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Doctor insights on: Will A Partially Collapsed Lung Re Inflate Itself Over Time

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Will a partially collapsed lung re inflate itself over time?

Will a partially collapsed lung re inflate itself over time?

Maybe it will: A partially collapsed lung is due to an air leak from the inside of the lung through the covering of the lung, out into the space between the lung and the ribs. The site of the leak has some damage, which will heal itself later. If only a very small amount of air leaked into the chest cavity, that air might go away (reabsorbed by the body) without treatment, and the lung will re-inflate. ...Read more

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Lung (Definition)

Deoxygenated blood enters the lungs from the right side of the heart and travels to the lungs. When you inspire, oxygen flows into the lungs, transverses the capilliares and attaches to hemoglobin down a gradient. At the same time, co2 diffuses into the capilaries and is expelled with exhalation. Oxygen rich blood then flows to the left side of the heart and into the ...Read more


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Why does only one lung collapse in spontaneous pneumothorax?

Why does only one lung collapse in spontaneous pneumothorax?

Great Question: And I have a better answer: unlike the american bison, most mammals have two separate pleural or lung cavities. If one lung collapses, the problem does not usually affect the other side. This is why bison were easy to hunt. If you hit one side of the chest, both lungs could collapse. The picture shows human anatomy, wish i could also post a bison picture as they are majestic creatures. ...Read more

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I have a partially collapsed lung. I have had two xrays since, no improvement. What will happen if i don't get the tube to help it re-inflate?

I have a partially collapsed lung. I have had two xrays since, no improvement. What will happen if i don't get the tube to help it re-inflate?

Could get worse: A simple collapsed lung, also known as a pneumothorax, can turn into a life-threatening condition called a tension pneumothorax. This can be a sudden event that rapidly progresses to death. ...Read more

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Could i fly with a partially collapsed lung?

Could be risky: It depends on the type of "collapsed lung" that you have. But, when flying, there are definite pressure changes that can affect a collapsed lung. So, i would make sure it is ok with your doctor. ...Read more

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Why has my partially collapsed lung remained?

Why has my partially collapsed lung remained?

Collapsed lung : Depends on the cause of the collapse. Many time lung gets trapped and collapsed, and requires decortication to allow expansion. ...Read more

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Is there risk of flying with a partially collapsed lung?

Is there risk of flying with a partially collapsed lung?

YES: I agree with dr.Siegel. Air travel, skydiving, high altitude travel, scuba diving with an unresolved pneumothorax is dangerous. There are different specifics to each patient. It is important you discuss your pneumothorax with your thoracic surgeon and seek guidance and instructions for safe activities. ...Read more

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What happens if you try to fly with a partially collapsed lung?

SOB: Shortness of breath can occur if you do not have proper lung capacity and you fly at high altitudes without proper pressurization. ...Read more

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Could chest pain now be related to a fall 3 months ago that led to a partially collapsed lung?

Yes: Possibilities include incomplete healing, or recurrent partial collapse, or the onset of arthritis due to the injury. It could also be something completely unrelated; heart diseases could be the cause for example. Symptoms like these deserve a full evaluation in person by your health care provider. ...Read more

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My 4 year old has a partially collapsed lung due to infection. I forgot to ask her consultant if she is able to fly. Could anyone advise?

My 4 year old has a partially collapsed lung due to infection.  I forgot to ask her consultant if she is able to fly.  Could anyone advise?

Generally yes: If there is neither fluid nor air, and collapse is purely incomplete inspiration and or atelectasis, generally safe to fly. If we are to understand your question to be "collapse" by fluid and/or atelectasis, generally that is not the same hazard to air travel as a pneumothorax, "collapse" by air. ...Read more

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Dr. Loki Skylizard
300 doctors shared insights

Spontaneous Pneumothorax (Definition)

The collection of air or gas in the space inside the chest around the lungs, which leads ...Read more


Dr. David Dang
237 doctors shared insights

Atelectasis (Definition)

collapse of a lung or part of a lung from ...Read more