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Doctor insights on: What Is Renal Blastoma

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What causes a non-cancerous blastoma?

What causes a non-cancerous blastoma?

No Idea: Who told you about it? That same person can answer your question. ...Read more

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What is the difference between a teratoma and a blastoma?

What is the difference between a teratoma and a blastoma?

Separate tumors: A teratoma is a tumor with tissue from an organ resembling normal derivatives of more than one germ layer. They may contain hair, teeth, bone and, very rarely, more complex structures They are usuallly benign. The Blastoma is a tumor thought to arise in embryonic tissue and becomes associated with part of the name of the organ from which it was derived such as neuroblastoma, glioblastoma. ...Read more

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Can an adult have medula blastoma?

Can an adult have medula blastoma?

Yes adults can: Meduloblastoma is a malignant tumor that originate in Cerebellum or Posterior fossa
it is ten times more common in children than in adults ...Read more

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If a glio blastoma multeform is detected early, is it possible to resect with a a total successful conclusion.

If a glio blastoma multeform is detected early, is it possible to resect with a a total successful conclusion.

Yes it is possible: In general dbm is a very bad cancer. Yet a total tumor resection along with chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cure a very small percentage of patients (5-10%). ...Read more

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What are some blastoma cancers?

What are some blastoma cancers?

Blastomas: Blastoma are most common in children, and are caused by malignancies in precursor cells, called blasts. Some examples include nephroblastoma, medulloblastoma and retinoblastoma. ...Read more

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What are all the blastoma cancers you know of?

What are all the blastoma cancers you know of?

Many types: 'Blastoma' cancers are uncommon forms of malignancies that generally happen in infants/children/young adults. These tumors are sometimes named based upon the organs in which they arise, such as 'retinoblastoma' of the eye, 'hepatoblastoma' of the liver, 'pancreatoblastoma' of the pancreas, pleuropulmonary blastoma' of the lung. Some of these tumors are amenable to surgical and other treatments. ...Read more

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Could you tell me a cure for retino blastoma. Cause cure and if hereditary, how to cure it. Please help?

Could you tell me a cure for retino blastoma. Cause cure and if hereditary, how to cure it. Please help?

NCI web link!!!: Retinoblastoma is a cancer that forms in the tissues of the retina (the light-sensitive layers of nerve tissue at the back of the eye). Retinoblastoma usually occurs in children younger than 5 years. It may be hereditary or nonhereditary (sporadic). Treatment depends upon tumor limited to eye or has spread beyond eye. Http://www. Cancer. Gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/retinoblastoma/patient. ...Read more

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What causes renal problems?

What causes renal problems?

Many conditions: Urinary infection, kidney stones, diabetese, blood pressure, tumors in the kidney, multiple cyst in the kidneys and many others ...Read more

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What is renal reserve?

What is renal reserve?

Physiology: This is one more way to see how good a person's kidney function is, to decide for example whether they can be a donor. A person may be given a radioisotope and their ability to clear it measured before and after they take a protein meal. It's a test of the ability of the kidney to increase its filtration rate (as when stimulated by a protein load.) ask a nephrologist how useful it is. ...Read more

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How serious is renal failure?

How serious is renal failure?

It depends: Usually it depends on the reason, the severity and person health. While renal failure due to dehydration and obstruction (stones, prostate in a man)is reversible most of the the time, renal failure due to intrinsic kidney problems is sometimes hard to treat. ...Read more

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What exactly is a renal diet?

What exactly is a renal diet?

Protein/Fluid Limits: The kidney is responsible for excreting waste and maintaining an electrolyte balance. Patients with kidney disease can have a decreased capacity to do the aforementioned, so "renal diets" are focused on limiting proteins (which are metabolized into kidney-excreted wastes like urea), fluids, and electrolyte fluctuations. This is analogous to "diabetic diets" controlling blood glucose fluctuations. ...Read more

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What causes renal insufficiency?

Descriptor only: Renal insufficiency is a descriptor that your kidney function is not 100% of normal. Usually providers call a function between 60-99% insufficiency. The cause could be anything from incorrect lab (the calculated function is an estimate only), taking Ibuprofen regularly, recurrent kidney infections, hypertension, diabetes and glomerulonephritis (kidney filter inflammation). See your provider. ...Read more

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What factors affect renal failure?

