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Doctor insights on: What Induces Apoptosis In Cancer Cells

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What induces apoptosis in cancer cells?

What induces apoptosis in cancer cells?

Many factors.: There are many factors/regulators that induce apoptosis in cancer and normal cells. These are defective or turned off in cancer cells. For example, the x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (xiap) is overexpressed in cancer cells. Xiaps bind to caspase-9, and suppress apoptotic activator cytochrom c, allowing the damaged cells to live. Deactivation of p53 apoptotic protein is another example. ...Read more

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Dr. Barry Rosen
4,364 doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


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What immune cells induce apoptosis in cancer?

What immune cells induce apoptosis in cancer?

Many: T cells, b cells and natural killer or nk cells. ...Read more

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How exactly does capsaicin cause apoptosis in cancer cells?

How exactly does capsaicin cause apoptosis in cancer cells?

Possibly many ways.: This is the active ingredient in chili peppers that causes a burning sensation. It binds to the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (vr1), which triggers a temperature oriented inflammatory reaction. Some of its effects on cancer are inconclusive, like stomach cancer. It appears to have proposed effects of other cancers, like breast cancer by causing apoptosis by affecting the egfr/her-2 pathway. ...Read more

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Would introducing mutated cells right next to cancer cells reverse the production of cancer cells?

Would introducing mutated cells right next to cancer cells reverse the production of cancer cells?

No: Cancer cells arise in a milieu of normal cells and have a growth advantage over them. I appreciate your idea, but it would be like putting a corrupted computer disk in with healthy ones in the hope of restoring its data. ...Read more

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In what ways can cancer cells escape programmed cell death?

In what ways can cancer cells escape programmed cell death?

Mutations: Several of the known mutations that contribute to the malignant phenotype work by opposing the normal mechanisms of apoptosis. The discovery of bcl2 mutations driving lymphoma was the first of many. Here's a now-classic paper http://carcin.Oxfordjournals.Org/content/21/3/485.Full. ...Read more

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How often do glial cells multiply and divide? Particularly glial cells in the brain stem? What causes cancer to form here? How many mutations?

How often do glial cells multiply and divide? Particularly glial cells in the brain stem? What causes cancer to form here? How many mutations?

I am sorry: because I know this is a serious question but unfortunately no one can answer any of these questions. Speed of mutation and number of mutations is entirely individual and we really don't know what causes brain stem glioma. Best of luck to you. ...Read more

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What distinguishes cancer cells from the cells of benign neoplasms?

What distinguishes cancer cells from the cells of benign neoplasms?

Disordered growth: Benign tumors grow locally and do not spread. Under the microscope, the cells look like the gland they are from and they are not invading. Cancer cells have disordered growth, frequently do not look like the originating gland and show invasion. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how cell division in normal cells compare to cell division in cancer cells?

Can you tell me how cell division in normal cells compare to cell division in cancer cells?

P53 mutation: In addition to the turning on of oncogenes producing proteins specific for cancer, there is a mutation in the p53 gene that controls cell cycle and prolongs interval to division when a mutation in DNA is recognized. This mutation rather than being repaired during the cell cycle is passed on to the next cell in the form of mutated DNA ...Read more

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In what way angiogenesis related to cancer & mitosis?

In what way angiogenesis related to cancer & mitosis?

Not really: When Folkman discovered angiostatin as a way of controlling animal tumors it was tried as a way of controlling cancer in patients. It failed. While blood vessels at the surface of the tumor are necessary for metastasis, most if not all tumors function by anaerobic metabolism and don't need blood. To help destroy tumor treat them in a hyperbaric chamber. ...Read more

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What immune cells induce apoptosis?

What immune cells induce apoptosis?

Many: T cells, b cells and natural killer or nk cells. ...Read more

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Cancer stem cells are the true cause of cancer, is that true?

Cancer stem cells are the true cause of cancer, is that true?

Cause?: Cancers arise from clones within clones within clones of genetically altered cells capable of giving rise to other cells -- the precursor cells are the tissue stem cells. Visible tumors are maintained largely by an inconspicuous subpopulation of cells within themselves, at least early. This is mostly a research focus and isn't any revolutionary new truth. ...Read more

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Can squamous cell cancer begin in the brain?

Can squamous cell cancer begin in the brain?

Yes: It is rare, and when it is truly primary rather than having spread from the ear or metastasized from the lung, it has begun in a dermoid cyst in a person with partial absence of the corpus callosum. ...Read more

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Which distinguishes cancer cells from the cells of benign neoplasms?

Which distinguishes cancer cells from the cells of benign neoplasms?

Genome destabilized: The key to cancer is that enough mutations have accumulated to render the genome itself unstable. Eventually a clone will acquire the ability to invade and spread. We can pick this up using molecular biology techniques. They also look different, but it takes a pathologist several years to learn to tell all the subtleties. ...Read more

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What is the mechanism by which mutations to the cell clock cause cancer?

What is the mechanism by which mutations to the cell clock cause cancer?

Unregulated growth: The "cell clock" is often referred to as the cell cycle. Think of this as a series of stop and go lights during the lifetime of a cell. Mutations can change a "stop light" to a "green light" resulting in unregulated growth of cells. That unregulated growth can result in the cancer. ...Read more

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What converts normal to cancer cells?

What converts normal to cancer cells?

Multiple steps: Changes in the dna of cells, some changes may be inherited, increase the growth rate of cells and additional changes to the 'dna develop and select for more growth. Many incipient cancers probably die out in the process. As more dna changes promoting growth accumulate the abnormal cells become autonomous, invade and metastasize. On average a cancer has 90 dna changes/mutations. ...Read more

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How is cancer related to cell division?

Mutation in p53: normal cells that divide have control over a mutation that arises. If so, the division is slowed by p53 so that mutations in DNA are repaired and not passed to next generation. In cancer the mutation in the p53 oncogene does not function to slow cell division for repair and the mutation is passed to next generation of cells. ...Read more

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How long is the process of mitosis in cancerous cells?

How long is the process of mitosis in cancerous cells?

Variable: There is not fixed frequency with which cancer cells divide. Rapidly growing tumors cells may undergo mitosis in a matter of days. In most tumors only a sub-population of the tumor replicates and the process usually takes months. ...Read more

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Do believe the research findings that garlic can cause tumor and cancer cells to undergo apoptosis?

Do believe the research findings that garlic can cause tumor and cancer cells to undergo apoptosis?

In vitro vs. In vivo: I am unclear about garlic in particular, but let's look at anti-cancer therapy more generally. Many, many (all?) things can kill cancer cells (=apoptosis; there are other modes of cell death, but apoptosis is the most common) in vitro (outside of the body). The predictive ability of in vitro killing to in vivo (in body) effectiveness is not great. ...Read more

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