority of tongue problems are not serious and can be resolved on it's own. However, if you have a swollen tongue that doesn't go away within two weeks, you should consult a doctor or a dentist for evaluation.
Absolutely. A swollen tongue is not normal... You need to determine the cause, and then treat it. A tongue that continues to swell can cause respiratory distress.

Related Questions

What are the more common causes of a swollen tongue?

Swollen tongue. By far the most common cause is an acute allergic reaction (called "angioedema"). This is usually painless but may interfere with breathing. Other causes include infection (glossitis), benign tumors (neurofibromas), vitamin deficiency, underactive thyroid, infiltrative diseases (eg. Amyloidosis), and certain very rare congenital causes (beckwith-weideman syndrome). Read more...

Can you tell me is my swollen tongue caused by medication?

Sorry, we can't. It might be. It could also be a food allergy, a growth, or an infection. This needs to be physically evaluated. Please call an oral surgeon for an appointment. Read more...

Friend said she woke up last night having trouble with swollen tongue. What could have caused that? Second time in a month.

Food allergy. Occasional episodes like this make me think of occasional exposure to a food your friend is allergic to or some ingredient in the food. Simplest first step is to do a food diary and record everything that she eats over the next month. Then you can go back after a reaction and see if you can find similarities. Another method is with igg food allergen testing through a specialty lab like metametrix. Read more...
Allergic reaction? This could be caused by some type of allergic reaction or even something systemic. Is there a history of this occurring? Is there any problem breathing? If so, she should seek immediate attention. She could be having a reaction from something she ate or drank prior to bed. Does she have any vitamin deficiencies? Regardless, this should be checked out and investigated. Start with her dentist. Read more...

Red and swollen tongue, with lots of pain. No meds, no different foods, no changes that couldve brought this. Could it be caused by thrush?

Small chance. Usually with thrush though the distinguishing factor is a white wipe-able coating from the tongue or other areas of the mouth. And usually it doesn't affect a healthy individual unless oral hygiene is really poor and/or the person is under a lot of stress. There are lots of reasons for a swollen red tongue. Get it examined as soon as possible. Read more...
See PCP. Possible. Best way to determine is to see physician to examine you and do testing. Read more...

I have a high IgE reading up to 2000. What could be the causes of this. Also get swollen tongue quite often, with ridges on side from teeth.

Allergic bruxism? The scalloped ridges on the side of your tongue likely are from nighttime clenching or tooth grinding. In 1980 marks published an article in the ajo about the link between bruxism and allergies in children. It is available on pubmed. See your allergist and dentist for treatment. Read more...
Allergy. High IgE reading indicates that you are allergic to something. More testing is required to determine the allergen(s). Swollen tongue is worrisome as it indicates that your allergy is affecting your airway. See your Primary Care Physician and ask for referral to a specialist Allergist. Read more...

Swollen tongue with sores, top of mouth is also very cut up and gums feel raw. What could've caused this and what should I do?

? Canker sores. I cannot be sure if this is what you have but i would see a dentist, dermatologist or oral surgeon. Read more...
Dry mouth? Sound like your mouth is very dried. It could be of several reason: 1) diabetes, 2) sjogren syndrom or dry mouth syndrom, 3) stress, 4) using heat during winter, need humidifier... Check with your dentist for definitive diagnosis. Palliative treatment included good oral hygiene to prevent superinfection and plenty of fluid to prevent dehydration. Read more...