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Doctor insights on: What Does Glaucoma Look Like

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Can you please tell me why it'srecommended that people with glaucoma don't take midol and the like?

Can you please tell me why it'srecommended that people with glaucoma don't take midol and the like?

Open angles are okay: Midol contains an antihistamine called pyrilamine. All antihistamines have a potential effect on patients with narrow angle glaucoma. The effects of the antihistamine can dilate the pupil, which in turn can congest the angle. This effect can be too much in a narrow angle eye where the angle is already compromised. This can lead to increased pressures inside the eye and worsen glaucoma. Good luck! ...Read more

Dr. Robert Chang
1,034 Doctors shared insights

Glaucoma (Definition)

A condition that causes damage to your eye's optic nerve and gets worse over time. It's often linked to a buildup of pressure inside your eye. Without treatment, glaucoma can cause total permanent blindness ...Read more


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Selective laser trabeculoplasty for glaucoma == what is it like?

Selective laser trabeculoplasty for glaucoma == what is it like?

Light flashes: Your ophthalmologist or glaucoma specialist uses this device to administered an moderately intense laser beam to the drainage sites of the eye (meshwork) to cause them to transmit fluid better and lower the internal eye pressure. It is usually painless, rapid and the response follows quickly. ...Read more

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What is glaucoma?

Impaired eye fluid: Glaucoma is a condition in the inside of the eye, in which the fluid (aqueous humor) cannot get out at a low enough pressure to prevent the pressure from causing loss of the nerves and blood vessels at the back of the eye which causes vision to be lost. Measured will be eye pressure, corneal thickness, visual field, and disc structure. These are all part of the diagnosis. ...Read more

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What is glaucoma?

What is glaucoma?

Glaucoma: Glaucoma is a family of conditions that cause withering of the optic nerve and corresponding defects in the visual field.
It may or may not be associated with increased eye pressure. ...Read more

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What is glaucoma?

What is glaucoma?

Eye pressure problem: Glaucoma is an eye disorder that damages the eye’s optic nerve, which is the main nerve attached to the back of the eyeball. It usually happens when fluid builds up in the eyeball and increases the pressure inside the eye, thus damaging the optic nerve. Glaucoma is a cause of blindness for people over age 60. Blindness from glaucoma usually can be prevented with medical care. ...Read more

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Does glaucoma hurt?

Does glaucoma hurt?

It can: There are 2 main types of glaucoma, closed-angle (acute) and open-angle (chronic). Acute glaucoma is less common, but can present with sudden eye pain due to an increase in intraocular pressure. Chronic glaucoma commonly does not present with eye pain as the process of the disease is more gradual. Be sure to see your doctor if you are experiencing any eye symptoms or are concerned about glaucoma. ...Read more

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Is glaucoma painful?

Is glaucoma painful?

Not ordinarily: The two main types of glaucoma are open angle ; angle closure. The former is painless and progressive, if not stabilized. The latter also tends to be slow and progressive, but usually gradually closes the drainage angle of the eye. If acute angle closure of the angle occurs, considerable pain results and loss of vision ensues, if not urgently treated by medicine and laser or incisional surgery. ...Read more

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What causes glaucoma?

Mostly unknown: A few cases of glaucoma occur due to trauma, inherited problems and anatomical underpinnings. The majority - 'open angle glaucoma'- is largely age related with no known cause. ...Read more

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Is glaucoma inherited?

Is glaucoma inherited?

Some are: There are many different types of glaucoma, some caused secondarily through trauma or other diseases. But there are some type of glaucoma where genetics are involved but not 100%. In other words just because your parents have it doesn't mean you have to get it. However, risk is certainly higher.... ...Read more

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How is glaucoma defined?

3 factors: Glaucoma is an optic nerve problem, usually consisting of high pressure in the eye, evidence of damage to the nerve on exam and on testing (oct or HRT test) and evidence of damage to the peripheral or 'near central' vision on a visual field test. ...Read more

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How is glaucoma treated?

How is glaucoma treated?

Many ways: Treatment usually starts with eye drops. As the glaucoma progresses, laser then various incisional surgeries are used. ...Read more

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When does glaucoma start?

Ganglion cell death: And subsequent retinal nerve fiber layer loss--all basically starts when the mechanical pressure, vascular perfusion, inflammatory factors, and other neuromodulators lead to signal cell death. ...Read more

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How is glaucoma detected?

Eye exam and testing: Usually a glaucoma evaluation is triggered when the optic nerve appears large, the eye pressure is measured high, the peripheral vision is diminished, or the front part of the eye appears narrow. At that point a full glaucoma workup is performed including imaging of the optic nerves and visual fields to confirm progressive damage. ...Read more

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How is glaucoma diagnosed?

