Top
10
Doctor insights on: What Gas Is Typically Used In Anesthesia

Share
1

1
What gas is typically used in anesthesia?

What gas is typically used in anesthesia?

Multiple: The current gases we use are called sevoflurane, Desflurane and isoflurane. The anesthesiologist will choose which one based on many factors. Each one has its own special vaporizer, though old-timers will talk about copper kettles, drop ether, and older explosive gases. Other gases used are nitrous oxide, oxygen and air, with oxygen most flammable by far. We have safety features to protect you. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
Dr. Karen Sibert
2,177 doctors shared insights

Anesthesia (Definition)

Anesthesia is a field of study that involves methods of removing sensation, pain, and consciousness from a person in order to perform surgeries, do other uncomfortable procedures, or relieve his pain/suffering. A doctor specializing in ...Read more


2

2
Is general anesthesia caused by a gas or an injection?

Is general anesthesia caused by a gas or an injection?

Either or both: General anesthesia is a state of unconsciousness and lack of reaction to painful stimuli. It can be brought on by intravenous medications such as propofol, sodium pentothal, and ketamine. Anesthesia gases (desflurane, sevoflurane) will also produce general anesthesia. Often you will receive a combination of both during surgery. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
3

3
Is using laughing gas considered general anesthesia?

Is using laughing gas considered general anesthesia?

Usually, yes: "laughing gas" is the slang term used sometimes for a gas called nitrous oxide. It is a weak anesthetic gas that is not usually enough to produce general anesthesia by itself. For surgery, it is used in combination with other gases such as sevoflurane or desflurane. In the dentist's office, it is sometimes given to supplement the local anesthesia that the dentist will use to numb the tooth. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
6

6
I am interested in knowing whether I can have a tonsillectomy without general anesthesia. I am terrified of GA and wont have the surgery otherwise.

Depends...: ...on the doctor -- I think most prefer at least conscious sedation. I'm old enough to have had my tonsils out under local only, and neither the surgeon nor I have fond memories of the process. ...Read more

7

7
My 10 month old had tubes put in his ears on Monday. He was given gas. Could crankiness be linked to anesthesia since tubes shouldn't cause pain?

My 10 month old had tubes put in his ears on Monday. He was given gas. Could crankiness be linked to anesthesia since tubes shouldn't cause pain?

Yes: His crankiness could indeed be left over effects of his anesthetic causing him to feel "off". Be loving, cuddle a lot, play peek-a-boo with him a hundred times and wait a few days. If he's not back to himself by the end of the week, then it's time to investigate next week. If he starts running fever or other symptoms, have him peeked at sooner. ...Read more

See 2 more doctor answers
9

9
From what i know about gen. Anesthesia, you get a shot, they put a mask over you and you wake up. But is there any weird activity when you wake up like laughing gas?

From what i know about gen. Anesthesia, you get a shot, they put a mask over you and you wake up. But is there any weird activity when you wake up like laughing gas?

Generally not.: Most patients wake up uneventfully from a general anesthetic, assuming they have adequate pain control. There is something called emergence delirium, it is a phenomena which is fairly common in children and uncommon in adult patients. Patients with ptsd can wake up quite disoriented as well. If you have a history of ptsd, you should mention it to your anesthesiologist. ...Read more

See 1 more doctor answer

Gas (Definition)

In a medical context, "having gas" refers to having too much gas in the bowels. This causes burping, cramps in the belly, ...Read more