Top
20
Doctor insights on: What Is Malignant Intracranial Hypertension

Share
1

1
Is pseudo-tumo cerebri and intracranial hypertension the same thing?

Is pseudo-tumo cerebri and intracranial hypertension the same thing?

Benign: Pseudo tumor cerebri and benign intracranial hypertension are similar. They often present with obesity and a severe confusing headache. The pressure can be damaging to the eyes and cause sight impairment so while it can be treated, it needs to be picked up early. ...Read more

Dr. Eric Weisman
323 doctors shared insights

Hypertension (Definition)

A blood pressure reading has two numbers: a systolic blood pressure and a diastolic blood pressure. The systolic blood pressure is the maximum pressure the blood exerts on the vessels when the heart is beating. The diastolic blood pressure is the pressure the blood exerts on the vessels in between heartbeats. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, begins when the systolic blood pressure remains above 140 or when the diastolic blood pressure remains above 90. Hypertension can be a result of increased blood flow through vessels or increased resistance to ...Read more


2

2
What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Unknown cause: Ideopathic means unknown. Pressure in the brain is usually due to tumor or infection. If these are ruled out, the pressure is considered ideopathic. Another term can be pseudo tumor. There can be normal pressure hydrocephalus in the elderly, but reducing "pressure" makes them better. ...Read more

3

3
Had my idiopathic intracranial hypertension came back?

Had my idiopathic intracranial hypertension came back?

Pseudotumor cerebri: This is a serious disorder and there are a number of treatments available including medication to reduce the pressure. There is also a surgical procedure that requires placing a tube in the spine canal and diverting excess spinal fluid into the abdomen. If you are seeing a neurologist for this the various options can be explained more fully ...Read more

5

5
What're the tests for idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

What're the tests for idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Spinal tap: The most direct test is to measure pressure in the spinal fluid. This is done with a spinal tap and pressure measuring column. The fluid column is measured, and then the fluid is drained off. Just draining the fluid can relieve symptoms. Analysis of the fluid would rule out more serious conditions. This procedure is easily performed in a doctor's office or emergency room. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
6

6
Do you know anything on idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

PseudoTumor Cerebri: Also called Benign Intracranial Hypertension or Psedotumo Cerebri It is a neurological disorder in ehich there is increased Intracranial Pressure when there is no tumor other disease Symptoms are Headache Nausea and Vomiting and pulsating sounds in the ears,double vision.It can lead to swelling of theoptic nerve if not treated&loss of vision Diagnosed by Brain Scan&LP Treated with rpt LPs& Diamox (acetazolamide) ...Read more

8

8
What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension and what causes it ?

Pseudotumor Cerebri: Condition results in abnormal accumulation of too much intracranial fluid, causing headaches, changes in visual acuity, and obscurational attacks. It seems related to obesity, menstrual and hormonal dysfunction, cerebral vein obstruction, toxins such as high levels of vitamin A, certain antibiotic reactions, and more, BUT not clear why the system fails. Diamox (acetazolamide) and brain shunting may help. ...Read more

9

9
Does visual acuity decrease in cases of intracranial hypertension?

Sometimes: Many times patients develop transient obscurations of vision, or brief episodes of blurry vision. These are temporary if treatment ensues promptly. Long term high intracranial pressure can produce permanent defects in vision due to damage of the optic nerve. This condition needs to be closely monitored by both neurologists and ophthalmologists. ...Read more

10

10
What are the kinds of tests used for idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Spinal tap: The neurologic exam and the history obtained by the neurologist are the starting point. Examination of the eyes and the fundi of the eye can give information about whether or not there is pressure transmitted to the optic apparatus. Ct scans or mris rule out any mass lesion or obstructive hydrocephalus.A spinal tap is done to document the CSF pressure and if there is any relief with removal of csf. ...Read more

13

13
I have idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Recently I have been falling down a lot of an average a month. Should i be worried?

Maybe. See your doct: See your doctor or a neurologist or neurosurgeon. Increased intracranial pressure can cause symptoms with poor balance, walking problems, ataxia, etc and you should be evaluated professionally soon. ...Read more

14

14
Diagnosed with Intracranial Hypertension. But unable to get back with a normal life. Now, I got multiples lumps in head. Don't know what to do?

Diagnosed with Intracranial Hypertension. But unable to get back with a normal life. Now, I got  multiples lumps in head. Don't know what to do?

HealthTap Prime: Not sure what you mean by "lumps in head". Intracranial hypertension (or pseudotumor cerebri) is usually diagnosed by lumbar puncture (spinal tap) & measuring the opening pressure. It does not cause any skull defect or "lump" as you put it, unless there is some other reason ("non-idiopathic"). In that case, there's usually a history of cancer. Use HTap Prime & TTYD about your symptoms. Good luck. ...Read more

15

15
I am currently being treated for intracranial hypertension. My headaches have been getting worse. Excedrin helps, but don't want to take that daily. ?

Intrcranial HTN: How are you being treated? Could be increased pressure which effects vision, balance, cognition or other process Treatment usually is diamox, w/ propanolol, amytriptyline, or toprimate for headaches Steroids or surgery for vision effects. Check vision every 1-2 weeks. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1214410-treatment#d8 Call neurologist today or get second opnion ...Read more

16

16
What are the signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Hypertesnion: Most common symptoms are headaches, if the pressure gets high visual blurriness and visual loss can also occur. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
17

17
With patients diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, what gets done?

With patients diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, what gets done?

Pseudotumor cerebri: The treatment is based on diagnosis and the amount of pressure plus visual issues and more importantly visual loss - the treatment plan is typically put together with a neurologist and a neurosurgeon working together. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
18

18
What's the difference between hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

Hydrocephalus or IIH: Hydrocephalus usually refers to a condition in which the cerebrospinal (CSF) fluid that surrounds the brain becomes trapped in the ventricles where much of this fluid is stored and the ventricles become dilated. There are many known causes. Iih is a condition in which the pressure is increased in the head but the ventricles are not dilated. The cause of iih remains less clear. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer
19

19
What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension and what can it cause left sided headaches ?

What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension and what can it cause left sided headaches

?

IIH: It's a disorder where elevated pressure in the head can cause vision loss & headache. Left-sided headaches suggest migraine more than IIH. If IIH, headache should be worst upon awakening. Diagnosis shouldn't be made without seeing an ophthalmologist to confirm papilledema and to perform Humphrey Visual Fields. I have patients see ophtho before doing spinal tap. I'm available for consults. ...Read more

20

20
Should a patient with intracranial hypertension be checked for stenosis before being shunted?

Should a patient with intracranial hypertension be checked for stenosis before being shunted?

ComplexHighRiskIssue: Seemingly simple questions often do not have simple & accurate answers. While i work to provide accurate & reasonably thorough answers (look for yourself), unfortunately, you have offered far too little information (no insult intended) about the individual & situation in question to even know where to begin without strong odds of offering irrelevant or even potentially harmful answers. ...Read more

Malignant (Definition)

The term malignant can be used in several medical contexts, but is primarily used to describe cancers. More dangerous and disorderly than the benign growth of cells, malignant cells have developed genetic changes that can allow it to invade other tissues in an unregulated way. These tumors can later spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body and ...Read more