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Doctor insights on: What Not To Drink With Kidney Stones

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Dr. Tanya Russo
64 doctors shared insights

Kidney Stones (Definition)

Seriously- renal stones are the result of postive and negatively charged particles in urine binding together and precipitating as solids- most frequently as calcium- oxalate. This happens most often when the urine is concentrated- ie when you are dehydrated. And trying to pass these stones from the kidney to the bladder is incredibly painful. ...Read more


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Do you know are kidney stones from not drinking usually bad ones?

Do you know are kidney stones from not drinking usually bad ones?

What is bad ones?: For most of stone formers, their cause for their stone is idiopathic and related with their inherent low stone inhibitors activity in urine. With no comprehensive stone work-up, no specific recommendation for stone prevention will be given, but keeping daily urine output >2500 cc and decreasing oral consumption of salt, red meat, and dairy products by 50% are a good decent effective advice. ...Read more

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Can you tell me if I have kidney stones, is it bad to drink ginger ale?

Can you tell me if I have kidney stones, is it bad to drink ginger ale?

What are your sympto: We can not tell you if you have kidney stones without knowing your symptoms and what makes you think you may have kidney stones kidney stones present with pain in back in area of kidney radiating down to groin, associated with painful urination and blood in the urine if you have these symptoms go to er, they will examine you and do urine test and cat scan/ultrasound imaging to diagnose if you have s. ...Read more

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Will drinking extra water temporarily reduce the pain form a kidney stone?

Will drinking extra water temporarily reduce the pain form a kidney stone?

It might: The idea behind increasing your fluid intake is that it puts more fluid through the ureter, which is where the stone usually gets stuck. With more fluid, the ureter dilates and the stone may pass through more easily. Most of the time, narcotics are necessary to control the pain and may help relax the ureter to get the stone to pass too. ...Read more

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Is propel okay to drink instead of plain water while passing a kidney stone ?

Is propel okay to drink instead of plain water while passing a kidney stone
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Not likely...: Electrolyte-containing Propel water would not help a stone pass through ureter to bladder although vigorous increase in urine excretion by increasing oral fluid or diuretics or alpha-blocker has been touted, but not firmly proved, to speed up stone passage for decades. In general, a <4-mm stone may pass in 2 wks for 75-85% of times. More? Seek evaluation/ counseling timely. ...Read more

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Do I have to drink a lot of soda and sugary drinks to get kidney stones? Is there any other way?

Do I have to drink a lot of soda and sugary drinks to get kidney stones? Is there any other way?

Yes, many ways.: There are many different types of kidney stones, and therefore many different causes of stones. Many times diet is a factor, but sometimes certain medical conditions or medications can be the cause. Even the way the kidneys process minerals in the urine can lead to stones. If you have a history of kidney stones, a 24 hr urine test and blood tests can help a nephrologist find the cause. Good luck. ...Read more

Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more


Kidney Stone (Definition)

Solutes precipitate and combine to form stones formed of calcium oxalate usually around a nidus of uric acid. Other solutes that form stones are ca and mg phosphates, cystine, and uric acid staghorn calculi form in the presence of chronic urinary tract infections. Stones can be painful, may require ...Read more