Top
20
Doctor insights on: What Is The Pathophysiology Of Anemia

Share
1

1
What is the pathophysiology of syncope?

What is the pathophysiology of syncope?

Decr brain bloodflow: Syncope (loss of consciousness) is caused by reduced blood flow to the brain. Most cases are cardiogenic in nature (for example, arrhythmias), but other causes can include vasovagal response, carotid artery compression, vertebrobasilar system disease, etc. See your primary care provider for further discussion if you've experienced syncope. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/syncope/syncope.htm ...Read more

Dr. Steven Ginsberg
1,284 doctors shared insights

Anemia (Definition)

A condition marked by a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood, resulting ...Read more


2

2
What is the pathophysiology of hypotension?

What is the pathophysiology of hypotension?

Many: Hypotension or low blood pressure can happen for a variety of reasons. Acute illness (i.e. Sepsis), adrenal gland insufficiency, overmedication, heart failure are just a few of the many reasons for low blood pressure. Additional causes can be volume depletion (orthostasis), or a variety of neurocardiogenic causes such as pots or similar. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
4

4
What exactly is the condition of anemia?

What exactly is the condition of anemia?

Anemia: Simply describes the condition when the patients number of red blood cells are diminished, measured by a decreased hemogloin HGB or hematocrit hct. ...Read more

5

5
What is the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia?

What is the pathophysiology of hypoglycemia?

High insulin: Very common cause of hypoglycemia is high Insulin levels (almost always related to excess sugar and carb intake). Initially the high Insulin causes a reactive hypoglycemia, however over time, the chronically high Insulin levels lead to "insulin resistance". When your Insulin no longer works your blood sugars will rise and you develop diabetes. This is 100% preventable wi proper diet. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
6

6
What is the cause of anemia?

What is the cause of anemia?

3 main causes: Either one is losing blood, destroying blood or it is not being made. Losing blood (menstrual, donation, bleeding), destroying (antibody destruction), bone marrow failure/space occupying disease. Hope this helps. ...Read more

7

7
What is the type of anemia that is hereditary?

What is the type of anemia that is hereditary?

Several: Hemoglobinopathies and enzymopathies are the most common anemias that are hereditary, such as sickle cell anemia, hemoglobin c disease, thalassemia. Absorbtion prorblems can also have a familial predisposition, such as vitamin B12 or iron defficiency. All of these should be able to be easily worked up by a physician, often largely simply by looking at a periferal blood smear. ...Read more

8

8
What is the cause of having macrocytes and hypochromia present? What is the treatment?

What is the cause of having macrocytes and hypochromia present? What is the treatment?

Macrocyte/hypochromi: macrocytes. causes. B12/folate deficiency. or liver disease or myelodysplastic syndrome hypothyroidism,and increased number of reticulocytes as in hemolysis or if agglutinations of RBC may give false high MCV.hypochromia low hgb in the RBC may be low iron .anemia of chronic disease ...Read more

9

9
What is the significance of hypotension anemia?

What is the significance of hypotension anemia?

Black out or more: Hello there - anemia is reduction in red blood cell (rbc) count - and specifically reduction in hemoglobin concentration which is the oxygen carrying agents in the RBC - and yes, anemia will cause hypotension because the blood is thinner and the oncotic pressure (viscosity or concentration pressure) is down - so this compounded effects of low blood pressure and low oxygen carrying capacity is bad. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
10

10
What is the pathophysiology of the ivh?

See attached: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/intraventricular_hemorrhage.

Get a more detailed answer ›
11

11
What is the causes of diabities?

What is the causes of diabities?

Mostly obesity: There are two kinds of diabetes. Type 1 is a genetic accident, or bad luck. It comes on in childhood usually and is a lack of insulin. Type 2 is more likely with a family history, but is strongly tied to obesity. It is caused by a resistance to Insulin initially, rather than a lack of it. I have seen diabetes type 2 go away with enough weight loss. ...Read more

12

12
What is the cause of crainiosynistosis?

What is the cause of crainiosynistosis?

Either: Caused by either hereditary genetic mutations or the following theories.A possible cell defect in the sutires themselves that leads to early fusion.When in the womb, the baby assumes an irregular position.If pressure was being put on the baby's head, the plates of bone in the skull might be pushed together & caused the sutures to fuse. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
Dr. Irv Loh Dr. Loh
1 doctor agreed:
13

13
What is the pathophysiology of the defibrillator?

Dr. Irv Loh Dr. Loh
1 doctor agreed:
What is the pathophysiology of the defibrillator?

Rhythm restoration: Assuming the problem is ventricular fibrillation, the chaotic and fatal cardiac arrhythmia, one must know there are hierarchies of pacemakers controlling the heart rhythm (fastest one usually wins). By shocking the heart into functional standstill, the next available fastest stable pacemaker tissue takes over, usually sinus node > ectopic atrial > junctional > idioventricular/purkinje. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
14

14
What is the cause of hyperthyriodism?

What is the cause of hyperthyriodism?

Misfortune: Just plan old genetics, iodine issues and we don't know. See https://online.Epocrates.Com/u/291134/toxic+thyroid+adenoma. ...Read more

15

15
What is the cause of cardiomegaly?

What is the cause of cardiomegaly?

Many: Many causes :virus or alcohol or obesity or hypertension or clogged coronary arteries to name a few. ...Read more

16

16
What is the cause of hypotension?

Many causes: Hypotension can be caused by many causes - sometimes it is normal, other times by medications or metaboloic conditions such as low thyroid. Hypotension causing shock can be hypovolemic (from loss of blood), cardiogenic (heart function not working well), obstructive (pulmonary embolism causing blood vessel obstruction), or distriubutive (think sepsis, low adrenal function, anaphyaxis, toxins). ...Read more

17

17
What is the prognosis of porphyria?

What is the prognosis of porphyria?

Very challenging: Porphyrias are life-long diseases with symptoms that come and go. Some forms of the disease cause more symptoms than others. Proper treatment and avoidance of triggers can help prolong the time between attacks. But attacks are quite painful and can be fatal. Life is a real struggle for someone with porphyria but it is possible to even do great things - some historical figures have suffered it. ...Read more

18

18
What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

What is the physiology and pathophysiology of rheumatic fever?

Rheumatic fever: Rheumatic fever is caused by a streptococcal infection triggering a specific immune response. Acutely various joint aches and pains occur accounting for the 'rheumatic' term. Long term the mitral and/or aortic valves are often involved with chronic inflammation and damaged. We see rf rarely in the us now, but sometimes in new immigrants. ...Read more

19

19
What is the cause of somebody's agammaglobulinemia?

What is the cause of somebody's agammaglobulinemia?

Genetic mutation: Disease of plasma cells or b cells in which inadequate ( very low or none) amounts of antibodies (globulin) of the gamma type are produced . The cause is primarily an x linked genetic mutation. ...Read more

Dr. Alfred Kim Dr. Kim
2 doctors agreed:
20

20
What is the cause of lupus?

Dr. Alfred Kim Dr. Kim
2 doctors agreed:
What is the cause of lupus?

Genes, environment: This answer will change as we know more about lupus. We believe that for a person to get lupus, from the limited genetic information we have now, about 10% is from known genetic causes and remaining 90% unknown genetic causes and environmental causes. Environmental causes are largely undefined but important. Think about this: only 30% of identical twins develop lupus together. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer