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Doctor insights on: When Did We Start Seeing Skin Cancer As A Problem

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What to do if I have problem with my skin, but it isn't cancer, are there different types of skin cancer?

What to do if I have problem with my skin, but it isn't cancer, are there different types of skin cancer?

Yes: The three main types of skin cancer are squamous cell, basal cell, and melanoma. Treatment options overlap but aren't the same for each type and stage of cancer. As you said, there are also a number of skin conditions that aren't cancer. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,351 Doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


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Will indoor tanning cause any health problems other than skin cancer, like ovarian cancer?

Will indoor tanning cause any health problems other than skin cancer, like ovarian cancer?

Aging and death: Indoor tanning is paying someone to cause you skin cancer and make you age faster! Skin cancer is not to be taken lightly--it is the number one cause of death in young people under the age of 30. Also, once the damage is done you can't undo it. Your skin has memory and will remember every sunburn or uv tanning assault. The damage starts young and accumulates over time. ...Read more

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Can hydrogen peroxide present in bleaching products cause any serious problems (skin cancer, etc...)?

Can hydrogen peroxide present in bleaching products cause any serious problems (skin cancer, etc...)?

None at low levels: Hydrogen peroxide is generally sold at a 3% strength in the stores as a solution. At that strength, exposure is unlikely to cause problems. Significantly higher strengths, e.g. 30-50%, used commercially, can cause irritation and caution should be used when handling high concentration due to react by oxidizing other chemicals. ...Read more

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I have recently noticed a mole on my ear, is it a sign of some skin problem or may be skin cancer?

I have recently noticed a mole on my ear, is it a sign of some skin problem or may be skin cancer?

Not necessarily: Bonnie, you may develop moles during your lifetime. The two keys are to apply sunscreen, and keep an eye on it. If it changes size or shape, or the coloration changes, then get it checked out by your doctor. Hope this helps! ...Read more

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I have always thought that any type of skin cancer when caught early on, by seeing an MD, could be cured 95% of the time. Right?

Early = Good: Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. The 3 most common types are basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma. Melanoma is the most dangerous type. Prognosis depends on the depth of the cancer and the involvement of lymph nodes. If detected early (stage IA), the 10-year survival rate is 95%

Everyone should wear sunscreen when outside and avoid tanning beds. ...Read more

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I think I have facial skin cancer and am located in sunny Florida. I have to wait 2 weeks to see a dermatologist. What do I do in the meantime?

I think I have facial skin cancer and am located in sunny Florida. I have to wait 2 weeks to see a dermatologist. What do I do in the meantime?

Depends: Keeping your face protected with an SPF >30 would be a good start. If you are able to upload good high resolution photos and make a virtual appointment, I may be able to start you on something right away based on what I see. Best! ...Read more

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My optometrist said he thinks I have a skin cancer on my eyelid and wants to remove it for me. Is this ok or should I see a dermatologist instead?

My optometrist said he thinks I have a skin cancer on my eyelid and wants to remove it for me. Is this ok or should I see a dermatologist instead?

Not recommended: Optometrists are not usually trained to to biopsies or surgery of eyelids. I suggest you see either a dermatologist or ophthalmologist. Possibly even oculoplastic specialist. ...Read more

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Rapidly growing, even boardered, uniform colored brown spot on neck. Seeing derm in 3 weeks. Gp concerned about skin cancer. Low risk its melanoma? I'm 21

ABCDE of melanoma: Check out http://www. Webmd. Com/melanoma-skin-cancer/abcds-of-melanoma-skin-cancer as quick reference to ABCDEs of skin cancer. You didn't mention size but it's change/growing thus evolving. While melanoma is rare in 21yo, I agree that evaluation is key. May need biopsy for absolute proof. ...Read more

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I have an appointment made by my gp to see a skin cancer specialist, to remove a lump, and see him in a month. Should I be removing it sooner?

I have an appointment made by my gp to see a skin cancer specialist, to remove a lump, and see him in a month. Should I be removing it sooner?

Depends: For an isolated, small, non-aggressive skin cancer, 1 month is usually not an unreasonable amount of time to wait. If this is a dark spot with a melanoma diagnosis, if the lesion appears to be spreading fast, or if it is getting infected (red with or without drainage), you should seek medical attention from a dermatologist or plastic surgeon sooner. ...Read more

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I have a zit sized lump under my skin on my shoulder. Can't see anything you can just feel it. What is it? Skin cancer?

I have a zit sized lump under my skin on my shoulder. Can't see anything you can just feel it. What is it? Skin cancer?

Lesion: It is considered a skin lesion until it is seen and officially diagnosed. Skin cancer would be unlikely on a differential diagnosis list. A cystic lesion would be more likely. Have the Dr. Officially diagnose you with an exam. Best wishes. ...Read more

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For a skin cancer screening by dermatologist do I have to get naked or no? My genitals don't recieve sunlight so I don't see why I would

Skin Cancers: While sun exposure is the most important risk factor for skin cancer, many potentially lethal skin cancers develop in protected sites like the soles of the feet, scalp and genital areas. It's important to be thoroughly examined, but this can be done with respect and dignity. ...Read more

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Why should I see a plastic surgeon or mohs surgeon instead of derm doctor for skin cancer removal and repair?

