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Doctor insights on: What Organs Are Affected By Parkinsons Disease

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Please help! What is the main difference between alzheimers' and parkinsons' disease?

Please help! What is the main difference between alzheimers' and parkinsons' disease?

Movements: Alzheimer's disease affects mainly memory and other cognitive functions. Parkinson's disease affects movements, either by tremor or by rigidity. It does not affect cognitive functions in the early stages. ...Read more

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Why can t healthy dopaminergic neurons be moved into the area of parkinson s affected neurons to treat parkinson s disease?

Why can t healthy dopaminergic neurons be moved into the area of parkinson s affected neurons to treat parkinson s disease?

Not so simple: Most of the dopaminergic neurons end in the substantia nigra of the midbrain, originating in various deep brain structures. These nerves are already affected by the disease. Unaffected nerves of course still remain but remain connected to brainstem. So outside nerve cells (from another source like stem cells are needed) nerves don't like to be moved around anyway, because they often die. ...Read more

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What systems of the body are affected by Parkinson's disease?

What systems of the body are affected by Parkinson's disease?

Disease of misfolded: Proteins, affecting numerous neurotransmitters, especially a Dopamine deficit. Main brain systems include basal ganglia (especially substantial nigra), but also dorsal vagal nucleus, locus ceruleous, and pallidum. But we are now finding areas of pathology in the gut (meissner's plexus), so this may be more systemic than we used to think. ...Read more

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Who is most affected by Parkinson's disease?

Who is most affected by Parkinson's disease?

Older males: Typically, there are about 3 times as many males as females, but not fully clear why there is this predilection. Usually a disease presenting in the 60's and 70's, but younger patients can be seen. There may be a higher frequency in Caucasians. ...Read more

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Can toxic substances cause parkinson’s disease?

Can toxic substances cause parkinson’s disease?

Parkinsonism: Yes. There is evidence that certain chemicals and pesticides can cause parkinsonism. We are now experiencing an epidemic of parkinsonism but it is not clear why this is happening. ...Read more

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Can you tell me in Parkinson's disease, does dopamine loss occur merely in the striatum or does it occur in the s.niagra too?

Can you tell me in Parkinson's disease, does dopamine loss occur merely in the striatum or does it occur in the s.niagra too?

Pigmented nuclei: The dopamine loss involves predominantly the basal ganglia area, but also involves dorsal vagal nucleus, substantial nigra, and areas of any dopamine interaction within brain and brain stem. But, to be complete, Parkinson's is a multi-neurotransmitter degenerative deficiency syndrome with other neurotransmitter systems involved. ...Read more

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Is parkinson’s disease hereditary?

Yes: Although the causes are multifactorial and sometimes poorly understood, there is a hereditary component. Keep in mind, that even though a parent may have it, it does not mean that it will be necessarily passed on. The tendency, however, may be there. ...Read more

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Can dysarthria due to parkinsons' s disease be cured?

Can dysarthria due to parkinsons' s disease be cured?

Control perhaps: Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder, which responds to several medicines, but cannot be cured at this time. The speech problems may respond to medication adjustments, and perhaps benefit if deep brain stimulation is used. Sometimes speech therapy might work. ...Read more

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Any disabling disease worse than parkinsons?

Its relative: The question doesn't really make sense because comparing morbidity of different diseases is impossible. Suffice it to say, infortunately, that there are many bad diseases to suffer from abd that most of them end badly. ...Read more

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Tell me about Parkinson's disease.?

Tell me about Parkinson's disease.?

Neurodegenerative: Parkinson’s results from destruction of dopamine-producing neurons in part of the brain (substantia nigra). A lack of these neurons causes decreased excitation of the motor part of the brain. This results in the classic signs of a resting tremor (“pill-rolling”), slowness of movement (shuffling steps), rigidity (resistance to being moved), and postural instability (balance issues). ...Read more

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How can I treat Parkinson's disease?

You cant: Your doctor has many meds at your disposal. ...Read more

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Can wilsons disease mimic parkinsons?

Can wilsons disease mimic parkinsons?

Yes: Parkinson-like symptoms can be an initial manifestation of Wilson's disease. Wilson's disease usually occurs in younger people, however. If there is any confusion in diagnosis, Wilson's disease can usually be diagnosed through a combination of blood tests, urine tests, and/or an eye exam. Hope this helps. ...Read more

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Severe Parkinson's disease, what to do?

Severe Parkinson's disease, what to do?

See a neurologist: Tough one. Medications like sine met may help. Diet may help. Support group may help. Occasionally deep brain stimulators help. ...Read more

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How to better treat Parkinson's disease?

How to better treat Parkinson's disease?

Modernize Treatment!: Dopamine meds are mainstay of treatment. Modern therapy recommends longer lasting, milder potency meds first: Azilect (mao-b selective inhibitor) & Dopamine agonists (requip xl/mirapex er/neupro). After they've been maximized & stronger meds are needed to adequately manage symptoms, then sinemet +/- Comtan (stalevo (carbidopa and levodopa and entacapone) is both together) are begun. Tailor rx with side effects in mind for each person. ...Read more

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How do you diagnose Parkinson's disease?

How do you diagnose Parkinson's disease?

Good History & Exam!: Physical symptoms can include tremor of limbs at rest>in posture or in action; slow movements & stiff (rigid) muscles causing quiet facial emotions, softer voice, bent forward head & neck posture, decreased arm swing, slow-shuffled walk, small/scratchy penmanship, etc. Non-physical symptoms can include cognitive decline, depression, anxiety, sleepiness, constipation, ed, low bp, acting-out dreams. ...Read more

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Latest medicine to cure Parkinson's disease?

Latest medicine to cure Parkinson's disease?

None: There is no cure for parkinsons disease. There are about two dozen medicines for parkinson's, some 60 years old, others five years old. Each of them does something a little different. There is also surgery for a select group of patients with parkinsons. Talk to your neurologist. ...Read more

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What do you recommend for Parkinson's disease?

What do you recommend for Parkinson's disease?

Parkinson's ds: Neurologists are usually consulted for this condition as it affects a specific portion of the brain. They can prescribe med to slow development of ds and suggest other beneficial treatments. ...Read more

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What are the main symptoms of Parkinson's disease?

Here's a brief list: Physical symptoms can include tremor of limbs at rest>in posture or in action; slow movements & stiff (rigid) muscles causing quiet facial emotions, softer voice, bent forward head & neck posture, decreased arm swing, slow-shuffled walk, small/scratchy penmanship, etc. Non-physical symptoms can include cognitive decline, depression, anxiety, sleepiness, constipation, ed, low bp, acting-out dreams. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of the onset of Parkinson's disease?

What are symptoms of the onset of Parkinson's disease?

Tremor, Poor Control: Tremor or poor control of movement are typical presenting signs. Loss of smell can also be a sign of pd. ...Read more

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What are the beginning stages of Parkinson's disease?

What are the beginning stages of Parkinson's disease?

Tremor: Early, there may be a resting tremor unilaterally, and perhaps some focal stiffness. Later, the gait may become impaired, with short unsteady steps, and a tendency to fall. The face may become expressionless, drooling may present, and thinking becomes disrupted. Problems with swallowing, constipation, and skin eruptions can also occur. ...Read more

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What happens in the final stages of Parkinson's disease?

What happens in the final stages of Parkinson's disease?

Death: While motor dysfunction occurs early, cognition, depression, and dementia occur in later stages. There is gradual loss of motor control, even swallowing. Death occurs from pneumonia, aspiration, or cardiac cause. ...Read more

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Can you tell me what to expect from Parkinson's disease?

Can you tell me what to expect from Parkinson's disease?

Mayo Clinic!: Usually, a treating neurologist can provide very specific information to a patient. If you want to read on your own, the mayo clinic has a very good webpage (http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/diseases-conditions/parkinsons-disease. ...Read more

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What are the lesser-known symptoms of Parkinson's disease?

What are the lesser-known symptoms of Parkinson's disease?

A variety: Difficulty swallowing, constipation, drooling, confusion, hallucinations, fluctuating levels of responsively, poor size and distance judgement, repetitive poking and pushing nearby small objects, orthostatic hypotension, PAIN which can be horrible. ...Read more

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What is the definition or description of: Parkinson's disease?

What is the definition or description of: Parkinson's disease?

Parkinsons disease: Is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. The motor symptoms of parkinson's disease result from the death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain; the cause of this cell death is unknown. Early in the course of the disease, the most obvious symptoms are movement-related; these include shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with. ...Read more

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What structures of the body deteriorate with Parkinson's disease?

What structures of the body deteriorate with Parkinson's disease?

Brief comments: This is complex as it involves brain stem structures such as locus ceruleus and dorsal nucleus of vagus, in addition to basal ganglia such as substantial nigra and putamen. A specific variety of dementia called Lewy Body disease can accompany. The brain is afflicted and the remainder of body affected secondarily. Good treatment is available. ...Read more

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Is there one overwhelming symptom that is the hallmark of Parkinson's disease?

Is there one overwhelming symptom that is the hallmark of Parkinson's disease?

Resting Tremor: Parkinson's disease is charcterized by the constellation of resting tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia (slowed movements). The resting tremor can start on one side of the body, and when present in the hand is described as"pill-rolling". This tremor is different than intention tremors, seen with movement, or essential tremor. The resting tremor can in time generalize, and worsen in intensity. ...Read more

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What do you suggest if my grandpa had Parkinson's disease what are the chances I do to?

What do you suggest if my grandpa had Parkinson's disease what are the chances I do to?

We don't know yet: As with other neurological disorders, we are still learning about the role of genetics in the development of PD. Approximately 15% of PD patients have a family history. Familial cases of PD can be caused by mutations in known genes, but we still don't fully understand how genetic changes cause PD or influence the risk of developing it. Ref: http://www. Pdf. Org/en/genetics__parkinsons_gwinn ...Read more

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Is Parkinson's disease curable?

No: There are treatments to help symptoms, but no cure. ...Read more