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Doctor insights on: What Does An Allergist Or An Immunologist Do To Diagnose Food Allergies

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What does an allergist or an immunologist do to diagnose food allergies?

What does an allergist or an immunologist do to diagnose food allergies?

A logical approach: The allergist takes a detailed history & then performs a physical examination. Rather than screening food allergy tests more likely to reveal false positives the allergist prefers, when possible, to perform tests relevant to your history. They may be skin or blood tests, sometimes both. If the diagnosis is uncertain oral challenges are performed in a safe setting with appropriate safeguards. ...Read more

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Dr. Thomas Namey
150 doctors shared insights

Immunology (Definition)

Immunology is a field of study in which a person studies the components of the immune system (such as lymph nodes, white blood cells, and antibodies), their functions, and their diseases. Because allergies are a reaction by a person's immune system, immunology usually includes the study of allergies. A doctor who specializes in problems of the immune system ...Read more


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Are there pediatric allergists who specialize in dealing with food allergies?

Are there pediatric allergists who specialize in dealing with food allergies?

Yes: All allergists are trained in both pediatric and adult allergy. Aaaai.Org is website that list board certified allergists in us. Be careful of some doctors who misrepresent themselves as allergists -- ask if they are fellowship trained in allergy, how long was the fellowship (2-3years) and are the board certfied by the american board of allergy and immunology. ...Read more

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Do you get shots when you see an allergist to test for food allergies?

Do you get shots when you see an allergist to test for food allergies?

Probably: You would usually get "shots" for interdermal testing, but most food allergys are not treated with "shots". They are treated with avoidance and oral drops. But the type of testing depends on the allergists. Some allergists use blood tests, others may use challange tests, which others may use interdermal testing. All are accepted methods of diagnosis. ...Read more

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How can I find a better trained/more up-to-date allergist? I have asthma. Should I look into a pulmonologist? Could a pulmo. manage food allergies?

How can I find a better trained/more up-to-date allergist? I have asthma. Should I look into a pulmonologist? Could a pulmo. manage food allergies?

Check aaaai.org: You need to find another allergist if you don't feel comfortable with your current one. I doubt that most pulmonologists have had any training or interest in food allergy. Look in the aaaai.org website to find another allergist and cross- reference your findings with those online rating sites. You are frustrated but need to keep trying since there are many well-trained allergists around. ...Read more

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Hello. My allergist told me that based on the symptoms I've experienced due to food allergies that it's not safe for me to do a food allergy test. I'm devastated because I was hoping for the test to provide some sort of confirmation because I'm at a place

Hello. My allergist told me that based on the symptoms I've experienced due to food allergies that it's not safe for me to do a food allergy test. I'm devastated because I was hoping for the test to provide some sort of confirmation because I'm at a place

Try blood test: Although blood test (ImmunoCap IgE) for food allergy may not be as sensitive to skin test, the results are more specific. In your case, I think blood tests should be obtained first and skin test to follow if blood test turns out to be negative. In double-blind food challenges, many presumed food allergies turned out to be false. Avoiding too many foods may lead to nutritional deficiency. ...Read more

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I have seasonal allergies similar to allergic tension fatigue syndrome. However I have no food allergies. And the neurologist and allergist is stumped?

I have seasonal allergies similar to allergic tension fatigue syndrome. However I have no food allergies. And the neurologist and allergist is stumped?

Allergies: Seasonal allergies usually consist of trees and grasses in the spring and ragweed in the summer. Food allergies Don't necessarily coexist with the seasonal allergies. Has the allergist tested you and tried treating your seasonal allergies with specific shots as well as medications? ...Read more

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3yr old h/O failure to thrive/poor growth. Ped GI found IgA 183, ESR 26, calprotectin 165, burr cells 1+. Plan is to repeat labs & if unchanged colonoscopy. food allergy??? Maybe see allergist too????

3yr old h/O failure to thrive/poor growth. Ped GI found IgA 183, ESR 26, calprotectin 165, burr cells 1+. Plan is to repeat labs & if unchanged colonoscopy. food allergy??? Maybe see allergist too????

Failure to thrive : I think your GI doctor suggested an upper endoscopy with possible sigmoidoscopy. Eosinophilic gastroenteropathy Is a possible reason which is evaluated by biopsies. If the biopsies are consistent with above then next step is an allergist but make sure you see a pediatric allergist who is familiar with this condition. There are other reasons for failure to thrive as well so follow your GI rec's ...Read more

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Can there be any test to diagnose a suspected food allergy or intolerance?

Can there be any test to diagnose a suspected food allergy or intolerance?

Yes and not really: Food allergy is diagnosed by assessing the history (in the context of symptoms), and either allergy skin test or specific ige blood test. These are especially helpful in confirming a patient does not have food allergy if test is negative. Sometimes a food challenge is performed to really assess if the food allergy is present. Lactose intolerance can be diagnosed with a breath hydrogen test. ...Read more

Dr. Michael Zacharisen
569 doctors shared insights

Food Allergy (Definition)

Allergies usually mean there is a response like diarrhea, vomiting, hives, or anaphylaxis when that food is eaten. Other allergies can be more subtle and lead to chronic congestion, headaches, eczema, rashes, constipation, etc. Best answer- if concerned about a particular food eliminate it from your diet and see how you respond. You can ...Read more


Dr. John Chiu
2,491 doctors shared insights

Allergies (Definition)

Allergies occur when your immune system is triggered by envirionmental factors it should ignore--for example, pollen in the air, or dander on a cat or dog--and creates cells to fight against them. An allergic reaction typically causes itching, congestion, or drainage, and ...Read more