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Doctor insights on: When Does Atherosclerosis Develop

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When does atherosclerosis develop?

When does atherosclerosis develop?

Can start as child: It is a progressive hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries - this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer.This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body.The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
381 doctors shared insights

Atherosclerosis (Definition)

Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) is a condition in which a person has build-up of fat, cholesterol, and other substances in the walls of his arteries. Over the years, these substances build-up to form hardened spots called plaques, which can break off pieces of itself and clog arteries downstream ...Read more


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What is atherosclerosis?

Plaque: buildup of plaque and cholesterol deposits, etc. in the arteries--- "hardening of the arteries". Risk factors--- smoking, family history, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, age ...Read more

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What's atherosclerosis from?

What's atherosclerosis from?

Multifactorial: Usually a combination of having a family history, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, high cholesterol, smoking. These are the main players. ...Read more

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What causes atherosclerosis?

What causes atherosclerosis?

Multiple Factors: Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries”, occurs when areas of the artery wall thicken in response to either increased modifiable (high LDL particle levels, smoking or high blood pressure )and non-modifiable (genetics, age, gender) risk factors. Over time, areas of focal thickening may grow into a larger lesion called a “plaque" that can limit blood flow through the vessel. ...Read more

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Can atherosclerosis be cured?

No: Medications and life style changes can prevent it from progressing and at times cause some regression, but will not cure it. ...Read more

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Is atherosclerosis hereditary?

Is atherosclerosis hereditary?

It can be: Yes, atherosclerosis, cholesterol and many other factors can be hereditary - there is a genetic factor - but that is not the end of the story. Smoking, diabetes, overweight/obesity, diet, exercise, cholesterol control (i.e. The preceeding and medications) can influence the progress of atherosclerosis. 1st: know you numbers, 2nd: control the aforementioned factors and take your rx(s). ...Read more

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What does atherosclerosis mean?

Plaque build up: It is hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries - this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer. This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body. The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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How does atherosclerosis start?

How does atherosclerosis start?

Multiple causes: Atherosclerosis is a complex process with diffrent risk factors. Age, htn, high cholesterol, diabetes, family history, tobacco use. The liningof blood vessel has a barrier that protects it. If something causes damage to this, than cholesterol can enter the wall of the vessel and accumulate. Such things as high blood pressue and diabetes are examples of dz that can damage the lining and promote ashd. ...Read more

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Can you reverse atherosclerosis?

Maybe: Medication and life style changes can prevent progression and in some cases cause some reversal of the disease. ...Read more

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What happens in atherosclerosis?

What happens in atherosclerosis?

Progression, Closure: White blood cells, mostly macrophages, invade the walls of the arteries to remove low density lipoprotein (fat carrying protein) particles. Macrophages die if overwhelmed with LDL & cannot export their ingested fat into high density lipoprotein particles. The artery wall thickens & enlarges; no symptoms decades. Plaque rupture induces sudden clots, debris downstream, sudden narrowing & closure. ...Read more

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Dr. Steven Busuttil
239 doctors shared insights

Blocked Arteries (Definition)

Blocked arteries is a condition in which a person has decreased or no blood flow in one or more of his arteries, due to obstructions inside the artery such as thick plaques, floating clumps of broken plaques, blood clots, etc... Severe compression due to a problem on the outside of an artery can also ...Read more