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Doctor insights on: What Is The Result Of Electrolytes Abnormal In Diabetic Kidney Disease

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Dr. Krishna Kumar
18 doctors shared insights

Diabetic Kidney Problems (Definition)

The diabetes Melitus affects the part of the kidney which filter urine. These are called glomeruli. The dibetese causes the fine blood vessel in the glomeruli to close down, resuting in that filterstion function gradualy decreases to a point that both kidneys stop working. Therefore urine accumulates in the blood. it can be detected by doing blood tests( ...Read more


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What is the likelihood that glycosuria would occur in the absence of diabetes? Will glycosuria cause kidney damage? Would a UTI cause glycosuria?

What is the likelihood that glycosuria would occur in the absence of diabetes? Will glycosuria cause kidney damage? Would a UTI cause glycosuria?

A small minority: of people will have slight glycosuria, either normally or due to a genetic kidney disorder. It doesn't generally cause damage to the kidney; elevated glucose, however, will damage the kidney and many other organs. Discuss w/your doctor. Glycosuria can increase potential for uti, not the other way around unless your blood sugar increases. ...Read more

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What are the consequences of diabetic kidney disease in a child?

What are the consequences of diabetic kidney disease in a child?

Kidney failure: The ultimate "consequence" of diabetic kidney disease is kidney failure and possibility of dialysis or kidney transplant. At this stage, best we can do is help the child control his/her risk factors which is to keep as normal blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol as possible. Keep close contact with his/her physician. ...Read more

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What is the norm in early signs of kidney disease or damage, is it creatnine in blood or is it protein in urine ? Which one usually happens first ?

What is the norm in early signs of kidney disease or damage, is it creatnine in blood or is it protein in urine ? Which one usually happens first ?

Either: Both urine protein and serum creatinine are important. More important are the common causes of kidney disease, e.e., high blood pressure, and diabetes. See this site for more info. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/winter08/articles/winter08pg9-10.html ...Read more

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What is the result of metabolic acidosis if pyloric stenosis?

What is the result of metabolic acidosis if pyloric stenosis?

Bowel obstruction : Then vomiting, dehydration and loss of electrolytes. Gastric contents lost as vomit include acids, leading to a metabolic alkalosis (a 'contraction' alkalosis) with hypokalemia (low potassium), the baby needs to be admitted to a hospital, have intravenous fluids, a surgical consult and surgical repair of the pylorus to relieve the stenosis. It can be performed open or laprascopic. ...Read more

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In cirrhosis does the presence of ascites always indicate decompensation and is this considered a serious complication and stage of the disease?

In cirrhosis does the presence of ascites always indicate decompensation and is this considered a serious complication and stage of the disease?

It is concerning: Ascites- buildup of fluid in the abdominal cavity- can be a sign of serious decompensation in the liver function. This is usually seen in the later stages of liver failure. If this is seen you should let your doctor know right away. This is associated with decreased survival. However if the cause of the liver damage is found early-& treated this can delay progression. Cirrhosis can't be undone. ...Read more

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What is the name of the disorder of the liver could result in excess vitamin B12 in the body?

What is the name of the disorder of the liver could result in excess vitamin B12 in the body?

Cirrhosis: Cirrosis, chronic hepatitis, may cause artifically elevated B12 as the liver store vit B12 and also prodcue the proteins that bind vit B12 in the blood. If the liver is sick, it can not produce the binding proteins and when measured vit B12 appears as it is elevated, as only the un-bound form of vit B12 is measured. ...Read more

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What is the cause of low attenuation lesion in your kidney?

What is the cause of low attenuation lesion in your kidney?

Several causes: Can be a cyst or several possibilities; best to check with your doctor or see a nephrologist. ...Read more

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What are the acceptable potassium levels in a patient with chronic kidney disea?

What are the acceptable potassium levels in a patient with chronic kidney disea?

3.5 to 5.0-5.5: Generally, the potassium should be kept within normal limits just as for a person without renal disease. Most labs have a normal range of 3.5 on the low end and may be anywhere from 5 to 5.5 on the high end. Potassium is less well eliminated by patients with kidney disease and generally with advanced kidney disease, the potassium intake must be reduced. ...Read more

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What is the consequences of high count of white blood cells in renal failure?

What is the consequences of high count of white blood cells in renal failure?