What factors affect renal failure?

Renal failure: High blood pressure and prolonged uncontrolled diabetes and recurrent urine infection are BIG factors escalating renal disease to progress towards failure ...Read more

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What can I eat with renal disease?

What can I eat with renal disease?

Depends: On the level of kidney function. Patients with advanced kidney function stage iv-v have to restrict potassium, phosphorus etc in the diet. Stage i-iii kidney disease have fewer dietary restriction. ...Read more

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End stage renal failure, what to do?

End stage renal failure, what to do?

ESRD options: Patients with esrd have 4 options. One is hemodialysis (h), either at a dialysis center, doing regular or nocturnal h, or doing h at home. The second is, peritoneal dialysis. Esrd patients can receive a transplant for either a living related or a cadaveric donor. The 4th option is one that very few patients consider, and that is not starting dialysis at all leading to a fatal outcome. ...Read more

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What are the causes of renal failure?

What are the causes of renal failure?

Multiple causes: I concur with dr. Griffiths' answer in general. However, one of very common and important cause should be added, namely poorly controlled diabetes. Among the kidney diseases, minimal change lesion is very unlikely to lead to renal failure. ...Read more

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What is renal gel and why is it used?

What is renal gel and why is it used?

Renagel: Renagel is a phosphorus binder. It is used by people with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease to help treat high phosphorus levels in the blood. You take them with your meals and they bind the phosphorus in foods preventing it from building up in the blood. ...Read more

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What is a renal denervation procedure?

What is a renal denervation procedure?

Renal denervation: The answer is too long for the space allowed. Please go to this link for a detailed answer to your question:

http://www. Mayoclinic. Org/medical-professionals/clinical-updates/cardiovascular/treatment-hypertension-catheter-based-radiofrequency-renal-artery-sympathetic-denervation ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of renal disease?

What are the symptoms of renal disease?

Edema, fatigue: There are many different types of renal diseases with different symptoms. Symptoms may include: swelling in legs/around eyes (edema), malaise (not feeling well), fatigue, foamy urine, blood in urine, pain in kidney area (flank), decreased or increased urinary output (decreased or increased urination). These symptoms are not specific for kidney diseases and can be associated with other conditions. ...Read more

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What is the management of renal failure?

What is the management of renal failure?

Dialysis: Early on it can be managed with dietary changes. Later on dialysis is needed to remove the impurities from the blood. The kidney transplant is the permanent treatment. ...Read more

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What if you have reduced renal function?

What if you have reduced renal function?

Nephrologist: Impaired kidney function is serious. The cause must be determined. I recommend that you consult a nephrologist for evaluation and treatment. Appropriate tests will be ordered. ...Read more

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How long can you live with renal failure?

How long can you live with renal failure?

Weeks to many years: Complex question. Relates to what is causing it, at what stage it is diagnosed, the quality and consistency of care one receives (as with any chronic illness), the quality of the renal program if one needs dialysis, or renal transplant, whether complications from all the medications needed occur, whether transplant is rejected, whether donor kidney available when needed etc etc etc. ...Read more

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Which foods are included on a renal diet?

Which foods are included on a renal diet?

Low protein: Low dairy, low potassium. The latter means restrict potaoes, oranges, bananas, and squash. Also, strict low salt intake under 2000mg of sodium per day.

Renal diet should be associated with fluid restriction under 1.5 quarts per day of all kinds of fluid intake. Not encouraging fluids like most people think! ...Read more

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What're the renal insufficiency symptoms?

What're the renal insufficiency symptoms?

Renal failure: Renal insufficiency is often asymptomatic initially. However as renal function deteriorates, you get a build up of toxin in the blood which cause nausea, vomiting, fatigue, shortness of breath, tremor/twitching, daytime somnolence, food can begin to taste bad....This is usually after the kidney function is less than 30% (often less than 15%). ...Read more

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How do you define end-stage renal disease?

How do you define end-stage renal disease?

