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Doctor insights on: What Is The Difference Between Meningitis And Meningococcal Infection

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Is there a difference between meningitis and meningococcal infection?

Is there a difference between meningitis and meningococcal infection?

Yes: Meningitis is a general term which refers to any process resulting in inflammation or swelling of the lining of the brain or spinal cord. Meningococcal meningitis refers specifically to meningitis caused by the bacteria neisseria meningitidis. Several bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites may cause meningitis. Meningococcal meningitis is one of the most severe. ...Read more

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Dr. Julie Abbott
9 doctors shared insights

Infection (Definition)

Infections are invasions of some other organism (fungus, bacteria, parasite) or viruses into places where they do not belong. For instance, we have normal gut bacteria that live within us without causing problems; however, when those penetrate the bowel wall and enter the bloodstream, ...Read more


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What is the time line of a meningococcal meningitis infection?

What is the time line of a meningococcal meningitis infection?

Dead in 24 hours: This is a devastatingly horrific disease. Patients go from initial fever, to very ill, to fulminant sepsis, hypotension, shock and death within 24 to 48 hours. When patients call at night after three days of fever in a small child, we pediatricians actually breath a sigh of relief. "This is not a child with meningitis, we think to ourselves" We are always more concerned about new onset fever ...Read more

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What is the difference between meningococcal sepsis and meningococcal meningitis?

What is the difference between meningococcal sepsis and meningococcal meningitis?

Location: Organinsm is the same, location is different. Sepsis is a blood infection. Meningitis is a spinal fluid infection. ...Read more

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So not all meningitis is caused by n. Meningitis? And not all "meningococcal disease" is meningitis?

So not all meningitis is caused by n. Meningitis? And not all "meningococcal disease" is meningitis?

No: There are a number of bacteria beside n. Meningitidis that can cause meningitis. The most common manifestation of Meningococcal infection is 'flu-like illness.' meningitis by n. Meningitidis is easily treatable and serious neurologic sequelae is uncommon. ...Read more

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Who is at risk for meningococcal meningitis?

Who is at risk for meningococcal meningitis?

Risk for meningitis: Meningococcal meningitis is an infections disease, spread by close contact with infected individuals or carriers of meningococcus. The risk is high in populations such as college student, camps and schools, especially boarding schools. Known contacts of infected individuals should consult their doctor about the need for prophylactic treatment. ...Read more

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Emily Lu Dr. Lu
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How do inmates get meningococcal meningitis?

Emily Lu Dr. Lu
2 doctors agreed:
How do inmates get meningococcal meningitis?

Air transmission: Meningococcus is spread through the air and so can be transmitted by sick individuals and carriers of the disease to anyone that they are in close contact with. ...Read more

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How long does meningococcal meningitis last for?

How long does meningococcal meningitis last for?

Infection vs sequela: The duration of treatment depends on the presentation. If it was caught early and appropriate antibiotics were started the studies have shown that the CSF is sterilized before the 4th day (in immunocompetent patients). If it was more advanced, associated with bacteremia and sepsis then 7 days is the norm. About 10% of individuals will suffer from long-lasting sequelae that will need further help. ...Read more

Dr. William Singer
811 doctors shared insights

Meningitis (Definition)

Meningitis occurs when the membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord becomes inflamed. Symptoms include headaches, fever, stiff neck, and a sensitivity to light. There are two primary types of ...Read more