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Doctor insights on: What Is The Universal Donor Blood Type

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Is there a universal blood donor type?

Is there a universal blood donor type?

At one time, type O negative blood was considered the universal blood donor type: This implied that anyone — regardless of blood type — could receive type O negative blood without risking a transfusion reaction. But it's now known that even type O negative blood may have antibodies that cause serious reactions during a transfusion. And blood transfusions in general carry some risk of complications. Blood may be classified as one of these four types: Type A, Type B, Type AB, Type O. Blood is also classified by rhesus (Rh) factor, which refers to a specific red blood cell antigen in the blood. If your blood has the antigen, you're Rh positive. If your blood lacks the antigen, you're Rh negative. Ideally, blood transfusions are done with donated blood that's an exact match for type and Rh factor. Even then, small samples of the recipient's and donor's blood are mixed to check compatibility in a process known as crossmatching. In an emergency, type O negative red blood cells may be given to anyone — especially if the situation is life-threatening or the matching blood type is in short supply. ...Read more

Dr. Gerald Mandell
90 doctors shared insights

Blood Type (Definition)

Refers to the proteins present or not present on the surface of red blood cells. The types are a, ...Read more


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What is the universal donor type, if there is one, for organs?

What is the universal donor type, if there is one, for organs?

Blood type O: Blood type o individuals are universal donors and therefore can donate to any blood type recipient: o, a, b, or ab. Also remember that rh factor (+ and -) does not play a role in organs-- it is only relevant for blood transfusions. ...Read more

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When donating a kidney, what is the blood type that is universal? Explain the different blood types for donating. Ex: Rh can donate to a+ etc...

When donating a kidney, what is the blood type that is universal? Explain the different blood types for donating. Ex: Rh can donate to a+ etc...

Blood types: Blood type o negative could be given to all people. People with ab positive type can receive any blood. Blood banks still crossmatch carefully before any blood is transfused, however. ...Read more

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What is isadvantage of blood donation?

What is isadvantage of blood donation?

Few if healthy: I am assuming the message reads 'disadvantage'. If so then the disadvantages are: mild pain at the needle site, volume loss replaceable with oral fluids; iron loss replaceable with oral iron supplements. It is the 'gift of life' for the recipients. ...Read more

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What is the appropriate age of a donor for donating marrow?

What is the appropriate age of a donor for donating marrow?

18-60yr if unrelated: Bone marrow donation programs look for healthy persons ages 18-60 years to be potential "unrelated" donors. Young donors lead to better transplantation results than older donors. Some programs have their maximum donor age set at 55 years. Donors planning to donate to "related" persons (such as siblings, parents, cousins) can be children. I am not aware of a donor being under 4 years old. ...Read more

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What is an apheresis blood donation; what are they taking from the donor?

What is an apheresis blood donation; what are they taking from the donor?

One or more products: Apheresis means "to take away" in greek. Automated instruments can collect specific components from donor's blood. The most commonly collected is platelets, but also plasma or even red cell can be collected simultaneously. The advantage is that donors can choose how they want to contribute in saving lives. If you decide to give platelets or plasma you may give up to 24 times in a year. ...Read more

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What is the record for most blood donated by a single individual?

What is the record for most blood donated by a single individual?

A lot: Just looking it up on the internet: in 2002 one man in the US had donated 213 units over 50 years time; and in 2010 in Australia it is reported that one man had donated 231 units of blood by age 75. One person would typically donate one unit of blood at each time of donation. ...Read more

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What happens if the hospital puts type a blood in a patient that has type b blood are different bloods compatible?

What happens if the hospital puts type a blood in a patient that has type b blood are different bloods compatible?