Location: Skin cancers in difficult places (eyes, nose, ears) should always be removed by mohs surgery. It is the only procedure that will assure you have had your skin cancer removed completely. Mohs surgeons are excellent at repairing defects and if they are not confident in their skill they will let a plastic surgeon repair the defect. ...Read more

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What is skin cancer?

Abnormal cells: Skin cancer has become a concerning condition which affects approximately one in every five people today. There are several types of skin cancer, each of which is the result of abnormal cellular activity. Common forms of skin cancer are basal and squamous cell carcinomas and melanoma. Early treatment is ideal for optimal prognosis. Learn more about skin cancer at http://dermdocs. Com/. ...Read more

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Coler of skin cancer?

Coler of skin cancer?

Varies..: Melanomas are often pigmented (dark) lesions with asymmetric borders and different colors within the cancer. Other skin cancers are more "skin colored" but often have scaling, ulcerations, prominent blood vessels, or a pearly appearance. All skin cancers enlarge with time. If you have doubt about a spot on your skin get it checked out. ...Read more

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Does skin cancer itch?

It can: Certain skin cancers, basal cell can instill an inflammatory respond in the surrounding skin which can "itch." best to see a doctor if you have a questions. ...Read more

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What causes skin cancer?

Sun damage, Genetics: There can be a family component to many cancers including skin cancers. This should not be taken lightly. Sun exposure is another large risk factor for skin cancer. The two together can be very dangerous. If you have a strong family history, lots of sun exposure, or any enlarging skin lesions, be evaluated by your local doctor and/or dermatologist. ...Read more

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Do I have skin cancer?

Needs evaluation: Do you sores that will not heal? Pale skin or red hair? Have you had common exposure to bright sunlight with frequent sunburns? Are there nodules on your skin that are growing irregularly. Check with your dermatologist if any of these are present. ...Read more

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Is skin cancer hereditary?

Can be: There can be a family component to many cancers including skin cancers. This should not be taken lightly. Sun exposure is another large risk factor for skin cancer. The two together can be very dangerous. If you have a strong family history, lots of sun exposure, or any enlarging skin lesions, be evaluated by your local doctor and/or dermatologist. ...Read more

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How does skin cancer grow?

Local growth mostly: Mostly skin cancers (like all cancers) grow locally, spreading both side to side as well as down. For melanomas in particular, deep growth is more dangerous. Cancers also can jump (or metastasize) via lymphatic vessels or blood vessels. This can lead to spread to local lymph nodes or distant sites like the lungs, liver, brain, etc. ...Read more

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How do you get skin cancer?

How do you get skin cancer?

Sun damage: The most important risk factor is sun exposure, and the damage that comes from that. Other things can contribute including your genetics and family history. Wearing appropriate clothing and use of sunblock is the most important thing you can do to help skin cancer. ...Read more

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How does skin cancer begin?

Sun damage: With rare exception, most skin cancers are caused by sun damage. Any new skin bump which is new, enlarging, and changing is concerning. The older you are, and the more sun exposure you have had, the higher the risk of skin cancer. Melanomas risk is remembered as abcd: asymmetry, irregular borders, irregular coloration, diameter >6mm. If in doubt, have it check out by your doctor. ...Read more

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How do you treat skin cancer?

Surgery: Skin cancers is usually treated by surgical excision. This allows you to assess that the margins are clear and will allow you to stage the tumor appropriately. Occasionally, in poor surgical candidates, non-surgical modalities may be employed. ...Read more

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Can this look like skin cancer?

See dermatologist: To evaluate the skin lesions and biopsy it if indicated. ...Read more

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How can skin cancer be treated?

How can skin cancer be treated?

Usually surgery: Most skin cancers are treated initially with surgical excision. In some cases, depending on the type of tumor, other modalities may be employed. These include radiation, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and others. ...Read more

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Can skin cancer be transmitted?

Can skin cancer be transmitted?

Not possible: Skin cancer is not contagious and can not be transmitted from one person to another. ...Read more

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How harmful is the skin cancer?

How harmful is the skin cancer?

Depends > what kind: Depends as to what kind --- 1. Basal cell carcinoma > most of the times less harmful 2. Squamous cell carcinoma > more harmful 3. Malignant melanoma > very very harmful. ...Read more

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What does skin cancer look like?

Varies: There are several different types of skin cancers. Squamous cell the skin begins as a small nodule and as it enlarges the center becomes necrotic and sloughs and the nodule turns into an ulcer. Basal cell patients present with a shiny, pearly nodule. Melanoma patients have an irregularly appearing pigmented lesion. ...Read more

Dr. Mike Bowman
958 Doctors shared insights

Skin Cancer (Definition)

A condition in which some element of your skin--which is one of the most complex organs in the body--degenerates into cancer. The three most common types of skin cancer are: basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma which occur in that order and degree of aggressiveness. Although heredity plays a major role, sun exposure and tobacco use and ...Read more


Dr. Travis Kidner
2,634 Doctors shared insights

Melanoma (Definition)

Cancer of the melanocyte cells. Melanocyte cells determine the color of your skin. Although these cells are primarily found in your skin, they can also be found in the bowel ...Read more