See Below: End stage renal disease is stage five CKD or GFR 15 or less. Dialysis is started when the function of the kidneys is inadequate to remove the metabolic byproducts of metabolism. In practice this is usually determined by measuring gfr. Most people have to start dialysis when GFR drops to 10-15 though it may have to be started higher or lower than that. ...Read more

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How can a cough develop into renal problems?

How can a cough develop into renal problems?

Cough: Coughing is rarely a sign of renal disease. Coughing is usually due to factors other than kidney disease. One common cause of non=productive cough, especially at night time, is gastro-esophogeal reflux disease. See a physician and have your blood tested to see if you have any kidney disease and see if you can find a cause for your cough. Good luck. ...Read more

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What are common renal insufficiency symptoms?

What are common renal insufficiency symptoms?

Vague: Kidney failure is notorious for causing very vague nebulous symptoms sometimes like, fatigue, insomnia, nausea, decreased appetite, metallic taste in the mouth, etc. I have a more comprehensive list on my blog at http://www. Kidneydoctorbradenton. Org/2013/04/what-are-signs-and-symptoms-of-ckd. Html. ...Read more

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What are mild left renal caliectasis outcomes?

What are mild left renal caliectasis outcomes?

Excellent, unless:-: Caliectasis is due to obstruction from tumor.. ...Read more

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Help plz! Can renal failure be cured entirely?

Renal failure treatm: Renal failure is irreversible, can be controlled unlikely to be cured, options would be renal dialysis, in end stage failure transplant, requiring anti rejection meds, even trap landed kidneys can fail ...Read more

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What is the best management for renal disease?

What is the best management for renal disease?

A good Nephrologist: General principals would include control of hypertension, relief of any kidney obstruction, adequate hydration (assuming kidney function is not severely reduced), good control of diabetes, if present. Depending on renal function varying degrees of sodium, potassium, and protein dietary restriction may be required. ...Read more

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How to control phorphorus during renal disease?

How to control phorphorus during renal disease?

Phosphorus control: If you are talking about reducing elevated phosphorus (P) levels in patients with kidney failure, P levels are brought down by two drugs. One is P binders that prevent P from being absorbed in the intestine. If those patients have high parathyroid hormone levels (PTH), drugs like cinacalcet reduce serum P levels by preventing it and calcium from being liberated from the bone by PTH. ...Read more

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How much time will end stage renal disease last?

It depends: With hemodialysis, it can be years. Without HD, probably only months depending on how severe is the kidney failure. ...Read more

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What does it mean when your put on a renal diet?

Renal Diet: Wastes in the blood come from food and liquids that are consumed. People with kidney disease must adhere to a kidney diet to cut down on the amount of waste in their blood. Following a kidney diet may also bolster kidney function and delay total kidney failure.A kidney diet is one that is low in sodium, phosphorous and protein.Every person is different, a dietician will work with each patient. ...Read more

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I was wondering what are signs of renal failure?

Renal failure signs: Signs of renal failure (rf) are high potassium, bun, phosphate intact parathyroid hormone and creatinine levels. Others are, a low hemoglobin, blood carbon dioxide, acidosis, and calcium levels. Symptoms of rf are anorexia, nausea, vomiting, easy bleeding, and reversal of day-night sleeping patterns. ...Read more

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What is good renal function in your later years?

What is good renal function in your later years?

Renal function: The better the renal function, the better the overall prognosis. As people age, they lose some renal function (change in muscle mass, senescence of the kidney). Each person is individual as to what function they need to survive and function well. Usually a creatinine clearance above 30% is enough to keep one off dialysis and functioning well, but it depends on the patient. ...Read more

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Would like more information on renal transplants?

Would like more information on renal transplants?

Transplant: Kidney transplant is the best option for most patients when their kidney function has progessed to end stage renal disease (less than 15% function). This results in improvement in renal function, BP and clinical status. The big drawback is that you are on life long immunosupression. ...Read more

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What foods can you safely eat with renal failure?

What foods can you safely eat with renal failure?

Diet in CRF: Great question. There are many and I would ask that you go to either http://www. Davita. Com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/lifestyle/top-15-healthy-foods-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/5347 or https://www. Kidney. Org/nutrition. I would recommend you talk to your doctor about all of this. There are foods that you should avoid and these resources will tell you what they are. ...Read more