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Doctor insights on: What Is The Impact On The Body Of Arteriosclerosis

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What is the impact on the body of arteriosclerosis?

What is the impact on the body of arteriosclerosis?

Depends: It depends upon the location of the atherosclerosis. In the brain arteries, it causes neurologic deficits and stroke. In the heart it causes chest pain and heart attacks. In the kidneys it causes hypertension and renal failure. In the legs it causes claudication (leg pain when walking). ...Read more

Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
243 Doctors shared insights

Arteriosclerosis (Definition)

It is the hardening of the arteries commonly associated with natural aging ...Read more


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What does arteriosclerosis do in the body?

What does arteriosclerosis do in the body?

Deposits cholesterol: Atherosclerosis occurs when cholesterol deposits called plaque form in the wall of your arteries. If the plaque gets big enough it can block flow of blood causing injury to the tissue that was supplied by the artery. That is how heart attacks, strokes, leg ulcers, etc occur. ...Read more

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What happens in the body with arteriosclerosis?

What happens in the body with arteriosclerosis?

Limits to blood flow: In arteriosclerosis, cholesterol builds up in the walls of the artery compromising the inside of the artery where blood flows. The end result can be limitations in blood flow to the brain, heart, intestines, kidney, and extremities. The symptoms are particular to the organ affected. ...Read more

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How does arteriosclerosis impact an individual's cardiovascular health?

Significantly: Coronary heart disease is a direct manifestation of atherosclerosis and can significantly impact one's health. ...Read more

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What is arteriosclerosis?

CVD: It is hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries - this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer. This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body. The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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Is arteriosclerosis inherited?

Sort of: Well it's not inherited like your eye color but the tendency to develop it is inherited related to many factors. High cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes and other risk factors are also inherited to a degree. So the bottom line is that if your parents have arteriosclerosis you are at greater risk. It would be even more important to modify your risk factors. ...Read more

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Is arteriosclerosis reversible?

Not really: Don't believe everything you hear. Atherosclerosis can be stabilized with current meds/treatments but significant regression (>10%) is extremely difficult to demonstrate in humans. Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease. There is no "cure". ...Read more

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Why is arteriosclerosis chronic?

It progresses: Because once it develops it is not very reversible. It tends to get progressinvely worse as you age. You can slow down the process or even in some cases reverse it by eliminatiing your risk factors. ...Read more

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How is arteriosclerosis treated?

Treatment options: Arteriosclerosis has several contributing risk factors. Not all are known but many we do. Agressive treatment of the modifiable risk factors is the key to treatment. Also weather you are treating a patient for primay prevention (no history of mi or stroke) or secondary
(pt had mi, cva, bypass surgery etc.).Regardless exercise good diet smoke cessation and good controll of BP and diabetes and wt loss. ...Read more

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What can arteriosclerosis cause?

Plethora of problems: Arteriosclerosis/atherosclerosis can result in a plethora of problems such as erectile dysfunction, claudication, dementia, heart attacks, strokes, and premature death. ...Read more

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When does arteriosclerosis start?

When does arteriosclerosis start?

Early: The process of atherosclerosis can actually begin in our late teens and early twenties; although the consequences may not manifest for many years. Autopsy examination from young people dying in wars and trauma has revealed early signs of atherosclerosis in these individuals. ...Read more

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What happens in arteriosclerosis?

Progressive blockage: It is a progressive hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries - this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer. This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body. The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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Which people get arteriosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis: Anybody can...
Risks include:
1. Genetics
2. Untreated high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol/triglycerides, diabetes.
3. Smoking
4.Obesity, low functional capacity (lack of exercise)
5. Age and gender. ...Read more

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How can you cure arteriosclerosis?

How can you cure arteriosclerosis?

Manage: There is no cure for atherosclerosis but you can manage it: quit smoking!, lose weight: BMI <28, control blood pressure, control cholesterol, exercise every day (clear program with your doctor), take prescribed medications, control blood sugar, change diet to low fat, low sugar. Take care of yourself and you can control this disease process! ...Read more

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Why is arteriosclerosis dangerous?

Why is arteriosclerosis dangerous?

Blocks blood flow: Arteriosclerosis is dangeous if it restricts blood flow to vital organs by causing build-up of plaque that narrows the inside of arteries. However the most potential for harm comes from the rare instances where atherosclerotic plaques may become inflamed and suddently activate clotting components, leading to a sudden complete (or near-complete) obstruction of blood flow. ...Read more

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What does arteriosclerosis lead to?

Blockage (s): It leads to progressive hardening of the arteries, caused by fat, cholesterol, and other substances building up in the arteries-this is called plaque - making the arteries stiffer. This plaque interferes with the normal function of the arteries and can cause problems and symptoms throughout the body. The plaque can block the arteries and/or it can break off and flow to smaller vessels and block them. ...Read more

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Who is at risk for arteriosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis: Those with family history, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, overweight, men and post-menopausal women. There is a web site for framingham risk profile to check your individual risk. ...Read more

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How can I reverse arteriosclerosis?

Reverse arterioscler: If you find out, please let the rest of us know. The only studies to show reversal have been with high dose statins and rigorous diet and they show only small amount of reversal in some people. At present our best recommendations are mediterranean type diet, regular aerobic exercise, not smoking, blood pressure control and perhaps statins. If not reversal this at least slows progression in most. ...Read more

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Are there cures for arteriosclerosis?

Not really: There is no cure for arteriosclerosis. Everyone is going to have some arteriosclerosis if you live long enough. You can slow progression of arteriosclerosis by controlling your risk factors: blood pressure goal <130/80mmhg;
ldl goal< 100mg/dl;
daily aerobic exercise > 45 minutes;
not smoking;
staying close to normal BMI of < 25kg/m2;
if you are diabetic, keep good control with A1c goal < 7. ...Read more