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Doctor insights on: When Does Atherosclerosis Develop

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When does atherosclerosis develop?

When does atherosclerosis develop?

Can start as child: It is a progressive hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries - this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer.This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body.The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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Dr. Milton Alvis Jr
398 doctors shared insights

Atherosclerosis (Definition)

Atherosclerosis is a common disease affecting the walls of arteries. Commonly described as "clogged" blood vessels, it can cause heart attack or stroke even without severe blockages: e.g., if blood clots form on plaques. High levels of LDL cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, & aging can all contribute to atherosclerosis, but prevention is possible ...Read more


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When does arteriosclerosis start?

When does arteriosclerosis start?

Early: The process of atherosclerosis can actually begin in our late teens and early twenties; although the consequences may not manifest for many years. Autopsy examination from young people dying in wars and trauma has revealed early signs of atherosclerosis in these individuals. ...Read more

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When does celiac disease generally develop?

When does celiac disease generally develop?

Any age: Alrhough celiac disease can reveal itself when very young with a 'classic group' of symptoms, there are many older adults with celiac disase thar is diagnosed only after a thorough 'workup' of iron deficiency anemia - that may simply have presented as gradual fatigue - erroneously attributed to 'old age' by the patient - and sometimes others too :(. ...Read more

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Why does vascular disease develop in diabetics?

Why does vascular disease develop in diabetics?

Inflammation: Diabetes can lead to protein changes and inflammation, leading to atherosclerosis, or narrowing and stiffening of blood vessels. Depending on the location, these narrowed arteries may cause heart attack (heart or coronary arteries), stroke (carotid), amputations due to infection/poor healing (legs & feet), blindness (eyes), and kidney failure (kidneys). ...Read more

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When does neurofibromatosis symptoms start to develop?

When does neurofibromatosis symptoms start to develop?

Sometimes at birth: Several signs of nf, the main one six or more flat brown spots over 5 mm in greatest diameter in children and over 15 mm in greatest diameter in post-pubertal individuals, two or more soft nodules or neurofibromas or 1 plexiform neurofibroma, freckling in the axillary or groin regions, tumors of optic nerve, gliomas, bony abnormality such as scoliosis, bone overgrowth or congenital fracture. ...Read more

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What does atherosclerosis feel like before it leads to a heart attack?

What does atherosclerosis feel like before it leads to a heart attack?

No symptoms...: Usually there are no symptoms of atherosclerosis until it is severe enough to block an artery thereby blocking blood flow to a key organ like the heart or brain. Once this happens, a heart attack or stroke can result. So, prevention is the key! Keep your cholesterol level under control with diet, exercise and medication if needed. See your doctor to get your lipid levels checked! ...Read more

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How does coronary artery disease develop in the body?

How does coronary artery disease develop in the body?

Slowly: Low density lipoprotein (ldl) is taken up by endothelial cells in blood vessels. The LDL is broken down (oxidized) and absorbed by macrophages within the wall of the blood vessel. Ultimately, the macrophage which is full of oxidized LDL will die. The dead cells and cholesterol accumulate in the wall of the artery interfering with the flow of blood. ...Read more

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How does coronary heart disease develop in a person?

How does coronary heart disease develop in a person?

Many things: Many things contribute; some modifiable, others not. Things you can't change include family history, gender, genetics (although you can test for the latter). Things you can change or at least affect: smoking (stop!), exercise, diet, cholesterol & other biomarkers, diabetes/prediabetes/insulin resistance, blood pressure, inflammation. These things damage vessel walls & lead to plaque formation/chd. ...Read more

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Artherosclerosis is when plaque builds up occluding lumen of arteries, right. How does this affect blood pressure?

Artherosclerosis is when plaque builds up occluding lumen of arteries, right. How does this affect blood pressure?

Atherosclerosis: A thickened atherosclerotic blood vessel becomes less compliant and can therefore result in a higher BP (same volume of blood traveling in smaller and stiffer pipes). Elevated BP is a potent risk factor for accelerating atherosclerosis. ...Read more

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How does atherosclerosis progress?

Slowly: Atheroscleroisis is a slow degenerative and proliferative process until a plaque ruptures and ulcerates, suddenly sub-totally blocking an artery. The process is completed by a clot forming at the site of ulceration. Until that day, it's a silent, gradual buildup of cholesterol, calcium, smooth muscle cells, macrophages and debris. ...Read more

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Why does diabetes1 people sometimes develop boil in their body?

Why does diabetes1 people sometimes develop boil in their body?

Infection: People with diabetes often have an impaired ability to fight infection, because their immune system does not work as well as a person without diabetes. This is particularly true when the diabetes is not well controlled. ...Read more

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Does insulin resistance mean i will inevitably develop diabetes in 5-15 years?

Depends, Yes..Unless: Type dm develops over several decades, so concern is highly appropriate; keep hba1c ~5.0%, the NMR particle test can predict dm ~20 yrs in advance & keeping these fat carrying proteins in excellent ranges is critically important. Biggest driver of dm is eating sugar(s), i.e. Carbs, so go very low carb. Study: taubes, attia, dietdoctor, lchf, paleo, science for smart people. ...Read more

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When does hydrocephalus appear ?

When does hydrocephalus appear ?

It varies: Hydrocephalus commonly called water on the brain can be present at birth or can develop later in life. It is due to an imbalance between production and absorbtion of brain fluid or csf. There are numerous causes of the congenital form. Other causes include infection and tumors. There is even a form seen later in life that mimics dementia and causes balance problems. ...Read more

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Why does diabetes develop?

Why does diabetes develop?

Broad question: Thats a broad question. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is only 30% genetic. Type 2 diabetes is 80% genetic. It starts off with insulin resistance. The body just makes more insulin initially but eventually it cant keep up and the blood sugars start to rise. With a genetic predisposition if one eats processed sugars, becomes overweight and does not exercise type 2 diabetes may set in. ...Read more

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How does atherosclerosis start?

How does atherosclerosis start?

Multiple causes: Atherosclerosis is a complex process with diffrent risk factors. Age, htn, high cholesterol, diabetes, family history, tobacco use. The liningof blood vessel has a barrier that protects it. If something causes damage to this, than cholesterol can enter the wall of the vessel and accumulate. Such things as high blood pressue and diabetes are examples of dz that can damage the lining and promote ashd. ...Read more

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When did atherosclerosis become treatable?

When did atherosclerosis become treatable?

ForDecadesYetIgnored: Atherosclerosis, typically starts ~age 7, is primarily driven by lipoproteins (the proteins which transport fat in the water outside cells), not cholesterol (made by every cell), thus optimize NMR particle test (hdl & LDL concentration, not cholesterol), keep hba1c low, optional =5.0%, sbp =120 mmhg, don’t smoke, exercise, avoid dietary sugars, etc; study: nusi.Org, taubes, attia, lustig fatchance. ...Read more

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Why does hypertension occur?

Why does hypertension occur?

Genes and time: The arteries (vessels that transport blood away from heart) are very elegant pipes lined with muscle and smooth tissue to allow blood to travel quickly where its neeeded and to stretch or pulse based on body needs. As we get older, cholesterol deposits make them stiffer and less flexible increasing the pressure. High dietary sodium, kidney disease, obesity can also increase the volume of blood. ...Read more

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How long does it take for smoking to cause blood clot or heart disease atherscherosis or sometimes it does not always happen. are there tests?

How long does it take for smoking to cause blood clot or heart disease atherscherosis or sometimes it does not always happen.  are there tests?

Smoking: Smoking has effects on the heart and lungs. It is associated with atherosclerosis by direct oxygen effect and by causing blood vessel damage. It takes about 5 years for people to get back to normal risk after quitting smoking. ...Read more

Dr. Steven Busuttil
245 doctors shared insights

Blocked Arteries (Definition)

Blocked arteries is a condition in which a person has decreased or no blood flow in one or more of his arteries, due to obstructions inside the artery such as thick plaques, floating clumps of broken plaques, blood clots, etc... Severe compression due to a problem on the outside of an artery can also ...Read more