High White Count: A high white count usually indicates that a patient has an infection. When your kidneys fail you are more susceptible to infection for a whole bunch of reasons. The consequence is not so much that your blood count is high, but that you likely have an undiagnosed infection and this needs to be investigated by your dialysis doctor/nephrologist or your primary care doctor. ...Read more

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What is the normal urine output in a case of hypovolemic shock? What are the doctors looking for?

What is the normal  urine output in a case of hypovolemic shock? What are the doctors looking for?

Oliguria: Oliguria or low urine output is defined as less than approximately 350 cc/day. Anuria or absence of urine is less than 50 cc day. Either of these conditions can occur in hypovolemic shock. Treatment of this condition usually requires large amounts of IV fluids and i usually would like to see at least 100/cc of urine per hour to indicate adequate repletion of volume losses. ...Read more

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What is the five condition of albumin in urine?

What is the five condition of albumin in urine?

Homework?: There aren't 'the five causes' -- if your teacher asks for these, try to find the textbook that he/she is using. Most important are orthostatic proteinuria (most common), leaky GBM (diabetes, amyloidoisis, membranous GN & its kindred, minimal change DZ / FSGS / any chronic kidney disease with hyperperfusion); most urinary tract infections, consider tumor. ...Read more

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In what part of the body does uncontrolled hypertension most likely cause ischemia and loss of function?

In what part of the body does uncontrolled hypertension most likely cause ischemia and loss of function?

Heart: Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease (the leading cause of death in north america), stroke (the third leading cause), congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease. ...Read more

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Why is the production of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with renal disease?

Why is the production of erythropoeitin impaired in a patient with renal disease?

Kidneys make it!: Erythropoietin is made by the kidneys. Diseased kidneys make less. Back in the 70's when i was in med school erythropoietin had not been isolated but its' existence was postulated based on the observation that renal patients tended to be anemic. ...Read more

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What is the cause of gastritis in diabetes?

What is the cause of gastritis in diabetes?

Same as nondiabetic: With advancing diabetes, gastroparesis (stomach does not move/function well) can predispose to gastritis. Other causes are same as nondiabetic: helicobacter pylori (bacteria), alcoholism, chronic use of antiinflammatory drugs/chemo, bile reflux, even stress can cause chronic gastritis symptoms and removing the cause will allow healing in few wks, with good nutrition. Consult doc. Good luck. ...Read more

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What is the color of urine following kidney failure?

What is the color of urine following kidney failure?

Variable: After an episode of acute kidney injury urine may look like water as the kidney often cannot appropriately retain water. Sometimes the urine may contain blood and appear red or cola colored. Sometimes the urine looks normal and golden in color. ...Read more

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What could be the significance of low serum albumin in respiratory failure patient?

What could be the significance of low serum albumin in respiratory failure patient?

Protien malnutrition: Albumen is an acute phase reactant and it is difficult to interpret well in the critically ill. That being said, very low albumen can indicate protein malnutrition, making it more difficult to heal wounds, makes drug delivery less reliable (some drugs bind to albumen for transport), make pulmonary edema harder to treat... The list is long. For that reason, we generally feed patients earlier now. ...Read more

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I've hypertension and I have proteinurea and i'm not diabetic, the presence of proteins in urine is it due to kidney disease or to hypertension itself?

I've hypertension and I have proteinurea and i'm not diabetic, the presence of proteins in urine is it due to kidney disease or to hypertension itself?

Proteinuria: Long standing poorly controlled hypertension can cause mild proteinuria even with normal kidney function. But moderate to severe proteinuria due to hypertension is generally associated with abnormal kidney function. suggest you ask your doctor to measure the amount of proteinuria (called random urine protein to creatinine ratio) and refer you to a nephrologist with abnormal result! ...Read more

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Emily Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:
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How many people with diabetic kidney disease develop total kidney failure?

Emily Lu Dr. Lu
3 doctors agreed:
How many people with diabetic kidney disease develop total kidney failure?

20-40%: About 40% of type 1 diabetes patients with kidney disease will develop kidney failure within 20 years without strict blood pressure and glucose control. About 20% of type 2 diabetes patients with kidney disease will develop kidney failure within 20 years, but blood pressure control has seemed to be less effective in completely stopping progression in these patients. ...Read more

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Dr. Jack Rubin
72 doctors shared insights

Diabetic Nephropathy (Definition)

a progressive damaging effects to capillaries in/near glomeruli leading to local inflammatory change and scarring with subsequent malfunction in filtering the blood for reabsorbing useful blood components and excreting the unwanted metabolic wastes, which exact causes are still unclear, though, long-term high blood sugar is the culprit. This is usually a slow ...Read more


Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more