There : There are 4 basic blood types: a, b, ab, or o. Additionally, each blood type is either rh-positive or rh-negative. If you need a blood transfusion, there needs to be a match between your blood type and the transfusion blood type. People with type o blood are called universal donors because most people can receive type o blood. People with type ab blood are called universal recipients because usually they can receive a transfusion of the other blood types. A person with type a blood can donate blood to a person with type a or type ab blood and can receive blood from a person with type a or type o blood. A person with type b blood can donate blood to a person with type b or type ab and can receive blood from a person with type b or type o. A person with type ab blood can donate blood to a person with type ab and can receive blood from any of the blood types. A person with type o blood can donate to anyone and can receive blood from a person who has type o blood. If the blood types are not matched than antibodies in your body will attack the blood that has been transfused into you and you can become quite ill. If a person with blood type b receives a transfusion of type a blood, the blood cells may clump together and cause a serious reaction. If incompatible blood types are mixed it can cause a fatal reaction. ...Read more

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What is the frequency of hepatitis after a blood transfusion in the us?

Very Unlikely: Our blood supply has been carefully screening fro hepatitis c since 1992, and HIV and hepatitis b before that. It is extremely unlikely that anyone will develop an infection from these viruses after blood transfusion in the us. ...Read more

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What exactly is the basis of blood groups?

What exactly is the basis of blood groups?

Genetics: People who inherit different genes make somewhat different proteins on their cell surfaces. Some have evolved to give resistance to certain illnesses, some are probably random genetic drift. ...Read more

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Can bilirubin from a donors blood affect the recipient since checking for bilirubin levels is not part of the criteria for donation ?

Can bilirubin from a donors blood affect the recipient since checking for bilirubin levels is not part of the criteria for donation
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Not tested: Bilirubin is normal in every person and should not affect the recipient of blood transfusions. Bilirubin levels may be elevated due to underlying disease process, in which case the potential donor should have signs and symptoms making him or her ineligible for donation during the medical screen and physical exam before donation. ...Read more

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What is the meaning of this blood group ab+ve?

Blood type: This means that your blood type is ab positive. Your red cells have the a, b and rh (that's the positive) antigens. You can basically receive any blood type if you need a transfusion. ...Read more

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What is the biggest blood type in the world?

What is the biggest blood type in the world?

O+ and A+: Generally, there is the ABO blood group system (a, b, or ab), and the rh system (+ or --). When in different combinations, each person is one of 8 types. The % of each type varies from country to country. But if take the whole world, i believe 0 positive is most common, a positive next most common (about 2/3). Ab negative is the rarest. O-- is the universal donor. Ab+ is the universal receiver. ...Read more

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Is a woman with sc blood genotype a sickle cell carrier or patient. And what is the health implication of this especially during pregnancy?

Is a woman with sc blood genotype a sickle cell carrier or patient. And what is the health implication of this especially during pregnancy?

Hgb SC: Is a sickle cell syndrome but the genetics are different. A woman with HGB sc will pass either a HGB s gene, or a HGB c gene to her child. It is important to know what kind of HGB the father has-he should have a hemoglobin electrophoresis to find out how the child might be affected. Pregnancy complications are rare, but the baby can have a low weight, and rarely there are complications for the mom. ...Read more

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If your blood type is Rh negative what's the blood type?

If your blood type is Rh negative what's  the blood type?

That is only part : The rh system is the most important determinant of blood type next to the ABO system. You sometimes see that a patient is a+. That means they have blood type a and rhesus positive. You have to know both in order to donate or receive blood. Hope this helps. ...Read more

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What is the health implication and risk of sc blood genotype woman?

What is the health implication and risk of sc blood genotype woman?

Clarification: Are you asking what is the implication of having the sickle cell? A woman can have one gene for sickle cell and this makes her a carrier. Typically carriers who are heterozygous for the disease are asymptomatic. Or, she can have 2 genes (one from each of her parents) of the sickle cell gene and that typically will make her have sickle cell disease. I'm not sure if that answers your question? ...Read more

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What is the significance of a positive IgM & IgG in a patient of typhoid after the patient is asymptomatic? Does the patient need further treatment?

What is the significance of a positive IgM & IgG in a patient of typhoid after the patient is asymptomatic? Does the patient need further treatment?

Not necessarily: The IgM may be a residual of the recent infection, the IgG indicates long-term protection. If you have no symptoms otherwise, no further treatment is needed. If the IgM remains elevated months from now, then it may indicate the presence of a persistent low-grade infection. ...Read more