Eye exam: Through a combination of tests including structural (disc photo, optical coherence tomography) and visual function (visual field) that demonstrates progressive damage to the optic nerve over time. Typically, measuring intraocular pressure is involved since it is our main treatable risk factor for worsening disease. ...Read more

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What would cause glaucoma?

Many: Primary causes vs. Secondary causes. Genetic predisposition. Anything that damages the eye so that the level of eye pressure is harmful to the optic nerve and causes loss of retinal ganglion cells. The eye drain could be damaged, ocular perfusion could be affected, etc. ...Read more

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Who is at risk for glaucoma?

Everyone: Technically, glaucoma affects babies to adults. Typically older age is a higher risk. Certain ethnicities can be a higher risk for various types of glaucoma. Family history of glaucoma increases the risk. Glaucoma has many secondary causes as well. ...Read more

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What are symptoms of glaucoma?

Loss of side vision: Most glaucoma is asymptomatic. Acute angle closure glaucoma is associated with pain, blurred vision, nausea and a red eye. Open angle glaucoma is not symptomatic until late in the progression of the disease. This fact is why routine eye exams are recommended to detect the disease early in its course before irreversible damage to the optic nerve and the vision has occurred. ...Read more

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What are the types of glaucoma?

Many types: Typically the types are divided into "causes" or the "drain status"
thus primary glaucoma vs. Secondary glaucoma (caused by something that is affecting the drain of the eye)
or open angle vs. Closed angle glaucoma
basically glaucoma can happen at various pressures that is damaging to the individual patient, so there is no pressure cutoff. ...Read more

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What are the signs of glaucoma?

Signs & symptoms: There are 2 main types of glaucoma: acute closed-angle and chronic open-angle. Acute glaucoma usually affects one eye, presenting with sudden eye pain, blurred vision, halos seen around light, nausea and vomiting, and a non-reactive dilated pupil. Chronic glaucoma usually is asymptomatic, but can present with gradual loss of vision and headache. Both have increased intraocular pressures. ...Read more

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Hi, how will I treat glaucoma.?

Drops/Lasers/Surgery: Depending on the type and severity of glaucoma that you have, the options for treatment include different eye drops, laser treatments and surgical options. The goal of all treatment modalities is to lower the eye pressure. Speak with your eye doctor to determine which treatment option is best for you. ...Read more

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What exactly is acute glaucoma?

Fluid block in eye: The eye has an internal clear fluid circulation 24/7. This is called the aqueous humor. The iris in certain shaped eyes (usually farsighted) can obstruct the outflow and within 1/2 hour the pressure can skyrocket to dangerous levels. This is an emergency, can be stopped with certain drugs and prevented with laser. See your ophthalmologist immediately if you suspect this condition. ...Read more

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Can you tell me about glaucoma?

Yes: The eye maintains a 'normal' pressure to allow proper vision. Glaucoma has several forms but the hallmark is the internal eye pressure becomes higher than the nerves and blood vessels at the back of the eye can withstand and so vision diminishes. Treatment is to eliminate the cause if possible, or to lower the pressure with medication and/or surgery. ...Read more

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Glaucoma testing for juveniles?

Would be geat: There would be a low 'yield' unless you test only those with family history. ...Read more

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What are the stages of glaucoma?

Continuum: The glaucoma continuum has been proposed to describe the stages. Structure and function are mentioned. Early on, structural damage to the optic nerves occur without functional vision loss. As the disease progresses, visual deficits occur. ...Read more

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How do I know if I have glaucoma?

How do I know if I have glaucoma?

Eye exam plus: A comprehensive eye exam including a history of systemic & ocular problems, family history, & type of present medications. Intraocular pressure is measured. Dilation of the pupils is performed to evaluate the optic nerve, retina & blood vessels. Corneal pachymetry, optical coherence tomography, & visual field testing are performed as necessary. The data gathered is analyzed; diagnosis & treatment. ...Read more

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Who is most at risk for glaucoma?

Who is most at risk for glaucoma?

Anyone: Older age (over 60), african american or hispanic (asians narrow angle), positive family history, thin corneas, steroids, eye injuries. ...Read more

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How do you define early glaucoma?

How do you define early glaucoma?

Extent of damage: Glaucoma is a disease where the optic nerve is damaged. Early glaucoma would indicate that the optic nerve has sustained minimal damage. ...Read more

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What are the symptoms of glaucoma?

Depends: Most glaucoma is asymptomatic until end stage disease when the vision is decreased in both eyes. At that point, contrast, acuity, and peripheral vision are diminished. Thus, screening is key if at risk. A particular type called acute angle closure glaucoma with a sudden rise in eye pressure can have symptoms of red eye, severe eye pain, blurred vision, haloes, headache, nausea, vomiting... ...Read more