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Doctor insights on: What Is The Function Of An Axon Terminal

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What is the function of an axon terminal?

What is the function of an axon terminal?

Transmission: The axon transmits the electrical signal from the nerve to the next nerve or a muscle through the neuromuscular junction.

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What are axons?

What are axons?

Axons: Are nerve fibers that come out of nerve cells (Neurons) & conduct electrical impulses away from the neurons, to transmit information to different tissues.

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What is a axon test? How is it done?

Concussion test: It is a concussion test that can accurately diagnose concussion injuries. The test uses well known playing cards and measures reaction time and memory.

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What is the axon and what does it do?

What is the axon and what does it do?

Axon: Nerve fiber projecting from nerve cell (Neuron), conducting electrical impulses to send information to other neurons & muscles & glands.

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Which diseases or disorders affect axons?

Which diseases or disorders affect axons?

Numerous: If the axon affected is located in arms or legs, this is a peripheral neuropathy, if in spinal cord, perhaps a myelopathy, and brain and eyes, neuritis, encephalopathy.

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Describe how a nerve impulse is transmitted along to axon?

Describe how a nerve impulse is transmitted along to axon?

It's complex: 1. Polarization of the neuron's membrane; 2. Resting potential gives the neuron a rest; 3. Action potential: sodium ions move inside the membrane; 4. Repolarization: potassium ions move outside, and sodium ions stay inside the membrane; 5. Hyperpolarization: more potassium ions are on the outside than there are sodium ions on the inside; 6. Refractory period puts everything back to normal.

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What are the symptoms of axon degeneration?

What are the symptoms of axon degeneration?

VARIES: Several peripheral neuropathies are considered "axonal" problems, and these include alcohol nutritional, diabetes, solvent poisoning, porphyria, amyloidosis, but small fibre axonal problems may be seen in sarcoid, sjogren's, lupus, paraproteinemias, celiac disease. Symptoms include pain, numbness, weakness, inability to discern hot/cold. Perhaps problems with balance.

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What is the role of the axon in learning and development?

Arms and legs: The neuron is the cell of the brain that is involved in learning and development. They need to be connected to other neurons to communicate. The axon is the arms or legs of the neuron that connect one neuron from another one. Without them, no communication and no learning and development.

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How can novocain (procaine) works on axon membrane?

How can novocain (procaine) works on axon membrane?

Sodium channels: Local anesthetics work on the neuron's sodium channels inhibiting ion exchange and therefore depolarization of the nerve.

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What is axonopathy of small cutaneous sensory axons? And what are treatments/prognosis?

As above: Not every problem can be answered without. Evaluation; see u pcp for evaluation and advise.

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If the immune system attacked killed the neurons cell body axons dendrites nerves throughout the body is it possible and what diagnosis would this be?

If the immune system attacked killed the neurons cell body axons dendrites nerves throughout the body is it possible and what diagnosis would this be?

Complicated: This description is quite improbable and sounds as it the person may be deceased. If you are having neurological deficiencies stronglysuggest that you see a neurologist and be evaluated. Good luck.

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Could lidocaine block the na channels at the ap or at the dendrites (before or after the axon hillock). Is it possible an ap fires?

Could lidocaine block the na channels at the ap or at the dendrites (before or after the axon hillock). Is it possible an ap fires?

Nonspecific: Na channell blockade is a characteristic of lidocaine, that what allows it's use not only as a local anesthetic, but as antiarrhythmic agent as well. Although I must admit that I did not completely understand your question, the answer is yes, to my opinion. Hopefully you will be helped more by my colleagues, good luck.

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Would presence of rabies virus in the cytosol of an axon cause pain?

Would presence of rabies virus in the cytosol of an axon cause pain?

Contributing factor: In later stage rabies, inflammation of affected tissues (such as neurons) could contribute to pain. For a detailed review of the pathogenesis of rabies, see http://www. Ncbi. Nlm. Nih. Gov/pmc/articles/pmc2600441/.

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Can the rabies virus replicate in the cytosol of an axon as opposed to the axons cell body?

Nucleus not needed: Viral replication can occur wit no host protein requirement. However, viral particle assembly does require the host's golgi apparatus. Please see the following for an in depth review of the pathogenesis of rabies: http://www. Ncbi. Nlm. Nih. Gov/pmc/articles/pmc2600441/.

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Emg rpt. Chronic inactive assymet myopathic process, left leg. Changes supported of chron inactive axon loss. And Rt l5 radiculopathy. Pls explain. Ty?

Emg rpt. Chronic inactive assymet myopathic process, left leg. Changes supported of chron inactive axon loss. And Rt l5 radiculopathy. Pls explain. Ty?

Lumbar disk: Hits a nerve. (radiculopathy) the wiring to the muscle is sorta kinda lost (axon loss). the muscle weakens because it ain't doing nothin (chronic inactive myopathic... blah blah). rather an indication for surgery.

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With peripheral neuropathy, what conditions could cause damage to both axons and myelin as shown in nerve conduction tests? And can it be reversed?

With peripheral neuropathy, what conditions could cause damage to both axons and myelin as shown in nerve conduction tests? And can it be reversed?

Brief explanation: Most neuropathies affect myelin coverings (Schwann cell), but an advancing axonal neuropathy can secondarily affect the myelin. This is not simple, and you would be far better served by a Concierge consult, and/or find an experienced Medical School neurologist. Reversibility depends on causes and appropriate therapy.

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For foot drop from a B12 deficiency, is the axon or myelin covering most often impacted?

For foot drop from a B12 deficiency, is the axon or myelin covering most often impacted?

Foot Drop: Most often is is the myelin sheath or insulation that is impacted. If the axons are effected it takes longer to recover if the causative reason is addressed. At about the 3 week mark after the occurrence it is easy to document the actual injury and extent with electrodiagnostic testing (ncs/emg). This would tell if demyelinating, axonal or combination of the two. This can help define prognosis.

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Can stem cells be used for regeneration of oligodendrocytes to remyelinate axons that have been degenerated due to alcoholism?

Can stem cells be used for regeneration of oligodendrocytes to remyelinate axons that have been degenerated due to alcoholism?

There is no evidence: For this to be the case presently. Unfortunately there is limited data in regards to the use of stems cell for most applications. Beyond stem cell transplants for bone marrow related disorders there are some accepted stem cell therapies for bone, skin and corneal diseases. There really isn't much presently for neurologic disorders. Maybe in the future though.