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Doctor insights on: What Neurotransmitters Are Affected By Huntingtons Disease Medication

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Which neurotransmitters are possibly affected by huntington's disease?

Which neurotransmitters are possibly affected by huntington's disease?

Acetylcholine/GABA: There are specific decreases in acetylcholine and gaba, which in turn affect the activity of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Interestingly, this is the exact opposite of parkinson disease. ...Read more

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Neurotransmitter (Definition)

A neurotransmitter is a chemical messenger that carries, boosts and modulates signals between neurons and other cells in the body. In most cases, a neurotransmitter is released from the axon terminal after an action potential has reached the synapse. The neurotransmitter then crosses the synaptic gap to reach the receptor site of the ...Read more


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What systems of the body are affected by Parkinson's disease?

What systems of the body are affected by Parkinson's disease?

Disease of misfolded: Proteins, affecting numerous neurotransmitters, especially a Dopamine deficit. Main brain systems include basal ganglia (especially substantial nigra), but also dorsal vagal nucleus, locus ceruleous, and pallidum. But we are now finding areas of pathology in the gut (meissner's plexus), so this may be more systemic than we used to think. ...Read more

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What symptoms are caused by Alzheimer's disease?

What symptoms are caused by Alzheimer's disease?

Problems with memory: thinking, finding words, judgment, getting lost, handling money/paying bills, repeating questions, completing daily tasks, losing/misplacing things, mood, personality changes; Moderate: memory loss, confusion, problems recognizing family/friends, unable to learn new things/situations, carry out multi-step tasks (getting dressed), hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, impulsive behavior. ...Read more

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What are the tests of the disorder "huntingtons disease or hungtingtons chorea" ?

What are the tests of the disorder "huntingtons disease or hungtingtons chorea" ?

Genetic test: Huntington's disease is due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the huntintin gene. The most definitive diagnosis of this disease is a positive test for this mutation. This genetic testing can be done before symptoms develop, but early diagnosis does not affect the outcome of the disease. Genetic counseling is recommended before testing. ...Read more

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What are some medications for Parkinson's disease that mimic or replace the dopamine chemicals?

What are some medications for Parkinson's disease that mimic or replace the dopamine chemicals?

List: The classic is L-DOPA, and dopamine agonists include Requip, Mirapex, Neupro (rotigotine) patch, All of these supplement dopamine directly or indirectly, but other medications are available to prolong the effect, such as entacapone, or Aziiect. ...Read more

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What parts of the brain are most commonly affected by huntington's disease?

What parts of the brain are most commonly affected by huntington's disease?

The basal ganglia: Hundington's disease is a disease which destroys the part of the brain called the basal ganglia which is important for controlling movement. ...Read more

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What parts of the brain are most likely affected by alzheimer's disease?

What parts of the brain are most likely affected by alzheimer's disease?

Medial temporal lobe: Alzheimer's starts in the hippocampus and the medial temporal lobe. In end-stage alzheimer’s there is widespread atrophy. Early onset alzheimer’s (<65 years old) has a different presentation. There is usually some mild hippocampal atrophy, but the most striking finding is parietal atrophy, with atrophy of the posterior cingulum and the precuneus. The hippocampus can be normal. Hope this helps. ...Read more

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Which homeopathic medicines are used to treatment neurological disease and disorder?

Which homeopathic medicines are used to treatment neurological disease and disorder?

Many: There are hundreds of homeopathic medicines which might be used to help people with neurological diseases, even when conventional care falls short. These are chronic conditions -- and finding the most effective medicine for you requires working with a professional homeopath who can thoroughly assess your individual case first. Collaborative care with a conventional neurologist is still wise. ...Read more

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Why can t healthy dopaminergic neurons be moved into the area of parkinson s affected neurons to treat parkinson s disease ?

Why can t healthy dopaminergic neurons be moved into the area of parkinson s affected neurons to treat parkinson s disease ?

Not so simple: Most of the dopaminergic neurons end in the substantia nigra of the midbrain, originating in various deep brain structures. These nerves are already affected by the disease. Unaffected nerves of course still remain but remain connected to brainstem. So outside nerve cells (from another source like stem cells are needed) nerves don't like to be moved around anyway, because they often die. ...Read more

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What organ system(s) are impacted by raynaud's disease?

What organ system(s) are impacted by raynaud's disease?

None to many!: It depends on whether it is raynaud's phenomena, or raynaud's associated with a ctd. With scleroderma, it is the most common first symptom! obviously, raynaud's of the kidneys and heart are serious. See a rheumatologist who will perform nail fold capilaroscopy! ...Read more

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What are examples of diseases similar to Parkinson's and/or huntington's?

What are examples of diseases similar to Parkinson's and/or huntington's?

Opposites: Parkinson's disease is a condition with loss of ability to initiate movements. (other than involuntary tremor in 70 %) One can see excessive involuntary movements with peak dose dyskinesias in treating it. Athetosis and choreaform movements are seen in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sydenham's chorea (from rheumatic fever) One can also see this with tardive dyskinesia and neuroacanthocytosis. ...Read more

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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What are the psychological effects of Parkinson's disease?

Dr. Alan Ali Dr. Ali
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What are the psychological effects of Parkinson's disease?

Parkinson: The blunting of affect, slow mobility, tremors & stiffness can affect moods & present with depression & despair, also effect of some medications used can add to that, along with quality of life issues. ...Read more

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Who is most affected by Parkinson's disease?

Who is most affected by Parkinson's disease?

Older males: Typically, there are about 3 times as many males as females, but not fully clear why there is this predilection. Usually a disease presenting in the 60's and 70's, but younger patients can be seen. There may be a higher frequency in Caucasians. ...Read more

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What major organs can be affected by autoimmune diseases?

What major organs can be affected by autoimmune diseases?

Almost any organ.: Heart, lungs, kidney, thyroid, brain and liver are examples of organs that are targets of autoimmune diseases. Lupus, autoimmune hepatitis, graves disease, and multiple sclerosis are examples of autoimmune diseases. ...Read more

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What body organs are affected by hashimotos disease?

What body organs are affected by hashimotos disease?

All: Once the antibodies decrease the ability to make adequate thyroid hormone all metabolic processes in the body may be affected. ...Read more

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What are the ways Lyme disease can be transmitted?

What are the ways Lyme disease can be transmitted?

Deer ticks only: Deer tick bites only. No person to person transmission except a pregnant woman who is infected can transmit it through the placenta to the fetus. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of huntingston chorea disease?

What are the symptoms of huntingston chorea disease?

See definition.: Huntington disease is a slowly progressive, neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea, incoordination, cognitive decline, personality changes, and psychiatric symptoms, culminating in immobility, mutism, and inanition. [1] it is an autosomal dominant, trinucleotide repeat disorder that affects men and women equally. It characteristically appears in mid-adult life but can occur at any age. ...Read more