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Doctor insights on: What Are The Side Effects For Kidney Transplant Donors

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Dr. Ravi Chand
3 doctors shared insights

Transplant (Definition)

In medicine: a transfer from one body or body part to another of an organ (liver, heart, lung, kidney, pancreas bowel) or tissue (hand, face, hair). The immune system fights foreign invaders (like infections) so it will reject transplants from other people (allotransplants) because they look like infections. So transplants usually require drugs to ...Read more


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Can a live kidney donor who has mersa still be a donor for a kidney transplant?

Can a live kidney donor who has mersa still be a donor for a kidney transplant?

Sure, once treated: Some people carry the MRSA bugs on their skin/nasal cavities w/o causing problem, so it is not necessarily a problem for donating a kidney if ithe person does not have a problem with active infection. The surgical process is sterile and so it should not be an issue. If the donor is having active infection, it should be treated. Consult doc. Good luck. ...Read more

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Will a kidney transplant recipient be receiving one or two kidneys from a cadaver donor?

Will a kidney transplant recipient be receiving one or two kidneys from a cadaver donor?

Usually 1: Most if the time 1 kidney is transplanted. Occasionally 2 very small (pediatric) kidneys are kept connected to each other and transplanted "e bloc" - they grow quickly. Some older kidneys with low function are transplanted together (but separated) to try to provide enough function in combination. The recipient should understand and give consent (or not) in advance. ...Read more

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How can a kidney transplant effect the donor?

How can  a kidney transplant effect the donor?

Unos.org: Please see this link for more detailed information. http://www.unos.org/docs/living_donation.pdf. ...Read more

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Kidney transplant recepient can receive other blood group kidney from donor whose blood group is differ from from receiver?

Kidney transplant recepient can receive other blood group kidney from donor whose blood group is differ from from receiver?

Theoretically: Yes... But it's not recommended. It would require desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis, metc, if incompatible. Compatible donor to recipient pairs don't require these protocols. ...Read more

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Can patient with fsgs and aiha undergo kidney transplant ? Whether the patient should go for live donor or cadaver transplant ? What r success rate?

Fsgs recurs but,: Fsgs is okay to transplant whether live donor or not! however, recurrence, is possible. Fsgs returns in about one third of the transplanted kidneys i.e. Every 3 persons with kidney failure due to fsgs who get transplant, one of them will see fsgs affecting his transplant. The disease may take years to appear however. So, possible recurrence is not a reason to not transplant persons with fsgs. ...Read more

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Post donor kidney transplant, how many days do I have to wait to have sex?

Post donor kidney transplant, how many days do I have to wait to have sex?

Donor or recipient?: Donor will be sore but should be able to have sexual contact after they are released from the hospital (2-5) days for laparoscopic longer for open surgery. Recipient will also be sore and i recommend at least 2 weeks after discharge before having intercourse. Oral and manual stimulation could be performed sooner. ...Read more

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How successful is the kidney transplant if the donor has a different blood group? Does the graft have chancesof failing early?

Great if compatible: Excellent outcomes occur for kidney donors with different blood groups than their recipients if the pair is compatible (don a-recip ab; don b - recip ab; don o-recip a, b orab). Incompatible paired kidney transplants are subject to antibody based rejection due to the difference in blood types. Prevention with plasmapheresis, use of Rituxan (rituximab) is good not perfect. Yes, early failure can still happen. ...Read more

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My sister is in the hospital with kidney failure. Does she need an organ transplant right away? If she can't get a kidney transplant, will she be able to survive with just dialysis until she can get a donor?

The : The short answer is almost certainly "no", although every patient is different, and critical care patients by definition have complex medical stories. Acute kidney injury (or aki, also known as "acute renal failure") is very common in hospitalized patients, and particularly patients in intensive care (although you do not say your sister is actually in intensive care) there are degrees of kidney failure ranging from mild and quickly reversible, to permanent and complete. The kidneys are very sensitive to what is going on around them -- they're sort of the "canary in a coal mine" of our organ systems. So they tend to protest severe illness early by not making enough urine and allowing toxic byproducts to build up in the bloodstream. Fortunately, usually hospital acquired acute kidney failure goes away with minimal intervention. When it doesn't, the function of the kidneys can often (depending on the other medical circumstances) be replaced with a machine which removes the things the kidneys usually remove from the blood(dialysis). Dialysis isn't a perfect replacement for functioning kidneys by any means, but it's good enough for the short term, and many people live for decades on dialysis. Not every patient can benefit from dialysis -- the choice of whether to initiate dialysis is made on an individual basis. Kidney transplant is usually only made available to patients who have complete and permanent kidney failure, are dialysis dependent, and are doing very well otherwise. I hope you have found this helpful, and that your sister feels better soon. ...Read more

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Dr. Ravi Chand
13 doctors shared insights

Kidney Transplant (Definition)

Kidneys anatomically require connection to an artery for blood supply, a vein for blood drainage and the bladder for urine outflow. In a transplant a healthy kidney is disconnected from its usual attachments and moved to a new location with those 3 requirements (artery, vein, bladder). This may be an auto-txp - somewhere else in your own body; or an allo-txp -from ...Read more


Kidney (Definition)

The kidneys are paired organs that lie on either side of the vertebral column. Part of their critical functions include the excretion of urine and removal of nitrogenous wastes products from the blood. They regulate acid-base, electrolyte, fluid balance and blood pressure. Through hormonal signals, the kidneys control the ...Read more