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Doctor insights on: What Cause Cancer Cells To Develop

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Having thoughts that food I eat causes cancer cells. I'm scared of getting cancer thoughts are taking over?

Having thoughts that food I eat causes cancer cells. I'm scared of getting cancer thoughts are taking over?

Cancer obsession: Do you usually obsessive over health? It sounds like this is is significantly impacting your life. If there is no medical basis, or these concerns are not reasonable/ not rationale - would encourage you to seek help from a psychologist who is familiar with cognitive behavioral therapy. This can be be treated. Take care. ...Read more

Dr. Barry Rosen
4,351 Doctors shared insights

Cancer (Definition)

Cancer is a group of diseases that is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth leading to invasion of surrounding tissues that spread to other parts of the body. Cancer can begin anywhere in the body and is usually related to one or more genetic mutations that allow normal cells to become malignant by interfering with internal cellular control mechanisms, such as programmed cell death or by preventing ...Read more


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What causes cancer cells to break away and spread? Could trauma be one of the causes?

What causes cancer cells to break away and spread? Could trauma be one of the causes?

Probably not a facto: Tumor cells, by nature are not adhesive like normal cells are. So it is their basic nature to invade and spread. Trauma is not likely to make any difference, as far as we know. ...Read more

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What causes skin cancer cells to go from normal to a cancer?

What causes skin cancer cells to go from normal to a cancer?

Ultraviolet light: While there is a new study implicating cigarette smoking as a contributing factor, most research points to ultraviolet light (sunshine, tanning bed, welding torch rays) as the most common trigger. More rarely, long term exposure to certain chemicals can also cause this in factory or farm workers whose skin is constantly exposed. A weakened immune system can aid the transformation. ...Read more

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Do believe the research findings that garlic can cause tumor and cancer cells to undergo apoptosis?

Do believe the research findings that garlic can cause tumor and cancer cells to undergo apoptosis?

In vitro vs. In vivo: I am unclear about garlic in particular, but let's look at anti-cancer therapy more generally. Many, many (all?) things can kill cancer cells (=apoptosis; there are other modes of cell death, but apoptosis is the most common) in vitro (outside of the body). The predictive ability of in vitro killing to in vivo (in body) effectiveness is not great. ...Read more

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What helps cancer cells to grow? I read that cancer constantly occurs, and the immune system keeps them under control. So what causes multiplication?

What helps cancer cells to grow? I read that cancer constantly occurs, and the immune system keeps them under control. So what causes multiplication?

Cancer cells: Cancer cells grow and proilferate after there is a dna damage leading to uncontrolled cell growth. Several molecular pathyways are involved in cancer cell proliferation and growth. They also need angiogenesis and help from surrounding epithelial and mesenchymal cells to grow (microenvironment). The immune system can control micrometastasis but sometimes these cells escape immunosurveillance. ...Read more

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Since we all have cancer cells in our body but our body fights them, but what causes those cells to eventually no longer be defeated by our immune system?

Since we all have cancer cells in our body but our body fights them, but what causes those cells to eventually no longer be defeated by our immune system?

Too many mutations: Cells do change and are recognized and disposed. Eventually a series of several changes do occur in the cell and once all of these have happened does the cell proliferates in the manner we associated with cancer. ...Read more

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How exactly does capsaicin cause apoptosis in cancer cells?

How exactly does capsaicin cause apoptosis in cancer cells?

Possibly many ways.: This is the active ingredient in chili peppers that causes a burning sensation. It binds to the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (vr1), which triggers a temperature oriented inflammatory reaction. Some of its effects on cancer are inconclusive, like stomach cancer. It appears to have proposed effects of other cancers, like breast cancer by causing apoptosis by affecting the egfr/her-2 pathway. ...Read more

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If my bloody urine is caused by cancer, would there be cancer cells in the urine too?

If my bloody urine is caused by cancer, would there be cancer cells in the urine too?

Maybe: Transitional cell carcinoma can be detected by urine cytology but it's not 100% sensitive. Other cancers such as breast or lung cancer will most likely not show up in the urine. Blood in the urine can be caused by many other things including chemotherapy for other cancers. Let your doctor know you have blood in the urine. ...Read more

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I had an Endoscopy on Friday, and was diagnosed with Gastritis with bleeding. My Dr took a biopsy to find the cause. Can Cancer cells cause this?

