Second degree burn. Can I sunbathe?

No. At the earliest, wait until your sunburns have healed, and all inflammation ; redness is gone before going back out in the sun. Try to do better with your sunscreen. There's no such thing as a "healthy tan".

Related Questions

What to do about second-degree burn, can you help me?

Second degree burns. Are defined by the presence of blisters, but can range from very shallow to very deep. In general, the best treatment (in my opinion) is to remove the blisters to prevent the possibility of a closed space infection. Wash with soap and water, pat dry and apply Bacitracin ointment and a dry dressing 2-3 times/day. If increasing pain, drainage or redness or if not healed in two weeks, see a doctor. Read more...

What a second-degree burn?

Partial thickness. These burns are defined as superficial or deep partial thickness burns. This means some of the key parts of the skin to allow for closure of the wound are in place. However surgery may still be needed in some cases or depending on location, complications. Often people can recognize these burns by the appearance of blisters. Read more...

How can I treat a second degree burn?

Seek medical care. Second degree or partial thickness burns will often heal without surgery. The likelihood is affected by your medical condition, age, and factors such as smoking history. These burns can be treated in a number of different ways including topical salves and biologic or other barrier dressings. One of the more common burn creams is silvadene, (silver sulfadiazine) but it is not the only option. Read more...
Skin antimicrobials. Second-degree burns will heal on their own, given good wound care and good nutrition. Burns on the face should be gooped up with antibiotic ointment several times a day; no dressings are necessary. Burn wounds elsewhere can have antibiotic ointment or silver sulfadiazine applied and then dressed with dressing changes daily in conjunction with a bath/shower. Read more...

Does a second degree burn be washed daily?

Burn. Yes a burn like that can be cleansed each day and dressed with antibiotic ointment and a nonstick dressing. Read more...
See a doctor. The treatment of second degree burns typified by blisters is controversial in regards to opening or leaving the blisters alone. Once the blisters are opened the dead skin should be removed. Nearly all agree on topical antibiotics: Bacitracin oint for face and silvadene (silver sulfadiazine) for body if not allergic to prevent conversion to 3rd degree. Nsaids are controversial, hygiene, nutrition, elevation are advised. Read more...

What would a second degree burn look like?

Blister. A blister intact or partially broken with clear fluid. Read more...
Second degree burn. A 1st degree burn looks like a sunburn--red, painful skin. A 2nd degree burn often has a brighter reddish hue to the skin & often has fluid filled blisters. These burns are usually quite painful & weep fluid. A 3rd degree burn will not be painful & will be dry & leathery. It is best to have your doctor evaluate the burn & make sure appropriate care is administered including antibacterial ointment. Read more...

How do I know if I have a second degree burn?

Blisters, pain. Second degree burns are typically very red, blistered, and more painful. First degree burns are usually just red and may be painful as well. Read more...

What should I wash my second degree burn with?

Mild soap. Wound healing after a 2nd degree burn can take 2-3 weeks. The open sores need hydration to heal. Soaps that do not strip you of your oils will help, such as cetaphil wash. Moisturizing is very important to enhance healing. Read more...
Gentle soap. Assuming that you do not have burn cellulitis or an infection, gentle soap, such as cetaphil will suffice. Follow your physician's advice on what to apply afterwards. Silvadene (silver sulfadiazine) cream is most commonly used and should be washed off prior to reapplication. In this circumstance, you could also use saline. Read more...