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Doctor insights on: Which Radioisotope Is Used In Medicine To Treat

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How can radioisotopes work in medicine?

How can radioisotopes work in medicine?

Several ways: Radioisotopes are used in diagnostic scanning. They are used as the radioactive basis for radiotherapy for tumors and other conditions. They can be injected into the body for therapeutic effect such as radio-iodine for treating thyroid disease or seed implants for prostate cancer. ...Read more

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What are radioisotopes and nuclear medicine?

What are radioisotopes and nuclear medicine?

Functional imaging: Nuclear medicine is use of internal ionizing radiation in form of radioisotopes by intravenous injection, ingestion, catheterization of bladder or inhalation. Functional imaging is performed of skeleton, heart, brain, thyroid, liver, spleen kidneys, bladder, lymph system, gallbladder, etc. Gamma rays instead of xrays. Radiography and MRI are anatomic imaging. ...Read more

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How can the radioisotope iodine be used to identify and treat an overactive thyroid gland?

How can the radioisotope iodine be used to identify and treat an overactive thyroid gland?

Uses thyroidfunction: The thyroid uses iodine to make thyroid hormone. Most of the iodine you get in food gets concentrated in the thyroid. It can't tell the difference between regular iodine and radioactive iodine. In diagnosis, the patient swallows a capsule of a weak radioisotope and then the amount the thyroid absorbs is measured. For treatment, a stronger isotope is used, and over time it destroys thyroid cells. ...Read more

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Is drug induced eps treatable?

Is drug induced eps treatable?

EPS: Extra pyramidal symptoms are very treatable, mainly by adjusting the dose of the psychotropic medication, switching to another psychotropic with less eps side-effect, or adding medications to counter the side-effects such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine) or cogentin. ...Read more

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How treatable is ovarian cancer with today's medicine?

How treatable is ovarian cancer with today's medicine?

Fairly well: We have modestly good treatment for ovarian cancer. If caught early it is curable in half to two thirds of cases. But commonly it presents as stage 3-4 disease where the cure rate drops to 25-30%. Yet the available chemotherapy can buy several years of good life when patient is treated by a specialist(gynecologic oncologist). Good luck. ...Read more

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Do you think drug addiction is a mental illness treatable with ssri's?

Do you think drug addiction is a mental illness treatable with ssri's?

Yes and no: It is absolutely a disease with well documented brain abnormalities. Not only have ssris not helped (unless co-occurring anxiety or depression ) but some studies show increased usage when patients are given these agents. ...Read more

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How might the radioisotope iodine 131 be used?

Iodine 131 uses: Major uses include the treatment of thyrotoxicosis (hyperthyroidism due to graves disease), sometimes hyperactive thyroid nodules (abnormally active thyroid tissue that is not malignant), & some types of thyroid cancer that absorb iodine. ...Read more

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How do radioisotopes help people?

How do radioisotopes help people?

Diagnosis and treat: Radioisotopes are radioactive atoms affixed to various chemicals and biological compounds which can then localize sites of disease in the body. They can also be used to treat a few condtions, the most prominent being hyperactive thyroid. ...Read more

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What are radioisotopes, pet and spect?

What are radioisotopes, pet and spect?

Visibility: Radioisotopes make molecules that are not typically visible on x-rays to show up. In the example of pet, a common molecule used is a radioisotope of glucose (sugar). Tissues that are growing rapidly would accumulate the sugar more readily, and the positrons emitted from them would show up on an x-ray. Spect is similar, but takes more images from different angles to make 3d images. ...Read more

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How is radioisotope thyroid therapy?

How is radioisotope thyroid therapy?

Great treatment: Hi. I assume you're talking about radioactive iodine (specifically 131-I) for hyperthyroidism and not thyroid cancer. 131-Iodine is my preferred treatment for Graves' disease. It's painless, easy, and resolves the issue relatively quickly. It makes you hypothyroid, which is very easy to treat and doesn't require a specialist (although many of my patients keep coming to me for long term follow up). ...Read more

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Diagnosis of what conditions use radioisotopes?

Diagnosis of what conditions use radioisotopes?

Radioisotopes: Many uses in scans to diagnose different disease such as thyroid cardiac bone. ...Read more

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What are uses of radioisotopes in pacemakers?

What are uses of radioisotopes in pacemakers?

For energy.: Many years ago, there were some pacemakers that had "nuclear batteries" - they were powered from the plutonium-238 radioisotope. These batteries lasted many times longer than even the modern batteries do. However, lithium-powered batteries are now the norm - I am not aware of any manufacturers selling a nuclear battery pacemaker in many years. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmc072143. ...Read more

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How could radioisotopes help a doctor to diagnose brain tumour?

How could radioisotopes help a doctor to diagnose brain tumour?

Nuclear medicine/PET: Radiotracer examples include 18F-FDG and 18F-DOPA. Because of their increased metabolic demand, brain tumors will "light up" with the radiotracer on PET scans in comparison to non-cancerous areas of the brain. The role of nuclear medicine in diagnosing brain tumors is still in the early stages. MRI is still most often used. Reference: http://jnm.snmjournals.org/content/48/9/1468.full.pdf ...Read more

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Which radioisotope is now used in cancer radiation treatment?

There are many: Isotopes in use for cancer and benign disease treatment - the list goes from the original radium being re-tooled for prostate treatment to iodine isotopes, 131 for thyroid conditions and 125 as a sealed source for prostate brachytherapy. Narrow your question and i can be very specific. ...Read more

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Is a radioisotope bone scan more detailed then an iodine bone scan?

Is a radioisotope bone scan more detailed then an iodine bone scan?

No iodine bone scan: Nuclear medicine bone scans are performed using a radionuclide called tc 99m mdp. It is a radioactive particle tagged to a molecule involved in bone metabolism. Common exam, around for decades. There is now a new scan using a pet/ct scanner and an isotope sodium flouride. It is sensitive and more accruate but also more expensive and less available. ...Read more

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Can you tell me what to expect with someone who has undergone radioisotope thyroid therapy?

Hyperthyroid: Hi. Since you don't mention thyroid cancer, I'm going to assume the radioiodine therapy is to treat hyperthyroidism. If it's Graves' disease (the most common hyperthyroidism), the radioiodine is expected to make you hypothyroid; you then go on levothyroxine for life (easy & cheap - good therapy). If it's a toxic adenoma or toxic multinodular goiter, you may end back up with normal thyroid function ...Read more

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What are common side effects from the radioisotope in a myocardial perfusion scan?

What are common side effects from the radioisotope in a myocardial perfusion scan?

None: There are no common side-effects from the radioisotope. There have been very rare reports of allergy. There is a theoretical, but unproven risk of the radiation inducing a cancer 10 to 20 years later. There also is a theoretical, but unproven risk of radiation myocarditis. The radiation exposure of 1 rem (about 10 msv ) has not been shown to be harmful. See http://sgoti.Ws/qmhwh7. ...Read more

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TSI bloodwork test or Thyroid Uptake test with the radioisotopes? Benefits/risks, pros/cons? Are they interchangeable as diagnostic tool for graves?

TSI bloodwork test or Thyroid Uptake test with the radioisotopes? Benefits/risks, pros/cons? Are they interchangeable as diagnostic tool for graves?

Thyroid: The first thing you must do is have your doctor order the thyroid labs once he/she has taken a full history and physical exam. The first thing would be to order the thyroid labs and if they are abnormal the radiology program will look for problems in your thyroid. Do not get too concerned for now - all may be OK. If not appropriate care will be given after discussion with you. Keep me posted! ...Read more