I had an Endoscopy on Friday, and was diagnosed with Gastritis with bleeding. My Dr took a biopsy to find the cause. Can Cancer cells cause this?

Yes: Bleeding per se in stomach not result of superficial gastritis unless superficial ulceration noted or a distinct ulcerating lesion which may have resulted from h.pylori. If such a lesion hasn't resolved on blockers to minimize acid production, then bx indicated because many such lesions do convert to malignancy. ...Read more

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Do Cherry angiomas cause cancer cells to form through angiogensis. I read angiogensis causes them and cancer feeds off of angiogensis. Scared of cance?

Do Cherry angiomas cause cancer cells to form through angiogensis. I read angiogensis causes them and cancer feeds off of angiogensis. Scared of cance?

Unlikely: Hello and thank you for your excellent question. A cherry angioma is, by definition, a benign lesion. The chances of it contributing to cancer are essentially zero. However, if you are concerned, seek medical attention. I suggest consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon. Good luck! ...Read more

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There is cancer cells in his left lung but pathology can't pen down the cause or where the cancer is?

There is cancer cells in his left lung but pathology can't pen down the cause or where the cancer is?

We can't help: Pathology is usually helpful in identifying a potential source for metastatic disease, but as you are finding out, sometimes not conclusive. Further testing including imaging may be done. Ultimately, the physicians on the case know much much more than we do and it is hard to offer any additional insight. Be persistent in opening lines of communication with the treatment team. ...Read more

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How often should I receive a mammogram I am 29 years old. I have had a knot in my right breast since 2007, my dr says it is caused of caffine but it gets sore sometimes the first knot I had I had it removed it came back non cancer and no cancer cells wher

How often should I receive a mammogram I am 29 years old. I have had a knot in my right breast since 2007, my dr says it is caused of caffine but it gets sore sometimes the first knot I had I had it removed it came back non cancer and no cancer cells wher

Yearly (begin @ 40): Mammograms remain our best test to screen for breast cancer. Most us experts advise starting at 40 (or 10 yrs younger than a close family member who had breast ca). The lump you describe sounds classic for fibrocystic changes: "lumpy-bumpy" breast tissue that is sensitive to hormonal changes. If you find a new lump, it is always best to see your gyne or primary care dr. To be extra-cautious. ...Read more

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Why do I have small cherry angiomas on breasts. I'm 29 never been pregnant or on the pill. Do I have high estrogen? Cherry angiomas cause cancer cells

These are entirely b: Cherry Angiomas are benign and do not pose any health risks. You can safely ignore them as they have nothing to do with hormones or in causing Cancer. ...Read more

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Can cancer cells travel from the urethra, through the vas deferens, to the testicles, and cause testicular cancer? Can this be a path of metastasis?

Can cancer cells travel from the urethra, through the vas deferens, to the testicles, and cause testicular cancer? Can this be a path of metastasis?

No: What you described a path of tumor cells to spread is not feasible. Tumor cells may reach testes via blood but via the route you described.
For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form.
Practice safe sex. ...Read more

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How can cancer cells take over?

Cancer cells: Have lost most if not all of the control mechanisms normal cells have, so they grow uncontrollably and spread to other organs, ultimately causing irreversible damage to vital systems and death. It is more complex than that, of course, but we have a limited space to answer. ...Read more

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What are the danger of cancer cells?

What are the danger of cancer cells?

"Spread": What makes a cancer "evil" is the potential to break away from its organ of origin and take up residence in another one;when evident, we call this metastases. We can correlate the probability of cancer cells being "elsewhere" with its stage. Based on the stage & the unique molecular features of the tumor, we may recommend chemotherapy to kill cells that may have gone to other organs. ...Read more

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What occurs if you ate cancer cells?

What occurs if you ate cancer cells?

Ugh....: Hannibal lecter may have eaten some and he is cancer free. Seriously, gastric acid should dissolve any cell not killed by cooking (please tell me it was not raw!). No chance of getting cancer that way. Weirdly interesting question. ...Read more

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What converts normal to cancer cells?

