How do I give vitamin d to my infant?

Many ways . It's in formula and supplementary vitamins. Follow your pediatrician's advice about vitamin supplementation.
Orally. There are many preparations available in liquid form nationwide and in many chain drug stores as well as supermarkets and health food stores.

Related Questions

Do I need to give vitamin d supplements to infants who are fed infant formula?

No. Formula has added vitamin d. The recommended daily amount of vitamin d for infants is 400 iu daily. Infants drinking formula only should be meeting this requirement. If the baby is partially breastfed, a vitamin d supplement should be added to make sure they get 400 iu daily. Read more...
Yes. Generally not. Unlike most breast milk, most if not all formulas are fortified with vitamin d and will provide the infant with an adequate intake. Read more...
No. Most formula is fortified with vitamin d so you wouldn't need extra, but look at the label, and ask your pediatrician. Read more...
No. If your baby is fully formula fed, they should be getting enough vitamin d (400 iu/day) and should not need a supplement. If they are both formula and breast fed, you may need to supplement them with vitamin d if they are not getting 400 iu/day. Read more...

Baby gets 8oz formula and about 22oz of breast milk. Do we still need to give vitamin D drops? Can I take extra Vitamin D to pass thru breast milk?

But D supplement. Breast feeding is aimed of the best things you can do for your baby, but Vitamin D is not readily available in breast milk. Even with partial supplementation with formula, Vitamin D drops for your baby as a precautionary measure would be wise. . Read more...

Why is it necessary to give vitamin D supplements to my breastfed baby? Doesn’t human milk have all the essential nutrients for babies?

Yes. Breastmilk is complete, as long as the mother has adequate nutritional stores. Vitamin d deficiency is very common, due to lack of sun exposure. If mom has adequate vitamin d levels from either sunshine or supplements, breastmilk should be complete. One study suggests that moms need to take at least 2000 iu of vitamin d daily to allow adequate levels in their breastmilk. Read more...
Yes. Human breast milk indeed is nutritionally complete - provided the mother is complete - if the mother has an adequate blood level of vitamin d so will her milk. Simply put - if she is a breastfeeding lifeguard who doesn't use sunscreen - her milk is perfect. If she stays inside - an oral supplement of at least 5000iu will provide adequate levels in her milk. Read more...
Yes. If you have enough Vitamin D, then you may not need to supplement, but most of don't have enough, and a small supplement can be very beneficial to your baby. There is no source of vitamin D except supplements in our foods, like milk, or vitamin supplements, or made in your skin from sun exposure. It isn't clear how much sun exposure is needed to have enough D. Read more...
Yes, except. If a baby is exclusively breast fed for more than a year, should make sure there is enough iron. Exclusive breast feeding past this age is uncommon, as is iron deficiency cause by this, but can happen and should be monitored. Read more...

How can I give vitamin d tablet to my 3 month old. With spoon its a bit difficult as she spits out. Can I give that in her milk? I also take a multivitam

Vitamin D. If you are breast feeding, it is good to continue your pre-natal vitamins and to give your baby supplements of Vitamin A,,C and D that are not supplied by your breast milk. I do not know what is available in Germany, but in the US there is a product called Tri-Vi-Sol that are drops that are available without an Rx and recommended for breast fed babies. See if there is something similar there. Read more...
Why ? There are liquid (dropper) vitamin preparations of vitamins ADE and K or vitamin D alone available for use when needed. Read more...

I'm exclusively breastfeeding my 9months old boy. At night also 2-3 times when he is fussy. Bad for him? (Give vitamin D regularly)

Introduce food. An otherwise healthy 9 month old should be eating soft foods by now. Food should be introduced between 4 and 6 months of age to promote fine motor movements of the tongue and mouth, increase iron stores, and promote a healthy GI system. You may continue to breast feed at the same time, and his primary source of nutrition is still milk. Speak with your pediatrician if there are medical concerns. Read more...
Follow his lead. If he needs the nurturing of BF it is fine to continue. Some babies are more needy than others. If he would take a bottle at night you could eventually give him water then and he might quit waking to eat. If he lingers at feeds he is looking for nurturing.When he begins to cut it short and expresses interest in moving to other activities he is signaling that weaning is possible. Read more...

When it is recommended to give calcium to infant? I have eight months child I give him only vitamin d drops. ..He got one teeth only and didn't crawl?

Calcium in babies. If the baby is breast fed or on a good formulae calcium supplementation in not necessary. Breast fed babies do need vit d. Crawling and number of teeth are not an indication of sufficient calcium. Some babies skip the crawling phase and go right to walking. Teeth appear between 6 months or as late as 12 months. In china many babies are unnecessarily given calcium. Read more...
Calcium supplement. As long as the child has a balanced diet including milk and vitamin supplement, he should be ok for now. Expect him to crawl soon, but you need to keep him on the floor to learn it, if he is all the time held in a swing all the times. Read more...
It's in formula/milk. The most convenient source of calcium is from the milk or formula they drink. Supplements are seldom needed at that age and have no relationship to tooth eruption or when they crawl. Read more...
Supplements. Be extremely careful not to overdo supplements. The crowns and the great majority of the roots of both baby and permanent teeth are formed well before eat teeth erupt. Calcium in milk and/or formula provides all the calcium needed for healthy tooth formation. Take your child to a Pediatric Dental Specialist at 1st birthday to review dent-racial growth & development an fluoride levels. Read more...