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Doctor insights on: What Part Of The Immune System Is Involved In Organ Rejection

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What part of the immune system is involved in organ rejection?

What part of the immune system is involved in organ rejection?

Innate and Adaptive: Innate or non-specific immunity involves the skin, lining of the GI tract, respiratory tract, gu tract, etc; and adaptive immunity that involves cells (primarily lymphocytes). Both types of immunity can affect the graft and trigger rejection. In addition, immune responses involve the formation of both cells and antibodies (proteins) that are reactive against the transplanted organ. ...Read more

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What organs are not part of the immune system?

What organs are not part of the immune system?

All organs: The immune system functions to a degree in all the organs of your body. So, an infection anywhere will eventually be noticed and attacked. Certain organs, like the brain, eye, and testes are immune "privileged"--the immune cells will ignore those tissues to minimize the chance of disrupting their function. That is, unless something is seriously wrong (like a major infection). ...Read more

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Are the lungs, spleen, lymphatic vessels and bone marrow all part of the immune system?

Are the lungs, spleen, lymphatic vessels and bone marrow all part of the immune system?

Yes and more: The major organs that produce cells key for the immune system are the bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes and thymus. However, there are very active immune cells in most tissues including the skin, GI tract including liver and lungs. ...Read more

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Are heat shock proteins part of the nervous, endocrine, or immune system?

Are heat shock proteins part of the nervous, endocrine, or immune system?

All: Hello Edward, Heat Schock Proteins could be viewed as being a part of all these systems. These proteins are primarily upregulated in response to stress and affect numerous other proteins which could potentially be part of any system in the body. ...Read more

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Why does the immune system attack a person's newly replaced organ?

Foreign antigens: A person's immune system will see a replaced organ as a foreign object unless the tissues are identical (from an identical twin or tissue grown from one's own cells). To prevent rejection of the organ, doctors often have to give medications to suppress this unwanted immune response. The closer the tissues mach, there is a lower probability of the unwanted immune response. ...Read more

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For what reasons might the immune system begin to attack a persons newly replaced organ?

It's complicated: I assume you mean a transplanted organ.The immune system is essentially trained to attack anything that is not "self." this includes viruses, etc., but also organs from other people. Donors and recipients of transplants are "matched" to try and minimize the differences, but unless it's identical twins, the immune system will eventually catch on. Immune suppressants help prevent this reaction. ...Read more

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Is it possible to locally suppress the immune system, like only suppressing it at one gland or organ?

Is it possible to locally suppress the immune system, like only suppressing it at one gland or organ?

Yes: That is why we use inhalers for asthma or nasal sprays for nasal allergies or steroid injections in inflamed joints. All of these create localized immune suppression. ...Read more

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Why does the immune system reject a transplanted organ?

Why does the immune system reject a transplanted organ?

Foreign proteins: Everyone has a unique genetic make up which determines the types of proteins found in our body (only identical twins have the exact same genes). Our immune systems are designed to recognize and destroy all proteins that are "foreign" (i.e. Not our own). A transplanted organ contains someone else's proteins, thus the body sees it as foreign and attacks/rejects it. Medications prevent this. ...Read more

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