What converts normal to cancer cells?

Multiple steps: Changes in the dna of cells, some changes may be inherited, increase the growth rate of cells and additional changes to the 'dna develop and select for more growth. Many incipient cancers probably die out in the process. As more dna changes promoting growth accumulate the abnormal cells become autonomous, invade and metastasize. On average a cancer has 90 dna changes/mutations. ...Read more

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What can you tell me about cancer cells?

What can you tell me about cancer cells?

One mutant cell: One normal cell inside your body mutates (becomes abnormal), and begins to divide. The normal "stop" signal that tell a cell to stop dividing doesn't work, so the cells keep dividing. One cell becomes two, two become four, four become eight, etc. It takes millions of cancer cells to form a tumor that can be seen on an X-ray or felt on exam. ...Read more

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How do you find the different cancer cells?

How do you find the different cancer cells?

Under the Microscope: Cancer is usually diagnosed by performing a biopsy of the area of suspicion. The tissue is examined by a pathologist for microscopic evaluation, supplemented by special tests to look for proteins associated with certain cancers. ...Read more

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Can cancer cells continue living after you die?

No: They die with the person -- perhaps even a bit faster as they're generally less adaptable. ...Read more

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How to know when do cancer cells begin growing?

How to know when do cancer cells begin growing?

That is a vague ques: Cancer cells are rarely quiet...They are nearly always growing although there is a theory of dormancy which is talked about but it is hard to prove it! ...Read more

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Please help! What happens in cancer cell biology?

Please help! What happens in cancer cell biology?

Man, there are: ..Entire books meant to answer that. Cells have instructions in their dna that establish their behavior. Sometimes those instructions are changed (mutations) and the cells start dividing too much, "learn" how to spread, and bypass their "self destruct" mechanisms. That ultimately leads to a malignancy. It is way more complicated that that but I ain't got space. Try the acs or the nci websites. ...Read more

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Are all cancer cells the same regardless of organ?

No: Cancer is basically the body's cells that mutate and grow out of control at the expense of healthy cells. Because the body has many types of cells, there are many types of cancer cells. Even cells of the same type can have different mutations. This is why cancer is hard to cure. Pathologists and oncologists study these differences to create treatment plans for each patient's unique case. ...Read more

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What are the ways that cancer cells begin to grow?

What are the ways that cancer cells begin to grow?

Sequential mutations: Series of gene changes usually beginning with p53 giving immortality to the cell. Then genes induce oncofetal proteins which function to allow fetus to mature and then turn off. Post translational modifications in the proteins of these genes which have been demethylated by virus or carcinogen lead to cells producing the cancer protein and then phenotypically change to the malignancy. ...Read more

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How do cancer cells spread from their original site?

Multi-step process: Cancer develops due to progressive damage to the genome of the cells exposed to various insults. The initial change facilitates cell growth and additional damage changes the dna of the cells that enables them to grow unchecked, invade local tissues, including lymphatics and blood vessels. The malignant cells are then carried through the lymph and/or blood to other organs. ...Read more

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In what ways are cancer cells different from other cells?

Destabilized: By the time it's part of an invasive cancer, the genome of a clone of cancer cell has taken enough mutations that it's remembered how to do things that adult cells shouldn't do (invade, spread, recruit other cells to help with the mischief.) eventually, the genome loses the ability to prevent more mutations from accumulating rapidly. Natural selection as in nature, but in the body. ...Read more

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Can you tell me, how are drugs used to treat cancer cells?

Can you tell me, how are drugs used to treat cancer cells?

Chemotherapy: Drugs that are used to treat cancer come in different types, but most fall under the category of chemotherapy. These drugs interfere with the cancer cells' ability to reproduce. There are other drugs called targeted therapies or immunotherapies. The treatment type is different for each cancer. ...Read more

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Can you tell me how cancer cells differ from regular cells?

They invade: Cancer cells have mutations in what are called proto oncogenes that allow the cell to divide when there are abnormalities in their DNA that would normally be repaired. These mutations allow the metabolic pathway to be altered to use anaerobic glycolysis, produce invasive enzymes known as metalloproteinases and reach immortality by having the telomerase enzyme activated for immortality ...Read more